How (and Why) to Tap Into the Career Potential of Your Young Workers

Amongst the turmoil of recent months, young people have been one of the major losers on the workforce front. Under 25s, in particular, have felt the brunt of furloughs and lay-offs. In Europe during May 2020, unemployment among the under 25s rose three times as fast as the overall average. The consequences of this will be felt long after the immediate crisis passes. Not just by the individuals themselves, but by their former, current and future employers. 



a man and a woman sitting at a desk


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Hindering growth

Even short periods of unemployment at the start of a career can affect a young person’s long-term career prospects. One month of unemployment when you are 18 to 20 causes a lifetime income loss of 2%. Any time taken off work will impact the skills and experience that a young person can develop — skills that are crucial to keeping up in the job market. This translates to more limited job prospects, a higher likelihood of future unemployment and reduced pay. 

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For employers, this could increase the already widening skills gap. Losing young people early in their careers also stops an employer from benefiting from that individual’s career potential and their ability to build and use new skills to meet the business’ changing needs. 

Related: 5 Things Leaders Can Do for Graduates in the Covid Economy

Everyone must be involved

It’s in everyone’s interest to boost a young person’s employment and potential to develop new skills. Governments are recognizing this and placing significant emphasis on supporting young people through the many challenges of 2020. The EU, for example, is urging governments to use EU funds to create more youth jobs and training. The UK Government has announced a £2 billion scheme to kickstart young people’s careers. According to their research, young workers make up almost a quarter (24%) of the UK’s workforce.

However, it’s up to businesses to continue carrying out these efforts once the immediate urgency and investment stop. The UK’s kickstart scheme is a 6-month program, and it will fall short of what businesses and young workers really need. What’s required is a long-term, continuous commitment to growing youth careers — and this begins with consistent upskilling. 

Widening skills needs

The half-life of skills is decreasing, currently hovering around five years. One billion jobs will need to be reconfigured over the next decade, and young workers will be at the forefront of this change.

One key skill that business leaders would do well to cultivate in their workforce is adaptability. As jobs shift, the skill requirements of each role will also evolve. For individuals to continue to have relevant skills, and for businesses to remain competitive, upskilling is needed. 

How to upskill young talent

With this in mind, how can business leaders upskill their young workers over the long-term?

Identify your workforce’s skills: Start by identifying your workers’ current and future skills. Assessing their current skills will give an accurate starting point that progress can be measured against. It’s also worth

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The Latest: Young S. Koreans taking crucial university exam

A student checks the time as others wait for the start of the annual college entrance examination amid the coronavirus pandemic at an exam hall in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. South Korean officials are urging people to remain at home if possible and cancel gatherings as about half a million students prepare for a crucial national college exam.

A student checks the time as others wait for the start of the annual college entrance examination amid the coronavirus pandemic at an exam hall in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. South Korean officials are urging people to remain at home if possible and cancel gatherings as about half a million students prepare for a crucial national college exam.

AP

SEOUL, South Korea — Hundreds of thousands of masked students in South Korea, including 35 COVID-19 patients, are taking the country’s highly competitive university entrance exam despite a viral resurgence that has forced authorities to toughen social distancing rules.

The Education Ministry says about 493,430 students began taking the one-day test at about 1,380 test sites across South Korea on Thursday. It says the test sites include hospitals and other medical facilities where the 35 virus patients and hundreds of others placed under self-quarantine will take the exam.

The annual test is a crucial step for many students’ lives in the education-obsessed country. The university from which a South Korean graduates significantly affects job prospects, social standings and even marriage partners.

This year’s test was originally scheduled for November but was delayed due to the virus outbreak.

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THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— U.K. approves Pfizer coronavirus vaccine for emergency use, puts Britain on track to start vaccinations soon

— International Red Cross seeks equitable access to vaccines

— Russia and Germany hit record numbers of daily coronavirus deaths

— Tokyo Olympic fans from abroad may have health tracked by app

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Follow AP’s coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

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ISTANBUL — Turkey’s health minister has announced a plan for vaccinations starting with an experimental inactivated vaccine later in December to combat the COVID-19 pandemic amid a surge in infections and deaths.

Minister Fahrettin Koca had previously announced an agreement with Chinese biopharmaceutical company Sinovac for 50 million doses of CoronaVac, with the first shipment to arrive after Dec. 11. The minister said early-use authorization would be granted after Turkish labs confirm the vaccine’s safety.

“If developments continue positively as we expect, Turkey would be among the first countries in the world to begin vaccinations in the early phase,” Koca said Thursday.

Health care workers, citizens above 65 and people living in care homes will be the first groups to be vaccinated. Next will be essential workers and people above 50 with at least one chronic disease. Third will be people younger than 50 with at least one chronic illness, young adults and other workers would be vaccinated. The fourth and final phase will be for the rest of the population. Turkey’s president has said the vaccine will be administered free of charge.

In November, The Lancet published a study about the efficacy of Sinovac’s vaccine, saying efficacy was determined to be moderate.

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NEW DELHI — India is reporting less than 40,000 new daily coronavirus cases for a fourth straight day as it awaits a vaccine rollout for its vast

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Young S. Koreans taking crucial university exam

SEOUL, South Korea — Hundreds of thousands of masked students in South Korea, including 35 COVID-19 patients, are taking the country’s highly competitive university entrance exam despite a viral resurgence that has forced authorities to toughen social distancing rules.



A student checks the time as others wait for the start of the annual college entrance examination amid the coronavirus pandemic at an exam hall in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. South Korean officials are urging people to remain at home if possible and cancel gatherings as about half a million students prepare for a crucial national college exam. (Kim Hong-Ji/Pool Photo via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
A student checks the time as others wait for the start of the annual college entrance examination amid the coronavirus pandemic at an exam hall in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. South Korean officials are urging people to remain at home if possible and cancel gatherings as about half a million students prepare for a crucial national college exam. (Kim Hong-Ji/Pool Photo via AP)

The Education Ministry says about 493,430 students began taking the one-day test at about 1,380 test sites across South Korea on Thursday. It says the test sites include hospitals and other medical facilities where the 35 virus patients and hundreds of others placed under self-quarantine will take the exam.



Parents pray during a special service to wish for their children's success in the college entrance exams at the Jogyesa Buddhist temple in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. Hundreds of thousands of masked students in South Korea, including dozens of confirmed COVID-19 patients, took the highly competitive university entrance exam Thursday despite a viral resurgence that forced authorities to toughen social distancing rules. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)


© Provided by Associated Press
Parents pray during a special service to wish for their children’s success in the college entrance exams at the Jogyesa Buddhist temple in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. Hundreds of thousands of masked students in South Korea, including dozens of confirmed COVID-19 patients, took the highly competitive university entrance exam Thursday despite a viral resurgence that forced authorities to toughen social distancing rules. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

The annual test is a crucial step for many students’ lives in the education-obsessed country. The university from which a South Korean graduates significantly affects job prospects, social standings and even marriage partners.



People wear face masks but stand close together as they wait for a subway train in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)


© Provided by Associated Press
People wear face masks but stand close together as they wait for a subway train in Frankfurt, Germany, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

This year’s test was originally scheduled for November but was delayed due to the virus outbreak.

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THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— U.K. approves Pfizer coronavirus vaccine for emergency use, puts Britain on track to start vaccinations soon

— International Red Cross seeks equitable access to vaccines

— Russia and Germany hit record numbers of daily coronavirus deaths

— Tokyo Olympic fans from abroad may have health tracked by app

___

Follow AP’s coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak



Healthcare workers protest coronavirus pandemic working conditions at Sunrise hospital Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)


© Provided by Associated Press
Healthcare workers protest coronavirus pandemic working conditions at Sunrise hospital Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:



FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2020, file photo, student nurse Ryan Eachus collects forms as cars line up for COVID-19 testing at a testing site set at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa, Calif. California reported more than 20,000 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020, shattering the previous record of 18,350 cases just a week ago. Overall, California has reported more than 1.2 million COVID-19 cases and more than 19,300 deaths. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Nov. 16, 2020, file photo, student nurse Ryan Eachus collects forms as cars line up for COVID-19 testing at a testing site set at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa, Calif. California reported more than 20,000 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020, shattering the previous record of 18,350 cases just a week ago. Overall, California has reported more than 1.2 million COVID-19 cases and more than 19,300 deaths. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

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ISTANBUL — Turkey’s health minister has announced a plan for vaccinations

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Young continents were fragile and prone to destruction

Dec. 2 (UPI) — Earth’s earliest continents were fragile and destruction-prone, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Earth formed roughly 4.5 billion years ago, but the planet’s infancy — its first 1.5 billion years — and the processes that shaped its continental features are poorly understood.

“This was the time of formation of the first continents, the emergence of land, the development of the early atmosphere and the appearance of primordial life — all of which are the result of the dynamics of our planet’s interiors,” lead study author Fabio Capitanio said in a news release.

For the new study, Capitanio and his colleagues created computer models simulate the conditions of early Earth.

“We show that the release of internal primordial heat, three to four times that of the present-day, caused large melting in the shallow mantle, which was then extruded as magma … onto the Earth’s surface,” said Capitanio, a researcher at Monash in Australia.

According to the models, the pieces of mantle left behind by this process formed the keels of the planet’s first continents. The landforms, however, were dehydrated and rigid.

Simulations suggest the first continents remained weak for billions of years, and were prone to destruction. Early on, Earth’s landforms were easy to melt, making them more malleable, allowing them to became increasingly differentiated.

Over time, this process produced larger and more rigid pieces of mantle, forming what would become the cores of modern continents.

Today, these cores take the form of cratons, the large, stable chunks of mantle and crust found in the interior of Earth’s continents.

The process of early continent formation was essential to the evolution of Earth’s geochemistry and, ultimately, the planet’s biochemistry.

“The emergence of these rigid early continents resulted in their weathering and erosion, changing the composition of the atmosphere and providing nutrients to the ocean seeding the development of life,” Capitanio said.

The new research also explains why so little of Earth’s primordial crust remains. The destruction and incorporation of Earth’s earliest continental crust into the mantle helped reinforce the keel-like chunks of mantle that came to form cratons.

According to Capitanio and his colleagues, these cratons house the earliest evidence of life on Earth, but they make up only a tiny fraction of Earth’s surface.

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Houston Rodeo dedicates $21 million to young participants and youth education

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo officials approved an educational commitment of $21,691,500 to support Texas youth for next year. These funds will be distributed to over 800 scholarships.

The news comes after the rodeo announced its plans for next year. The event will refrain from having their adult oriented open show, and shift focus to the junior-level programming.

NEXT YEAR’S PLANS: Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo announces plans for 2021 Livestock Show

The rodeo is keeping its promise, as the educational commitment will distribute some of those dollars to scholarships, junior show exhibitors, educational program grants and graduate assistantships.


“Despite a heartbreaking early closure in 2020 and the difficult months that followed, the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo remained committed to its mission of promoting agriculture and supporting Texas youth and education, and we hope today’s announcement is a bright spot in a challenging year,” said Chris Boleman, Rodeo president and CEO.

While funds for scholarships and junior show exhibitors will be gifted directly to participants, the educational program grants and graduate assistantships will be awarded differently.

The educational program grants will be awarded to 501(c)(3) charities and accredited institutions of higher education that are in direct alignment with the Rodeo’s mission. As for the graduate assistantships, they will be awarded to 11 Texas Universities, and each school will be able to have their own application and selection process, according to the release.

“Thanks to the unwavering support from our community, and the resiliency of our dedicated 35,000 volunteers who share a passion for our charitable mission, we are able to reaffirm our promise to the youth of Texas and also lend support to charitable organizations that serve our great community and state.”

The 2021 rodeo will be held March 2 to 21. You can find more information on its website.

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Megalodons, the Ocean’s Most Ferocious Prehistoric Predators, Raised Their Young in Nurseries | Smart News

Millions of years ago, monstrously sized sharks named megalodons dominated the ocean. These giants grew larger than modern day humpback whales, casually snacked on animals like dolphins and seals, had the strongest bite force of any creature to ever exist—yes, including T. rex. But despite being fierce predators, a new study published last week in the journal Biology Letters suggests that megalodons were pretty good parents and raised their young in nurseries, reports Mindy Weisberger for Live Science.

Nurseries provide a safe haven for baby sharks to grow before they depart to take on the great blue sea. They are typically found in warm, shallow waters, such as coral reefs and mangroves, that offer an abundance of food. Nurseries also shield baby sharks from predators and protect them as they learn to hunt, reports Melissa Cristina Márquez for Forbes. And this behavior didn’t die out with the megalodons—some modern-day shark species, like great whites and catsharks, also raise their young in nurseries.

“I just find it fascinating that even what many call the ‘biggest and baddest shark of all time’ had to spend the first few years of its life growing up in a special location before it could dominate the oceans itself,” Phillip Sternes, a shark researcher at University of California, Riverside, who was not involved in the study, tells Forbes.

In this new study, a team of scientists analyzed a set of 25 megalodon teeth collected around northeastern Spain. The teeth were much too small to belong to the fully grown giants, so the scientists figured that the teeth must have belonged to juveniles, reports Lucy Hicks for Science. Fossil evidence also suggests that millions of years ago, the same region had shallow shorelines, warm water and flourishing marine life, which would have made it a perfect place for baby sharks to thrive. Given the collection of baby teeth and the geography of the area, the scientists determined that a megalodon nursery must have existed there, reports Eleonore Hughes for Agence France-Presse (AFP).

Armed with new information about megalodon shark nurseries, the scientists analyzed nearly 500 more megalodon teeth collected from eight different spots around the world to figure out where other nurseries could have existed. They identified four more potential nursery sites—two in the United States and two in Panama—ranging in age from 3.6 million years old to 16 million years old.

In 2010, a different team, including Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute scientists, discovered a megalodon nursery in Panama from 10 million years ago. At the time, the team wasn’t sure if megalodon nurseries were widespread or a random occurrence. This new study adds substantial evidence that baby megalodons were raised in nurseries, Science reports.

This discovery also offers a new theory to how the world’s most ferocious predator went extinct more than 3 million years ago, which remains a pervasive mystery. They know that megalodons thrived during a period of warm temperatures that lasted for millions of years. But as

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Fast-moving gas flowing away from young star caused by icy comet vaporisation

Fast-moving gas flowing away from young star caused by icy comet vaporisation
Artist’s impression of the system, with the star at the center, and the inner dust belt from which gas is produced and dispersed outwards to the far reaches of the system. Credit: Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge

A unique stage of planetary system evolution has been imaged by astronomers, showing fast-moving carbon monoxide gas flowing away from a star system over 400 light years away, a discovery that provides an opportunity to study how our own solar system developed.


Astronomers have detected fast-moving carbon monoxide gas flowing away from a young, low-mass star: a unique stage of planetary system evolution which may provide insight into how our own solar system evolved and suggests that the way systems develop may be more complicated than previously thought.

Although it remains unclear how the gas is being ejected so fast, the team of researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, believe it may be produced from icy comets being vaporized in the star’s asteroid belt. The results will be presented at the Five Years After HL Tau virtual conference in December.

The detection was made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, as part of a survey of young ‘class III’ stars, reported in an earlier paper. Some of these class III stars are surrounded by debris disks, which are believed to be formed by the ongoing collisions of comets, asteroids and other solid objects, known as planetesimals, in the outer reaches of recently formed planetary systems. The leftover dust and debris from these collisions absorbs light from their central stars and re-radiate that energy as a faint glow that can be studied with ALMA.

In the inner regions of planetary systems, the processes of planet formation are expected to result in the loss of all the hottest dust, and class IIII stars are those that are left with—at most—dim, cold dust. These faint belts of cold dust are similar to the known debris disks seen around other stars, similar to the Kuiper belt in our own solar system, which is known to host much larger asteroids and comets.

In the survey, the star in question, ‘NO Lup’, which is about 70% the mass of our sun, was found to have a faint, low-mass dusty disk, but it was the only class III star where carbon monoxide gas was detected, a first for this type of young star with ALMA. While it is known that many young stars still host the gas-rich planet-forming disks they are born with, NO Lup is more evolved, and might have been expected to have lost this primordial gas after its planets had formed.

While the detection of carbon monoxide gas is rare, what made the observation unique was the scale and speed of the gas, which prompted a follow-up study to explore its motion and origins.

“Just detecting carbon monoxide gas was exciting, since no other young stars of this type had been previously imaged by ALMA,” said first author Joshua Lovell, a Ph.D.

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Here’s why Tom Brady is already impressed with what Patrick Mahomes has accomplished in young career



Tom Brady et al. wearing costumes


© Provided by CBS Sports


Tom Brady and Patrick Mahomes are set to meet for the fourth time Sunday, having already played in three epic duels where the six-time Super Bowl champion has emerged victorious twice. Brady has watched Mahomes evolve into the game’s best quarterback, along with becoming the reigning Super Bowl MVP in leading the Kansas City Chiefs to a fourth-quarter comeback for the ages. 

Mahomes is putting up even better numbers in 2020 than his MVP season, and he’s the fastest player ever to 10,000 passing yards and 100 touchdown passes. Needless to say, the NFL’s all-time passing touchdown leader is impressed. 

“He’s a terrific player, obviously, being league MVP a few years ago. Fifty touchdowns is pretty hard to do – there’s not many guys who have done that,” Brady said. “To continue that last year with the Super Bowl championship and playing at an extremely high level this year – he’s just getting more and more comfortable. So much about playing quarterback is having experience, learning from year-to-year [and] improving your routine. 

“Watching the last time he was out there playing, you give him a chance to win and he takes advantage of it and leads the team down there. He does a tremendous job.”

As Brady prepares set to pass the torch to Mahomes, the Chiefs quarterback doesn’t view himself on the same popularity scale as Brady. Mahomes continues to be himself as he becomes a global icon. 

“I don’t know if I’m on his level. He’s someone that’s a global star and so for me I just try to be myself,” Mahomes said. “I just go out there every single day and put in the work and try to win football games and all that other stuff kind of comes with it. For me, I just try to be a normal guy and live it up with my teammates and have fun doing it.”

Mahomes is the front-runner for MVP honors through 10 games, putting up similar numbers to his first MVP campaign in 2018. Through 10 games this season, Mahomes has completed 67.9% of his passes for 3,035 yards with 27 touchdowns to just two interceptions and a 114.3 passer rating. Through 10 games in 2018, Mahomes has completed 67% of his passes for 3,150 yards with 31 touchdowns to seven interceptions and a 117.4 passer rating. 

Mahomes has the most passing yards (12,447), passing touchdowns (103), and pass completions (978) in NFL history through a player’s first 40 starts. His 110.3 passer rating is the highest in league history and his 20 interceptions are the fewest for any quarterback through 40 starts. 

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Yanire Valdez Monge, the young woman from Sonora selected to participate in a NASA project

The student confessed that since she was little it has been her dream to work at NASA, so she has worked hard to achieve it.

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This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


At just 19 years old, the third semester student of the Mechatronics Engineering career at the Hermosillo Technological Institute (ITH) was chosen to participate in NASA’s International Air and Space Program 2021.

He detailed the following through social networks: “Since I was little my dream has always been to work for NASA, that is why I have always studied a lot and worked hard.”

Similarly, he mentioned that he does not want to miss this great opportunity and that he needs support to raise the cost of the program, which is $ 3,500.

Through his Facebook account, Yanire published a flyer in which he indicates a bank account in which contributions can be made so that he can fulfill his dream of attending the NASA project. In the same way, the young woman mentions that activities will be carried out in the future to support her. She still says that sharing her publication is of great help to her, since that way she reaches more people.

Congratulating in advance, he announced the account where contributions can be sent:

BBVA 277-565-3657 or with Clabe Interbancaria 0127 6002 7756 536579 in the name of Frelani Valdez.

Image Yanire Valdez

What is the International Air and Space Program?

It is a five-day educational program that involves teamwork, problem solving, and communication between NASA students and expert engineers to adapt and solve any unexpected problems.

A total of 60 students will participate in the International Air and Space Program 2021, during these five days, the young people will develop a project together with a team. Subsequently, the winning work of the program will be applied to NASA. Yanire is not the only one who was selected, since other students already have the project pass, such as Michel Molina and Francisco Trejo.

Image: TecNM Campus Hermosillo

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Antonio Gibson’s career day shines a spotlight on Washington’s promising young core

After Antonio Gibson got the edge, after he knew he could outrace the defense to the pylon, he allowed himself a glance back. The rookie running back saw Dallas Cowboys safety Donovan Wilson. In moments like these, when he was putting the exclamation point on a win, Gibson usually threw up the peace sign. But this time, he switched the ball from his right hand to his left and waved, a farewell to the Cowboys, a hello to the national TV audience, a swaggering statement about what this team believes it can be.



a group of football players on a field: Washington Football Team running back Antonio Gibson waves goodbye as he runs past Dallas Cowboys safety Donovan Wilson during Thursday's win. (AP Photo/Roger Steinman)


© Roger Steinman/AP
Washington Football Team running back Antonio Gibson waves goodbye as he runs past Dallas Cowboys safety Donovan Wilson during Thursday’s win. (AP Photo/Roger Steinman)

For all their miscues and mistakes, the Washington Football Team has proven to be a tough and resilient unit — and the promise finally shone through in the 41-16 Thanksgiving thumping. This was the clearest example yet that Coach Ron Rivera is molding the team in the image he said he would, and the play of several of his young players — Gibson, wide receiver Terry McLaurin, defensive end Montez Sweat — illustrated it.

What Gibson said after the game perhaps best embodies the mind-set of a team that, at 4-7, jumped into first place for the NFC East.

“Our record isn’t the best; our conference isn’t the best; but we’re still in it,” Gibson said. “That gives us hope. If we can make the playoffs, why not?”

After a career day — 25 touches, 137 yards, three touchdowns — Gibson couldn’t help but think back to November 2019. He was at Memphis then, and he set a school record against then-No. 14 Southern Methodist with 386 all-purpose yards, including a 50-yard receiving touchdown, a 78-yard rushing touchdown and a 97-yard kickoff return touchdown. He couldn’t believe the symmetry, another breakout game on another national stage against another team from Dallas.

“It’s the story of my life,” he said. “Every time the spotlight come on, it seems like God’s always watching on me. … The SMU game put me on the map.”

Four takeaways from Washington’s 41-16 blowout win over Dallas

Since then, no one embodies the progress and maturation of the team better than Gibson. Washington drafted Gibson in the third round as a project, a young weapon who had played a little running back and a little receiver in two seasons of Division I. Rivera compared him to Carolina’s Christian McCaffrey, the league’s highest-paid running back, and put him in the running backroom full time.

Early in the year, Gibson looked like a receiver playing running back. He missed holes; he misjudged linemen; he confused protections. Slowly, though, he made strides. His role expanded, and he lined up in two-back formations with J.D. McKissic. He used his athleticism to help the Air Coryell-based offense, uniquely dependent on running backs, turning check-downs into first downs.

On Thursday, Gibson’s progress was evident. He proved too tough for one tackler in

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