Toyoda Gosei Invests in Ball Wave, a Startup from Tohoku University

Toyoda Gosei Invests in Ball Wave, a Startup from Tohoku University

Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. (TOKYO:7282) has invested1 in Ball Wave Inc., a startup from Tohoku University that develops practical applications of ball SAW sensors.2 These sensors use natural collimation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs), a physical phenomenon predicted and experimentally verified by researchers at Tohoku University, and can instantly detect various kinds of matter in air and other gases at the nanoscale.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201129005111/en/

Ball SAW sensor (Graphic: Business Wire)

Toyoda Gosei and Ball Wave will leverage Toyoda Gosei’s surface treatment technologies, such as painting and plating technology cultivated in the development and production of automotive interiors and exteriors, to achieve coatings for better ball SAW sensor performance. In the future, the two companies aim to develop a sensor that can detect viruses in the air with a view to combining it with Toyoda Gosei’s deep UV LED technology that can eliminate the novel coronavirus and other viruses.

Toyoda Gosei will continue to tackle social issues through collaboration with startups that are promising for synergy with its core technologies.

*1

100 million yen was invested in November 2020.

*2

Ball Wave has commercialized devices such as a high-performance trace moisture sensor that can be used in semiconductor manufacturing processes and drying rooms.

Company outline of Ball Wave

Company name

Ball Wave Inc.

Headquarters

Tohoku University Business Incubator T-Biz 501, 6-6-40, Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi

President & CEO

Dr. Shingo Akao

Founded

November, 2015

Capital

JPY100 million (as of October, 2020)

 

Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd.

Takatomo Abe

[email protected]

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201129005111/en/

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Toyoda Gosei Invests in Ball Wave, a Startup from Tohoku University – Press Release

KIYOSU, Japan–(Business Wire)–Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. (TOKYO:7282) has invested1 in Ball Wave Inc., a startup from Tohoku University that develops practical applications of ball SAW sensors.2 These sensors use natural collimation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs), a physical phenomenon predicted and experimentally verified by researchers at Tohoku University, and can instantly detect various kinds of matter in air and other gases at the nanoscale.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201129005111/en/

Ball SAW sensor (Graphic: Business Wire)

Ball SAW sensor (Graphic: Business Wire)

Toyoda Gosei and Ball Wave will leverage Toyoda Gosei’s surface treatment technologies, such as painting and plating technology cultivated in the development and production of automotive interiors and exteriors, to achieve coatings for better ball SAW sensor performance. In the future, the two companies aim to develop a sensor that can detect viruses in the air with a view to combining it with Toyoda Gosei’s deep UV LED technology that can eliminate the novel coronavirus and other viruses.

Toyoda Gosei will continue to tackle social issues through collaboration with startups that are promising for synergy with its core technologies.

*1

100 million yen was invested in November 2020.

*2

Ball Wave has commercialized devices such as a high-performance trace moisture sensor that can be used in semiconductor manufacturing processes and drying rooms.

Company outline of Ball Wave

Company name

Ball Wave Inc.

Headquarters

Tohoku University Business Incubator T-Biz 501, 6-6-40, Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi

President & CEO

Dr. Shingo Akao

Founded

November, 2015

Capital

JPY100 million (as of October, 2020)

 

Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd.

Takatomo Abe

[email protected]

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Measuring The Height Of Mount Everest : Short Wave : NPR

Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak, seen from Syangboche in Nepal.

Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images


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Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images

Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak, seen from Syangboche in Nepal.

Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images

For three years, Roxanne Vogel trained, single-mindedly, with one number in mind: 29,029 feet.

She slept in a special tent, outside her home in California, that simulated high altitude. She summited dozens of peaks, on nearly every continent. And finally, last year, Vogel climbed up to 29,029 feet in the Himalayan mountains – the top of Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak.

“That’s the closest to heaven, or the closest to outer space, that I will ever get on this Earth,” Vogel, 35, told NPR. “It’s kind of life-changing, when you’re up there.”

Roxanne Vogel, a US mountaineer, atop Everest on May 22, 2019.

Courtesy of Roxanne Vogel


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Roxanne Vogel, a US mountaineer, atop Everest on May 22, 2019.

Courtesy of Roxanne Vogel

(And Roxanne didn’t just climb Everest; she set a speed record doing it. In May 2019, she traveled round-trip from her California home, to Everest’s peak and back, in just 14 days.)

But that number — 29,029 feet, from sea level to summit – to which Vogel dedicated so many years of training, may not be the actual height of Everest – or at least not for long. Because the mountain is changing.

Scientists say Everest is getting taller, over time, because of plate tectonics. As the Indian plate slips under the Eurasian plate, it uplifts the Himalayas. But earthquakes can reduce their height in an instant. After a 7.8-magnitude quake in 2015 killed thousands, including climbers on Everest, scientists suspect the mountain got shorter.

So China and Nepal, on whose borders Everest stands, decided it’s time to re-measure Everest.

This spring, with the climbing season canceled for COVID-19, China sent a survey team up to Everest’s summit, carrying GPS receivers. Last year, Nepal did the same. The two countries have been analyzing their findings for months, and are expected to release them any day now – possibly as early as this weekend. Calculating that number has evolved as our technology has, but the science remains complicated.

SIR GEORGE EVEREST, AND AN INDIAN MATHEMATICIAN

Back in the 19th century, when Sir George Everest – a Briton – was the Surveyor General of India, under colonial rule, they used trigonometry to measure mountains, with machines called theodolites. They’re optical instruments – sort of a cross between a telescope and a compass – that are used to measure angles between visible points on the horizon, and vertical planes. Municipal surveyors still use tripod versions of them.

Theodolites used in earlier expeditions to measure Everest.

Courtesy of B. Nagarajan and the Geodetic & Research Branch Museum, Survey of India


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Courtesy of B. Nagarajan and the Geodetic & Research Branch Museum, Survey of India

Theodolites used in

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New Wave: Enters into Partnership with the University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica for Medicinal Drug Discovery

TORONTO, Nov. 26, 2020 /CNW/ – NEW WAVE HOLDINGS CORP. (the “Company” or “New Wave”) (CSE: SPOR) (FWB: 0XM2) (OTC: TRMND) an investment issuer that provides capital and support services, announced it has entered into a joint venture with The University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica to conduct drug discovery and highlight knowledge of medicinal plants in Jamaica.

New Wave Holdings Corp. Logo (CNW Group/New Wave Holdings Corp.)

The purpose of this joint venture/partnership is to develop techniques using local microclimate conditions and local research and commercial advantages to explore various natural products and patent opportunities and to conduct drug discovery and highlight knowledge of medicinal plants in Jamaica.

The Parties wish to explore opportunities for:

  • research and development of therapeutic drugs and natural health products that are derived from local plants and fungi;
  • commercial activities that can exploit patents, and other research results, concerning local biodiversity;
  • advancing the knowledge of medicinal plants in Jamaica;
  • increase awareness of medicinal plant health

Under the terms of the strategic partnership, New Wave Holdings will provide capital, resources and further support in drug discovery through the University faculty and facilities.

UWI will undertake research and the objective will be to highlight and further develop various components and/or compounds in early drug discovery stages and explore various plants and fungi that show significant results in the following areas: Cancerous properties, Diabetes, Hypercholesterolemia, and Inflammation. Research at the Facility will be led by various scientific professors that specialize in the key areas listed above.

Daniel Fox, CEO New Wave Holdings comments: “This will be a joint effort between New Wave and UWI brain trust to enhance awareness, innovate new remedies of therapy, and shed light on the medicinal plants and their ultimate consumer health benefits.”

Both New Wave and UWI agree to work together under a model where UWI provides research services (personnel and facilities) that are funded by New Wave. The details of these research projects, the funding needed for each, the ownership of the Intellectual Property that results and the licencing terms if any would be negotiated on a project-by-project basis. 

ABOUT NEW WAVE HOLDINGS CORP.

New Wave Holdings Corp. (CSE: SPOR, FWB: 0XM2, OTC: TRMND) is an investment issuer focused on the burgeoning psychedelic sector and support for adaptive and progressive mental health products and therapies. In the psychedelic sector, New Wave will focus on supporting research on active psychedelic compounds, creation of consumer products based on functional mushrooms, and developing an IP portfolio focusing on psilocybin, LSD, MDMA, and ketamine derived treatments for neuropsychiatric diseases. New Wave also contains various health and beauty products within its portfolio of non-psychoactive plants and fungi as it continues to expand its product distribution through vertical integration to provide end to end solutions while capturing a high margin business model.

Investors interested in connecting with New Wave Holdings can learn more about the company and contact the team at https://newwavecorp.com

ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY OF WEST INDIES, MONA, JAMAICA 

The University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona campus offers world

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Direct visualization of quantum dots reveals shape of quantum wave function

Direct visualization of quantum dots reveals shape of quantum wave function
Visualization of quantum dots in bilayer graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy reveals a three-fold symmetry. In this three-dimensional image, the peaks represent sites of high amplitude in the waveform of the trapped electrons. Credit: Zhehao Ge, Frederic Joucken, and Jairo Velasco Jr.

Trapping and controlling electrons in bilayer graphene quantum dots yields a promising platform for quantum information technologies. Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now achieved the first direct visualization of quantum dots in bilayer graphene, revealing the shape of the quantum wave function of the trapped electrons.


The results, published November 23 in Nano Letters, provide important fundamental knowledge needed to develop quantum information technologies based on bilayer graphene quantum dots.

“There has been a lot of work to develop this system for quantum information science, but we’ve been missing an understanding of what the electrons look like in these quantum dots,” said corresponding author Jairo Velasco Jr., assistant professor of physics at UC Santa Cruz.

While conventional digital technologies encode information in bits represented as either 0 or 1, a quantum bit, or qubit, can represent both states at the same time due to quantum superposition. In theory, technologies based on qubits will enable a massive increase in computing speed and capacity for certain types of calculations.

A variety of systems, based on materials ranging from diamond to gallium arsenide, are being explored as platforms for creating and manipulating qubits. Bilayer graphene (two layers of graphene, which is a two-dimensional arrangement of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice) is an attractive material because it is easy to produce and work with, and quantum dots in bilayer graphene have desirable properties.

“These quantum dots are an emergent and promising platform for quantum information technology because of their suppressed spin decoherence, controllable quantum degrees of freedom, and tunability with external control voltages,” Velasco said.

Understanding the nature of the quantum dot wave function in bilayer graphene is important because this basic property determines several relevant features for quantum information processing, such as the electron energy spectrum, the interactions between electrons, and the coupling of electrons to their environment.

Velasco’s team used a method he had developed previously to create quantum dots in monolayer graphene using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). With the graphene resting on an insulating hexagonal boron nitride crystal, a large voltage applied with the STM tip creates charges in the boron nitride that serve to electrostatically confine electrons in the bilayer graphene.

“The electric field creates a corral, like an invisible electric fence, that traps the electrons in the quantum dot,” Velasco explained.

The researchers then used the scanning tunneling microscope to image the electronic states inside and outside of the corral. In contrast to theoretical predictions, the resulting images showed a broken rotational symmetry, with three peaks instead of the expected concentric rings.

“We see circularly symmetric rings in monolayer graphene, but in bilayer graphene the quantum dot states have a three-fold symmetry,” Velasco said. “The peaks represent sites of high amplitude

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Exploring Bose-Einstein Condensate And Superfluids : Short Wave : NPR

MIT’s Martin Zwierlein works with ultracold atomic gases. Within these glowing clouds of atoms, “superfluid” states of matter form.

Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group


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Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group

MIT’s Martin Zwierlein works with ultracold atomic gases. Within these glowing clouds of atoms, “superfluid” states of matter form.

Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group

Sharpen your pencils. Get out your notebook. Today, we are unveiling a new series called “Back To School.”

In these episodes, we take a concept you were taught in school and go a little deeper with it. Short Wave reporter Emily Kwong and host Maddie Sofia explore OTHER states of matter — beyond solid, liquid, gas, and plasma.

Have you heard of Bose-Einstein condensate? Or superfluids? It’s your lucky day. We speak with Martin Zwierlein, professor of physics at Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT), about his work with ultracold quantum gases and observing superfluid states of matter.

To learn more about Martin’s Ultracold Quantum Gases Group at MIT, you can visit their lab website here.

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This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Viet Le, and fact-checked by Ariela Zebede.

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A wave of evictions is on the horizon. What impact could they have on kids’ education?

There were new additions to classrooms when schools opened this fall. There were plastic shields and cloth facemasks, hand sanitizer and login instructions when learning went online. But something was missing — tens of thousands of students. 

The coronavirus pandemic has pushed kids out of school for various reasons: health concerns, a parent losing a job causing the family to move, a lack of internet or devices for virtual learning. Because there is no national database, 60 Minutes compiled enrollment data from 78 of the largest school districts in the country and found nearly a quarter of a million students did not showed up when school began. 

Now, social workers who have spent the last three months searching for those kids expect their job is about to get much harder. A national pause on most evictions is set to expire at the end of the year, and without those protections, children without a home could translate to more students missing from the classroom. 

“While we’ve had an increase in homelessness, it’s going to get much, much worse,” said Laura Tucker, a social worker for Florida’s Hillsborough County School District. “Because people are going to become homeless that never intended to become homeless, never thought it would happen in their lifetime.”

THE NATIONAL EVICTION MORATORIUM 

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in September issued a national eviction moratorium that temporarily stops landlords from evicting tenants who have lost income because of the pandemic and have fallen behind on rent. It is set to expire next month, on December 31. 

Congress had previously included a limited ban on evictions in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. That measure, which expired in July, only paused evictions in federally subsidized housing. The CDC’s order protects everyone living in one of the nation’s approximate 44 million rental households.

The CDC’s moratorium draws on the Public Health Service Act of 1944, which grants the Department of Health and Human Services authority to respond to public health emergencies. The order is meant, in part, to prevent homelessness, which can increase the spread of COVID-19. 

The extent to which evictions can increase infections is evident in a new study set to be published next week, which 60 Minutes previewed. The study, led by Dr. Kathryn Leifheit from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, found that evictions led to a total of 433,700 excess COVID-19 cases and 10,700 additional deaths in the U.S. from the beginning of the pandemic until the CDC’s national order in September.

The national ban, however, does not stop landlords from evicting all residents. Among other requirements, tenants must sign a form that states they have lost income due to the pandemic and have made their best effort to apply for federal housing aid. 

The order also does not prohibit late fees or absolve tenants of any back rent they owe, and it does not establish any kind of financial assistance fund to help renters get caught up. Because of this,

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LIGO and Virgo announce 39 new gravitational wave discoveries during first half of third observing run

LIGO and Virgo announce 39 new gravitational wave discoveries during first half of third observing run
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration released a catalog of results from the first half of its third observing run (O3a). This shows the masses of the black holes and neutron stars in the 50 gravitational wave events detected to date. Credit: LIGO-Virgo/Frank Elavsky, Aaron Geller/Northwestern

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration released a catalog of results from the first half of its third observing run (O3a), and scientists have detected more than three times as many gravitational waves than the first two runs combined. Gravitational waves were first detected in 2015 and are ripples in time and space produced by merging black holes and/or neutron stars. Several researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology’s Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation (CCRG) were heavily involved in analyzing the gravitational waves and understanding their significance.


The catalog details 39 new gravitational wave events detected during O3a, bringing the total to 50, and several of the newly detected binaries have unique properties that expand our understanding of binary black hole formation. O3a uncovered the largest and smallest binary black holes to date, ranging from 150 times the size of our sun to just 3 times larger. O3a also detected the first binary black hole confidently formed from highly asymmetrical black holes as well as several binary black holes with unique spin properties.

Jacob Lange ’18 MS (astrophysical sciences and technology), ’20 Ph.D. (astrophysical sciences and technology) worked on the parameter estimation part of the analysis, which identifies important characteristics about each gravitational wave event, including the masses of the black holes or neutron stars involved, their spin, distance from Earth and position in the sky. While he was a Ph.D. student at RIT, he helped develop parameter estimation algorithms that were faster than conventional methods and used for many of the events released in the catalog. Lange, who is now a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University’s Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics, said that improvements to the sensors and parameter estimation techniques have yielded increasingly unique findings that challenge our understanding of the universe.

“We’re seeing much more complex events where nature’s really showing us its fascinating side,” said Lange. “We’ll be able to learn much more interesting physics and astrophysics from these detections. The more we build up this catalog of events, the more we can start making statements about the overall population.”

Daniel Wysocki ’18 MS (astrophysical sciences and technology), ’20 Ph.D. (astrophysical sciences and technology) worked on analyzing the population properties of black holes following O3a. Wysocki, now a postdoctoral researcher at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, said that we are gaining a clearer picture about what typical black holes look like, how many exist, how the population of black holes has changed as the universe evolved, and other important properties.

“This catalog represents a significant increase in sample size from our previous release,” said Wysocki. “It’s like a census that provides data for people to see if their physical models are consistent with what happens in the

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Bumper crop of black holes in new gravitational wave paper

Bumper crop of black holes in new gravitational wave paper
LIGO team member entering one of the LIGO Livingston detector chambers. Credit: University of Portsmouth

Only a few years ago, scientists the world over celebrated as the first-ever gravitational waves were detected—confirming a long-held scientific theory and opening up an entirely new field of research.


Now, the international research team responsible for detecting gravitational waves has announced a further 39 gravitational wave events, bringing the total number of confirmed detections to 50.

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo Collaborations, which include researchers from the University of Portsmouth, have today published a series of papers that record events including the mergers of binary black holes, binary neutron stars and, possibly, neutron star-black holes.

These events were recorded during the first six months of the LIGO and Virgo detectors’ third Observing Run.

Dr. Andrew Williamson, from the University of Portsmouth’s Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, said: “This new catalogue of discoveries includes 39 new gravitational wave events observed between 1 April and 1 October 2019. That’s more than one discovery per week.

“Most of these were produced by merging pairs of black holes, but it also includes the second ever discovery of a colliding pair of neutron stars, and possibly the first discovery of a black hole and neutron star pair merging. Neutron stars are the extremely dense remains of dead stars, weighing more than our Sun but crushed into something the size of a city, less than 15 miles across.

Bumper crop of black holes in new gravitational wave paper
The inside of the LIGO Livingston interferometer. Credit: University of Portsmouth

“Combined with 11 discoveries made before 2019, we have now discovered 50 gravitational wave events, with many more surely to come. We now have enough events that we can really begin to answer questions like: ‘just how common are merging pairs of black holes?’ and ‘what does the population of black holes look like?'”

UK scientists have designed and built instrumentation for the LIGO detectors, which are based in the United States, and have contributed to the analysis and interpretation of the data collected throughout the three observing runs. The UK’s contribution to the collaborations is funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

With this new, expanded catalogue of detections, scientists are provided with a wealth of black hole data to rigorously test Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity and give new insight into how black holes and neutron stars come into being.

Researchers at Portsmouth had a leading role in planning, building and running one of the main analyses that detected the gravitational waves included in this catalogue and Ph.D. student, Simone Mozzon, spent three months working at one of the LIGO detectors in Louisiana during the course of these observations.

Simone said: “I was lucky enough to work at LIGO in Livingston at the end of 2019 where my role was to reduce the impact of external noise sources to the gravitational wave data. LIGO detectors are extremely complex and sensitive, and each component has to be isolated from external noise disturbances like ground motion due

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Building A Better Clock With Quantum Physics : Short Wave : NPR

Conceptual artwork of quantum entanglement, one of the consequences of quantum theory. Two particles will appear to be linked across space and time, with changes to one of the particles (such as an observation or measurement) affecting the other one.

Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra


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Conceptual artwork of quantum entanglement, one of the consequences of quantum theory. Two particles will appear to be linked across space and time, with changes to one of the particles (such as an observation or measurement) affecting the other one.

Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Imagine building a better clock — with entangled atoms. Sound difficult? Not for Monika Schleier-Smith, associate professor of physics at Stanford University and 2020 MacArthur Fellow.

Schleier-Smith studies quantum mechanics, the theory that explains the nature of really small things: atoms, photons, and individual particles (e.g. electrons). Quantum mechanics is responsible for innovations in computers, telecommunications, and medicine. And those innovations often start in a lab.

Today on Short Wave, Schleier-Smith takes us into her laboratory — of lasers and mirrors — to break down what’s at work. We discuss her 2010 paper in the journal Physical Review Letters, in which she and her colleagues demonstrated the first atomic clock that harnessed the properties of quantum entanglement for greater precision.

Currently, the Schleier-Smith lab is venturing deeper into the quantum realm. They’re engineering systems to control interactions between particles that are long-ranged or non-local, which has implications for enabling new computational paradigms and building table-top simulations of quantum gravity.

To see all of this year’s MacArthur Fellows, click here.

This episode was produced by Brit Hanson, fact-checked by Ariela Zebede, and edited by Viet Le.

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