Donald Trump says he will leave White House if electoral college votes for Joe Biden | US news

Donald Trump has said that he will leave the White House in January if the electoral college votes for Democratic president-elect Joe Biden, in the closest the outgoing president has come to conceding defeat.

Biden won the presidential election with 306 electoral college votes – many more than the 270 required – to Trump’s 232. Biden also leads Trump by more than 6 million in the popular vote tally.

Trump has so far defied tradition by refusing to concede defeat, instead making a series of baseless claims about alleged ballot fraud and launching legal attempts to challenge the outcomes in several states such Pennsylvania and Michigan.

But desperate efforts by Trump and his aides to overturn results in key states, either by lawsuits or by pressuring state legislators, have failed.

Speaking to reporters on the Thanksgiving holiday, Trump said if Biden – who is due to be sworn in on 20 January – was certified the election winner by the electoral college, he would depart the White House.

Trump’s comments, made to reporters at the White House after speaking to troops during the traditional Thanksgiving Day address to US service members, appear to take him one step nearer to admitting defeat.

Asked if he would leave the White House if the college vote went against him, Trump said: “Certainly I will. And you know that,” adding that: “If they do, they’ve made a mistake.”

Donald Trump arrives for the event on Thursday night.



Donald Trump arrives for the event on Thursday night. Photograph: Erin Scott/Reuters

However, Trump said it would be “a very hard thing to concede” and declined to say whether he would attend Biden’s inauguration, which is due to take place on 20 January.

It was the first time he had taken questions from reporters since election day, and at times he turned combative, calling one reporter a “lightweight” and telling him “don’t talk to me like that”.

Trump’s administration has already given the green light for a formal transition to get underway. But Trump took issue with Biden moving forward.

“I think it’s not right that he’s trying to pick a Cabinet,” Trump said, even though officials from both teams are already working together to get Biden’s team up to speed.

At one point he urged reporters not to allow Biden the credit for pending coronavirus vaccines.

“Don’t let him take credit for the vaccines because the vaccines were me and I pushed people harder than they’ve ever been pushed before,” he said.

As for whether or not he plans to formally declare his candidacy to run again in 2024 – as he has discussed with aides – Trump he didn’t “want to talk about 2024 yet.”

In late-night tweets, Trump complained that the media had not covered his news conference in the way he had wanted, saying the main point he had tried to make was that he won the election. Twitter flagged his comments.

The electoral college is due to meet on 14 December when each state’s nominated electors will cast their votes

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Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District votes to strip healthcare benefits for striking teachers

The Board of Education for Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District (CH-UH) has voted to strip healthcare benefits from striking teachers, counselors, nurses, and other school support professionals, the Cleveland Heights Teachers Union (CHTU) revealed in a release on Friday.

RELATED: More local news from WKYC

Last week, the CHTU filed a notice to strike following months of negotiations between the union and school district on a new contract. The CHTU’s strike is set to begin on Wednesday, Dec. 2.

“This outrageous move by our Board of Education is a heavy-handed attempt to quash our collective action by taking away our health insurance during the peak of a global pandemic,” CHTU President Karen Rego said in a release. “We made the hard decision to plan for a strike to protect the quality health insurance that we have gained over the years by forgoing wage increases, and now the district is seeking to punish us by eliminating our healthcare altogether.”

In a statement, CH-UH City School District Superintendent Elizabeth Kirby and CH-UH City School District Board of Education President Jodi Sourini said that the district remains committed to resolving its issues with the Union. They also noted “when public school teachers choose to go on strike, they are knowingly walking away from wages and benefits.”

“That is the definition of a strike – employees choose to walk away from their compensation in order to influence terms and conditions of employment,” the statement reads. “Ceasing wages and benefits is required for public sector employees in Ohio under state law. We sincerely hope Union leadership informed its members of this and what choosing to strike means.”

The school district also noted that employees are eligible to continue their health benefits through COBRA during the strike, but will be responsible for paying for the coverage. The union, meanwhile, stated that its strike comes after “the district unilaterally imposed the terms of their final contract proposal, which will raise healthcare premiums to 250% of the current rate, while also reducing other compensation by 1%. For many CHTU members that adds up to a $3,000-$5,000 loss in total compensation.”

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Trump says for first time he’ll leave office if Electoral College votes for Biden

President Donald Trump said for the first time Thursday he will leave office if the Electoral College votes for President-elect Joe Biden but made clear he’s not prepared to concede.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie sitting at a table


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“Certainly I will, and you know that,” Trump said when asked by a reporter about leaving the White House if Biden is declared the winner on December 14. “I will and, you know that.”

“It’s going to be a very hard thing to concede because we know there was massive fraud,” Trump said without evidence.

“As to whether or not we can get this apparatus moving quickly — because time isn’t on our side, everything else is on our side, facts are on our side, this was a massive fraud.”

The President falsely added that if Biden is declared the winner, the Electoral College, “made a mistake, cause this election was a fraud.” Pressed on his comments, Trump snapped at the reporter. “Don’t talk to me that way. I’m the President of the United States. Don’t ever talk to the president that way,” he said.

Video: Here’s what Giuliani’s former colleagues say about him now (CNN)

Here’s what Giuliani’s former colleagues say about him now

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Thursday was the first time Trump has taken questions from reporters since the election.

Since CNN and other outlets projected Biden as the winner earlier this month, Trump has refused to accept the results, instead pushing baseless conspiracies that his second term is being stolen and launching a legal effort to overturn results.

This includes falsely claiming during an election night address that he had already won reelection, that he had already won states that were actually still up in the air at the time and that his opponents were perpetuating a fraud.

In response, Biden campaign spokesperson Andrew Bates said in a statement earlier this month, “the United States government is perfectly capable of escorting trespassers out of the White House.”

To this point, the Trump campaign’s lawsuits have been repeatedly dismissed or dropped, and earlier this week, the General Services Administration informed Biden that the Trump administration is ready to begin the formal transition process.

The GSA letter marked the first step the administration has taken to acknowledge Trump’s defeat. The President, however, tweeted moments after the letter was reported: “Our case STRONGLY continues, we will keep up the good fight, and I believe we will prevail!”

He echoed that message throughout his rambling news conference Thursday following a Thanksgiving teleconference call with military members — an event US Presidents traditionally use to boost morale of service members stationed abroad during the holidays and remind the country of their service.

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Trump says he would ‘certainly’ leave White House once Electoral College votes for Biden

USA TODAY’S coverage of the 2020 election and President-elect Joe Biden’s transition continues this week as states certify their vote counts. President Donald Trump has yet to concede the race but his administration cleared the way this week for Biden’s team to have access to federal resources and briefings during the transition.

Pres. Trump tweets ‘full pardon’ for ex-national security adviser Michael Flynn

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Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Trump defended his administration's child separation and immigration policies during the final 2020 presidential debate.


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President Trump defended his administration’s child separation and immigration policies during the final 2020 presidential debate.

Be sure to refresh this page often to get the latest information on the election and the transition.

Trump says he would ‘certainly’ leave White House once Electoral College votes for Biden

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President Donald Trump acknowledged for the first time Thursday that he would leave the White House if the Electoral College votes – as it will – to make Democrat Joe Biden the next president, but said it would be “very hard” to concede the contest.

“Certainly I will, and you know that,” Trump told reporters at the White House on Thursday when asked if he would leave the presidency once Biden is formally chosen by the electors.Taking questions from reporters for the first time since he lost the Nov. 3 election to Biden, Trump used the Thanksgiving appearance to level a new round of baseless claims about voting fraud, arguing without evidence that Republicans were “robbed.”

Though he indicated he would continue to fight the outcome in states such as Pennsylvania and Michigan, Trump’s remarks were the first time he recognized the need for a peaceful handover of power. States must certify their votes before the Electoral College meets on Dec. 14 — many already have — and resolve all challenges to the outcome by Dec. 8.

Trump, who appeared as part of an annual holiday tradition of speaking to U.S. troops, said he did not want to say yet whether he would attend Biden’s inauguration.

The president also said he plans to get back on the campaign trail soon to help Republicans running in two critical runoff elections. Trump said he would likely get out to campaign for Georgia Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue on December 5.

“It’s going to be a very hard thing to concede,” Trump told reporters when asked about what he will do if the Electoral College elects Biden.

“If they do, they made a mistake,” Trump said of that outcome.

John Fritze

Bidens thank frontline workers battling COVID pandemic 

President-elect Joe Biden and future first lady Jill Biden said in a message to Americans on Thanksgiving Day that though 2020 has had increased challenges for many across the country and families may not be able to gather as usual, there is still much to be grateful for.

“We’re going to get through this together, even if we have to be apart,” the Bidens wrote in

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Donald Trump says he will leave White House if electoral college votes for Joe Biden | Donald Trump

Donald Trump has said that he will leave the White House when the electoral college votes for Democratic president-elect Joe Biden in the closest the outgoing president has come to conceding defeat.

Biden won the presidential election with 306 electoral college votes – many more than the 270 required – to Trump’s 232. Biden also leads Trump by more than 6 million in the popular vote tally.

Trump has so far defied tradition by refusing to concede defeat, instead making a series of baseless claims about alleged ballot fraud and launching legal attempts to challenge the outcomes in several states such Pennsylvania and Michigan.

Trump’s comments, made to reporters at the White House after speaking to troops during the traditional Thanksgiving Day address to US service members, appear to take him one step nearer to admitting defeat and might allay fears that will continue fighting the result.

Asked if he would leave the White House if the college vote went against him, Trump said: “Certainly I will. And you know that. If they do, they made a mistake.

However, Trump said it would be “a very hard thing to concede” under the current circumstances and declined to say whether he would attend Biden’s inauguration, which is due to take place on 20 January.

“This election was a fraud,” Trump insisted, while offering no concrete evidence of such voting irregularities.

The electoral college is due to meet on 14 December when each state’s nominated electors will cast their votes for the winner of the state’s presidential ballot. The votes are officially counted by Congress on 6 January.

Some Republicans have floated the idea that they could ignore the popular vote and appoint pro-Trump electors to change the outcome in certain states, leading to concerns that the president might refuse to leave office.

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Trump says he will leave if electoral college votes for Biden

Though advisers have long said he would leave on Jan. 20, it was Trump’s first explicit commitment to vacate office if the vote did not go his way.

Trump said he planned to continue to make claims of fraud about the results and said, without evidence, that Biden could not have won close to 80 million votes. His legal team has been widely mocked — and has lost almost every claim in every state, as officials certify results for Biden.

“It’s going to be a very hard thing to concede,” he said of the election. Aides have privately said Trump will never concede that he lost.

Asked whether he would attend Biden’s inauguration, he demurred. “I know the answer,” he said, though he declined to provide it.

Even as most of his lawyers have quit and many campaign officials say the effort to overturn the election is going nowhere, Trump said it was going “very well.”

The president made the remarks in the Diplomatic Room of the White House after he spoke to soldiers across the world. The Thanksgiving session — an annual tradition for Trump — marked the first time he took questions since the election.

He planned to have dinner with his family at the White House on Thursday night and spent much of the day at his golf club in Virginia.

The president also said he planned to campaign in Georgia for two Republicans in Senate runoffs set for January. The races are key to the party keeping the majority. Trump said he may go as soon as Saturday, though a White House spokesman later said he meant next Saturday.

Republicans close to Trump have said he was largely uninterested in the runoffs until his Thursday appearance. He railed against Georgia officials, who he believes have not intervened enough as the state has counted ballots and certified results for Biden.

Trump’s continued rhetoric has worried Republicans working on the race, who fear his campaign against the election could discourage some supporters from voting.

“I’m very worried about that,” Trump said, when asked if Georgia’s Senate runoff elections would be legitimate.

“You have a fraudulent system,” he said he told Georgia’s Republican Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler. He said his supporters feared the race was illegitimate.

Trump continued to falsely claim that there had been widespread voter fraud in his election, without offering proof. And he again falsely said Republican poll watchers were not allowed to observe in Pennsylvania, though his lawyers have said in court that some were allowed to observe.

Aides say Trump has begun discussing a 2024 presidential bid, but he said on Thursday that he was still focused on 2020.

“I don’t think it’s right he’s trying to pick a Cabinet,” Trump said of Biden. Trump had blocked a presidential transition for several weeks but relented this week and allowed his team to go forward.

Trump also glancingly addressed the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed at least 262,000 people in the United States,

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Trump says he will leave the White House if Electoral College votes for Biden

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for the presentation (and pardoning) of the 73rd National Thanksgiving Turkey in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, U.S., November 24, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said on Thursday he will leave the White House if the Electoral College votes for Democratic President-elect Joe Biden.

In the nearest he has come to a concession, Republican Trump said if Biden is certified the election winner by the Electoral College he will depart the White House. Biden is due to be inaugurated on Jan. 20.

The Electoral College is due to meet on Dec. 14.

Trump made the comments at the White House after speaking to U.S. troops during the traditional Thanksgiving Day address to U.S. servicemembers.

Biden won the Nov. 3 presidential election with 306 Electoral College votes – many more than the 270 required – to Trump’s 232. Biden also leads Trump by more than 6 million in the popular vote tally.

Trump has so far refused to concede the election and continues to claim without evidence that the election was marred by widespread fraud, and that he and not Biden won it.

Reporting by Tim Reid, Editing by Rosalba O’Brien and Andrea Ricci

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Michigan formally certified its Electoral College votes for Biden, another blow to Trump’s attempt to overturn the election results



a car parked in a parking lot: Motorists participate during a drive-by rally to certify the presidential election results near the Capitol building in Lansing. Paul Sancya/AP


© Paul Sancya/AP
Motorists participate during a drive-by rally to certify the presidential election results near the Capitol building in Lansing. Paul Sancya/AP

  • Michigan’s four-member Board of State Canvassers voted on Monday to formally certify the state’s 16 Electoral College votes for President-elect Joe Biden.
  • Democrats Jeanette Bradshaw and Julie Matuzak and Republican Aaron Van Langevelde voted to certify, while Republican Norman Shinkle abstained. 
  • The board heard over three hours of testimony and public comments from current and former election officials, party officials, and members of the public before taking a vote on certification. 
  • Michigan’s statewide certification marks the president’s latest failure in overturning his electoral defeat.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Michigan’s four-member Board of State Canvassers voted on Monday to formally certify the state’s 16 Electoral College votes for President-elect Joe Biden, marking President Donald Trump’s latest failure overturn election results in key states. 

Biden won Michigan by 156,643 votes — a margin of 2.8 percentage points — over Trump, according to Decision Desk HQ. That result far surpasses the 10,704 vote margin by which Trump carried Michigan in 2016. 

After hearing over three hours of testimony from election and campaign officials, and members of the public, three members of the board — the minimum threshold required – voted to certify the results.

Both Democratic board members, Chairwoman Jeanette Bradshaw and Julie Matuzak, as well as Republican Aaron Van Langevelde voted in favor of certification. Republican Norman Shinkle abstained.

If the board had deadlocked along partisan lines, the matter would have immediately gone to the courts, which could then have ordered the board to certify the results, CNN reported.

A number of current and former election officials, including former state elections director Chris Thomas, former Detroit elections director Daniel Baxter, and former Board of State Canvassers member Jeff Timmer, testified in support of the board certifying the election.

Video: Wayne County Board of Canvassers member, “I’m confident that the election will be certified” (MSNBC)

Wayne County Board of Canvassers member, “I’m confident that the election will be certified”

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Current officials who were in favor of the move included the state’s Bureau of Elections director Jonathan Brater, Detriot City Clerk Janice Winfrey, Lansing City Clerk Chris Swope, Ingraham County Clerk Barb Byrum, and Livonia City Clerk Susan Nash. 

Laura Cox, representing the state Republican Party, and former GOP Senate candidate John James’ attorney, Charles Spies, testified in opposition and asked the board to delay certification pending further review of what they described as abnormalities in reporting of votes and exclusion of Republican poll observers. 

Van Langevelde appeared skeptical of arguments from GOP lawyers that the law gives the Board of State Canvassers authority to independently request audits and further review the results of the election before certification. A candidate can only request a recount after certification. 

“We can agree to disagree, but I think the law is on my side here,” Van Langevelde told Spiers, the James’ campaign lawyer. “Our duty

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Iowa Board of Education votes to limit student seclusion, restraint

The Iowa Board of Education has rescinded its current rules on student seclusion and restraint and replaced them with a more limited set of circumstances in which children can be confined at school.

Waiver requests for remote instruction are on the rise in Iowa

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The changes involve when children can be secluded, the size of the rooms they can be secluded in, and how schools should notify parents or guardians that their children were restrained.

The Board of Education’s unanimous vote Wednesday was a result of years of advocacy and three attempts in recent years to amend the state’s practices, which have sparked controversy because schools have used the rooms to hold students for a range of misbehavior and underreported how often they do.

In the lead-up to the 2020 election, all eyes are on Iowa. Get updates of all things Iowa politics delivered to your inbox.

In 2017, Iowa’s Department of Education determined the Iowa City school district violated state and federal law in its use of seclusion rooms. School officials stopped using them, focusing instead on other behavioral intervention.



a close up of a door: A seclusion room at Horn Elementary in Iowa City is shown on May 19, 2016.


© Iowa City Press-Citizen file photo
A seclusion room at Horn Elementary in Iowa City is shown on May 19, 2016.

In adopting the new policy, board members praised the collaboration between the Iowa Department of Education and organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union of Iowa and Disability Rights Iowa.

Mark Stringer, executive director of the ACLU of Iowa, said that many key amendments that advocates pursued are in the new rules, including “that seclusion and restraints are used only in emergency situations, are no more restrictive than necessary, are used only as a last resort, and are never used for the discipline or punishment of children.”

The rules allow educators to use seclusion and restraint when there’s a threat of “bodily injury.” Some stakeholders preferred that “serious physical” injury be the benchmark, but consensus favored the broader term, board members said.

Schools are also required to notify parents of the use of seclusion and restraint “as soon as is practical” or by the end of the school day, whichever comes first.

Additionally, the new rules mandate that seclusion rooms must be at least 56 square feet and at least 7 feet wide. Schools have five years to meet the necessary size requirements.

Still, educators and advocates agreed that there is more work to be done.

“We remain concerned about disparities in how students are disciplined in Iowa and across the country,” Stringer said during public comments. “Data show that restraint and seclusion are still disproportionately used on students with disabilities and students of color.”



a man wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Mark Stringer


© Special to the Register
Mark Stringer

According to U.S. Department of Education data from the 2017-18 school year, students with disabilities served by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act were 13% of enrolled students — but 80% of students that were physically restrained and 77% of students that were secluded. 

Federal data for the same school

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University of Manitoba Faculty Association votes in favour of strike action

Members of the University of Manitoba Faculty Association (UMFA) have voted in favour of hitting the picket line over an ongoing labour dispute with the school’s administration.



a large building: Members of the University of Manitoba Faculty Association has voted in favour of a possible strike.


© University of Manitoba
Members of the University of Manitoba Faculty Association has voted in favour of a possible strike.

In a release Monday, UMFA said 80 per cent of its voting members approved a potential strike action.

The union says 85 per cent of its members took part in the three days of voting, which started Friday.

Read more: University of Manitoba Faculty Association’s bargaining unit to hold strike vote

“It’s time for (U of M) President (Michael) Benarroch to do what is best for the University community and agree to neutral, third party interest arbitration, or return to the bargaining table with a reasonable counter-offer,” said UMFA president Michael Shaw in the release.

Shaw has previously told 680 CJOB discussions between UMFA and the school have been ongoing since August and stem from a deal made after the Manitoba Labour Board ruled the university committed an unfair labour practice during bargaining with the faculty association in the fall of 2016.

Video: Mixed-use development slated for former Southwood Golf and Country Club at University of Manitoba

The association filed a complaint at the height of a three-week strike in November 2016, stating the university had failed to disclose that the new Progressive Conservative government had asked the university to freeze faculty salaries.

While the university and faculty association ultimately ratified a four-year collective agreement, which included no wage increase in the first year, followed by 0.75 per cent and one per cent raises in the second and third years, both sides agreed to renegotiate the agreement’s year-four salary in the fourth year.

Read more: University of Manitoba strike ends after Faculty Association approves new deal

Shaw has said the union has offered to go to binding arbitration with the university, but the administration has so far refused, he said.

When asked for comment Monday, a university spokesperson pointed Global News to a statement posted to the University of Manitoba’s website Friday.

In the statement, the school says its priority is “doing what we can to prevent any further disruption to students’ lives.”

“We cannot speak about the specifics of the bargaining because we are committed to a fair bargaining process, but we want to assure you that our focus remains on reaching an agreement, at the bargaining table,” reads the statement from the school’s president and vice-presidents.

Read more: Tentative agreement reached between University of Manitoba and faculty association

“The impacts of the global pandemic and other factors have altered our current reality and imposed unique constrictions this year.

“The University remains committed ultimately to bringing UMFA salaries more in line with salaries at peer universities.”

Video: University of Manitoba undertaking clinical trials of possible COVID-19 treatment drug

In an open letter to students posted to

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