University student killed by stray bullet on 1st visit to New York City

A 20-year-old Indiana college student was struck and killed by a stray bullet on a trip to New York City, a place he had dreamed of visiting since seeing Spider-Man as a child, his parents said.



a car parked on the side of a building: Scene in Brooklyn, New York where an Indiana University student was killed by a stray bullet while sitting on the stoop, Oct. 24, 2020.


© WABC
Scene in Brooklyn, New York where an Indiana University student was killed by a stray bullet while sitting on the stoop, Oct. 24, 2020.

Ethan Williams, a student at Indiana University in Bloomington, died early Saturday morning when he was hit by the errant bullet while sitting on a stoop of a home he and his traveling companions had rented, police said.

“He has a massive massive heart, he loved people a lot. There’s [an] irony to me that that was the life that was taken. You know, the life of someone that wanted to give his life back to helping people,” his father, Jason Williams, told ABC station WABC-TV in New York.

The shooting unfolded about 2:30 a.m. on Saturday as Ethan Williams was sitting on the front stoop of the Airbnb rental home in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, police said. Witnesses told police they heard at least seven shots and Jason Williams said his son was hit once in the chest.

Ethan Williams was taken to Wyckoff Heights Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.



a car parked on the side of a building: Scene in Brooklyn, New York where an Indiana University student was killed by a stray bullet while sitting on the stoop, Oct. 24, 2020.


© WABC
Scene in Brooklyn, New York where an Indiana University student was killed by a stray bullet while sitting on the stoop, Oct. 24, 2020.

New York Police Department officials said they do not believe Williams was the intended target.

“He was pretty much killed instantly from the stray bullet that went down the street,” Jason Williams said.

Police said Sunday that no one has been arrested in the killing and that investigators are interviewing witnesses and reviewing surveillance video in an effort to identify the person responsible.

“They need to understand that their actions have consequences beyond the moment,” Susan Williams told WABC of the person who killed her son. “Turn yourself in, do what’s right. Let our family have peace.”

MORE: 12-year-old boy inside his Buffalo home killed by stray bullet to the head

Williams was a sophomore at Indiana University and was studying to become a filmmaker, his parents said. They said Ethan Williams was in New York to work on on a short documentary with a film crew.

The Williams said it was their son’s first trip to New York City and that he had worked over the summer and saved up money to pay for the trip.

MORE: Teen killed by stray bullet while asleep in her home, police say

“When Ethan was a little guy, 3 or 4 years old, he saw Spider-Man and he fell in love with New York,” Jason Williams said.

Susan Williams added, “His hope was always to go to graduate school in New York. That was the dream.”

MORE: 1-year-old boy killed in Brooklyn as gun violence continues in cities

The parents said their son graduated from high school with four

Read more

Indiana University student killed by stray bullet on 1st visit to New York City

Ethan Wiliams had wanted to visit New York since seeing Spider-Man as a child.

Ethan Williams, a student at Indiana University in Bloomington, died early Saturday morning when he was hit by the errant bullet while sitting on a stoop of a home he and his traveling companions had rented, police said.

“He has a massive massive heart, he loved people a lot. There’s [an] irony to me that that was the life that was taken. You know, the life of someone that wanted to give his life back to helping people,” his father, Jason Williams, told ABC station WABC-TV in New York.

The shooting unfolded about 2:30 a.m. on Saturday as Ethan Williams was sitting on the front stoop of the Airbnb rental home in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, police said. Witnesses told police they heard at least seven shots and Jason Williams said his son was hit once in the chest.

Ethan Williams was taken to Wyckoff Heights Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

New York Police Department officials said they do not believe Williams was the intended target.

“He was pretty much killed instantly from the stray bullet that went down the street,” Jason Williams said.

Police said Sunday that no one has been arrested in the killing and that investigators are interviewing witnesses and reviewing surveillance video in an effort to identify the person responsible.

“They need to understand that their actions have consequences beyond the moment,” Susan Williams told WABC of the person who killed her son. “Turn yourself in, do what’s right. Let our family have peace.”

Williams was a sophomore at Indiana University and was studying to become a filmmaker, his parents said. They said Ethan Williams was in New York to work on on a short documentary with a film crew.

The Williams said it was their son’s first trip to New York City and that he had worked over the summer and saved up money to pay for the trip.

“When Ethan was a little guy, 3 or 4 years old, he saw Spider-Man and he fell in love with New York,” Jason Williams said.

Susan Williams added, “His hope was always to go to graduate school in New York. That was the dream.”

The parents said their son graduated from high school with four honors diplomas and traveled to Africa to do missionary work.

Indianapolis Mayor

Read more

Look up! The moon will pay Jupiter and Saturn a visit tonight

Skywatchers will be treated to an eye-catching gathering in the south-southwest sky about an hour after sunset on Thursday (Oct. 22) — a large triangle formed by the moon and two bright “superior” planets.  

A superior planet is one that is located in an orbit around the sun that is beyond that of Earth. The planets in question are Jupiter and Saturn, which have attracted the attention of skywatchers all through the summer and early fall.

Of course, these close alignments are merely an illusion of perspective. Our moon is much closer in space to us than is either Jupiter or Saturn. As it orbits Earth, the moon moves in an easterly direction across the sky at roughly its own apparent diameter (0.5 degrees) each hour, or approximately 12 degrees per day. (Your clenched fist held at arm’s length covers about 10 degrees of sky.) 

Currently, Jupiter and Saturn are located in the zodiacal constellation of Sagittarius, positioned above and to the left of the popular “Teapot” asterism. The two planets are now separated by about 6 degrees, but they’ll be getting a lot closer to each other in the days and weeks to come as we get closer to their so-called “Great Conjunction” in late December.

Related: Best night sky events of October 2020 (stargazing maps)

Jupiter and its retinue

Thursday night’s rendezvous between the moon, Jupiter and Saturn will be an eye-catching sight, which probably will attract the attention even of those who don’t normally pay much attention to the night sky. Beginning about an hour after sunset, cast your eyes about a quarter of the way up from the south-southwest horizon. There you will find a wide crescent moon hovering about 4 degrees to the lower left of brilliant Jupiter. 

And if you use a telescope or even steadily held binoculars, you can also catch a view of all four famous Galilean satellites, which were first viewed in 1610 by Galileo Galilei using his crude homemade telescope. One satellite stands by itself on one side of Jupiter. That will be Callisto. Meanwhile, on the opposite side will be the three other Galilean moons: Moving out from Jupiter will be Europa, Io and Ganymede.      

Saturn: ‘Lord of the rings’

The moon will also team up with the ringed wonder of the solar system, Saturn. Just look about 4.5 degrees to the moon’s upper left and you’ll see a bright yellowish-white “star” shining with a steady, sedate glow. That will be Saturn. 

When a telescope or large binoculars with at least 20-power magnification are trained on Saturn, one immediately sees that here is a planet that stands out from the others, thanks to its magnificent system of rings. Like the four big moons of Jupiter, the rings were first seen by Galileo, though because he was using a crude telescope, he could not make out what they actually were. 

As seen through Galileo’s telescope, Saturn seemed to have an oval shape. He at first thought there were two

Read more

Ducey blasts Proposition 208 during visit with Education Secretary Betsy DeVos

Gov. Doug Ducey delivered a scathing rebuke of Proposition 208, the Invest in Education Act, while visiting a school on Thursday with U.S Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

The proposal on November’s ballot would add a 3.5% surcharge on income tax for individuals with taxable income of $250,000 or more or couples making $500,000 or more. The revenue would go largely to raising school staff salaries.

Loading...

Load Error

“It would make us the equivalent of Bernie Sanders’ Vermont, or New York state or Washington, D.C.,” he said in response to a question about U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders’ endorsement of the measure. 

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Sanders, I-Vt., endorsed Proposition 208 in a news release on Thursday morning. 

“Let’s address the decades of cuts to education funding in Arizona and invest in our schools, teachers, and kids,” he wrote in a statement. 

A poll released Thursday showed that the measure is in the lead among registered voters.

These are not Ducey’s first public remarks against Proposition 208. He has long said he opposes any new tax increases.

Ducey on Thursday contended the measure will hurt the state’s economy. Conservative organizations, including the Goldwater Institute, have made similar claims, arguing that small businesses will bear the brunt of the surcharge. 

“It would be the equivalent of hanging a sign over our state that said, ‘Look elsewhere,'” Ducey said. “All the pipeline of people and opportunities that are coming to Arizona would be hurt.” 

Invest in Ed proponents refute that claim. The measure would affect a

Read more