Academy of Art University students hold Christmas tree design competition at Ghirardelli Square

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — San Francisco’s Ghirardelli Square took on a festive air on Friday as it hosted an Academy of Art University Christmas tree design competition.

Fifteen trees were decorated by student finalists from nine different departments of the school.

WATCH: East Bay artists bring warmth, joy to downtown Livermore by decorating trees with sweaters

The finalists were selected for their creative takes on the classic holiday tradition, and then judged on the criteria of department representation, selection and application of materials, and overall design.

The winner of the competition, announced today, came from the Photography Department.

The finalists’ trees will be on display in Ghirardelli Square until Dec. 31 as part of a special Christmas Tree Stroll through the square exhibit.

RELATED: Here’s how to keep your Christmas tree alive through December

The installation, paired with the nightly lighting of the square, allows visitors to celebrate the season safely.

Each tree places QR codes and placards to offer a self-guided tour experience.

Go here for the latest videos and stories about the holidays.

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University of Tulsa helping lead project to build up nation’s cybersecurity workforce | Local News

“The project also dovetails nicely with the (George Kaiser Family Foundation) initiative to make Tulsa a cyber city,” Shenoi said.

The project was initiated based on a report from the U.S. Department of Commerce and DHS that describes both cybersecurity workforce needs and projected shortages.

In 2017, there were almost 300,000 active openings for cybersecurity-related jobs in the U.S. Globally, projections suggest a cybersecurity workforce shortage of 1.8 million by 2022, officials said.

Moreover, the majority of U.S. critical infrastructure is owned and operated by private companies, making its cybersecurity workforce vital.

The federal government also depends heavily on its cybersecurity workforce, supplemented by contractors.

Shenoi said the goal is to build up the nation’s cyber workforce in two areas, incident response and industrial control systems.

“Everything is automated now. And as you can imagine, really bad things can happen,” he said. “You can hack a plane while it’s flying. Or you can affect a nuclear reactor or a gas pipeline or an automobile.”

We’ve become a world of “small intelligent devices,” Shenoi said.

“They are all over the place, communicate with each other and make our lives better — but we’ve got to secure them.”

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Shanghai Normal University Establishes Digital Humanities Research Center to Promote Chinese DH Research and Education

Press release content from Marketers MEDIA. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

On November 23, 2020, the International Summit Forum on Digital Humanities and the Opening Ceremony of …

On November 23, 2020, the International Summit Forum on Digital Humanities and the Opening Ceremony of Digital Humanities Research Center of Shanghai Normal University (SHNUDH) was held in Xuhui campus of Shanghai Normal University. Dozens of experts and scholars from Harvard, UCL, Academia Sinica, PKU and other well-known universities, research and cultural institutions were invited to attend the meeting.

After a brief and warm opening ceremony, the scholars conducted in-depth exchanges on giving full play to the advantages of Humanities in the digital age, responding to the major concerns of the times and society, and enabling the humanities and social sciences to combine the latest progress in the frontier fields of digital technology, methods and artificial intelligence, and realizing the deep integration and collaborative innovation of science and technology and humanities and social sciences. Scholars also discussed on their research theories and methods, history and current situation, development direction of DH and development mode of DH projects.

Chen Heng, vice president of Shanghai Normal University, pointed out in his speech that the university has a strong accumulation in DH Research. After the establishment of the Digital Humanities Research Center, it will continue to promote the construction of multi-cultural and historical thematic databases, to conduct the “SHNUDH Platform” and DH-Lab, to develop DH research tools, to support publications of relevant research, to advance global academic exchanges and cooperation, and to build a DH teaching system.

Prof. Zha Qinghua, director of SHNUDH, said that DH is a frontier field in the international academia, and is also a burgeoning interdiscipline. It aims to introduce the humanities academic research with digital and technical methods, and to promote its academic innovation. SHNU has always been an important place in the study of humanities in China. The establishment of the center will surely promote the advantages of Chinese Humanities and make it an important and dynamic field at home and abroad.

Author: Zhao Wenwen
Contact: Wang He, vice director of SHNUDH, associate professor of Chinese Literature at SHNU.
Email: [email protected]
Follow SHNUDH Official Accounts: http://ll028.cn/w2aMQU

Contact Info:
Name: Wang He
Email: Send Email
Organization: SHNUDH
Website: https://www.shine.cn/news/metro/2011230416/

Release ID: 88985859

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New Mexico university to offer industrial hemp certificate

LAS VEGAS, N.M. (AP) — Regents at New Mexico Highlands University have approved a new program that will offer students a certificate in industrial hemp entrepreneurship.

Approval came earlier this month, but school officials say the program must still go through any required state and accreditor reviews. The Higher Learning Commission must also sign off.

Industrial hemp production was legalized in New Mexico in 2019, and federal officials just recently approved the state Department of Agriculture’s hemp production regulatory plan. That allows the state to continue regulatory oversight over hemp production within its borders.

Growers and state officials say New Mexico has advantages over other states due to optimal growing conditions and an abundance of relatively cheap land.

“We believe that industrial hemp is a growth industry that can benefit the economic development of northeastern New Mexico,” Highlands business professor Heath Anderson said. “The most important goal of the new certificate program is to prepare students with the professional skills needed to be successful in the burgeoning legal hemp industry. It’s an opportunity to create an offering that’s very relevant in the business market.”

The university’s program will have two tracks — one for students focused on the business of industrial hemp and another for students interested in the science of plant production.

Industrialized hemp can be used in many products, from textiles and bioplastics to biofuels and medicinal applications.

The New Mexico Economic Development Department has predicted some 400 jobs could result from hemp-related businesses throughout the state with help from local economic development funding.

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Division II-member Queens University (NC) beats Howard 85-71

WASHINGTON — Kenny Dye had 16 points and seven assists as Division II-member Queens University (N.C.) defeated Howard 85-71 on Friday in the Paradise Jam.

Queens replaced Northeastern in the tournament and lost to George Mason 66-65 on Thursday. The Royals are scheduled to face Belmont on Saturday.

Gavin Rains had 14 points and seven rebounds for Queens. Justin Thomas added 11 points and Kelyn Pennie had 10. The Royals scored 25 points off 18 Howard turnovers and shot 51.6% from the floor.

Makur Maker had 12 points for the Bison (0-2). Steve Settle III added 12 points and seven rebounds, and Sam Green had 12 points and nine rebounds.

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Ziegler Advises Carefirst Bluecross Blueshield On Its Acquisition Of University Of Maryland Health Partners & University Of Maryland Health Advantage

CHICAGO, Nov. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Ziegler, a specialty investment bank, is pleased to announce its role in advising CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield (CareFirst) in the acquisition of University of Maryland Health Partners (UMHP) and University of Maryland Health Advantage (UMHA) from The University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS). UMMS is a university-based regional care health system focused on serving the health care needs of Maryland residents, bringing innovation, discovery, and research to the healthcare system and educating the state’s future physician and health care professionals through its partnership with the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the UM Schools of Nursing, Pharmacy, Social Work and Dentistry in Baltimore. As one of the largest private employers in the State, the health system’s 28,000 employees and 4,000 affiliated physicians provide primary and specialty care in more than 150 locations at 13 hospitals. UMHP is a 47,000 member Managed Medicaid plan, operating in 21 of 24 Maryland counties through a network of 38 hospitals, 14 FQHCs and over 10,000 physicians. UMHA is a 6,000 member Dual Special Needs (DSNP) Medicare Advantage plan which operates in 15 of 24 Maryland counties with a similar network to UMHP. UMMS acquired UMHP and UMHA in a 2015 transaction with Riverside Health, Inc. in order to align its operations vertically into the payor space.

In its 83rd year of service, CareFirst, an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, is a not-for-profit health care company which, through its affiliates and subsidiaries, offers a comprehensive portfolio of health insurance products to 3.4 million individuals and groups in Maryland, the District of Columbia and Northern Virginia. In 2018, CareFirst invested $43 million to improve overall health, and increase the accessibility, affordability, safety and quality of health care throughout its market areas.

“The University of Maryland Medical System and CareFirst have always been strong allies and the acquisition of UMHP and UMHA further solidifies that alignment,” said Mohan Suntha, MD, MBA, President and CEO of UMMS. “More importantly, it ensures our Medicaid and Medicare enrollees have uninterrupted access to comprehensive health coverage and care through partnership with a Maryland-based, not-for-profit health plan. Delivering high quality, compassionate care is fundamental to the missions both UMMS and CareFirst serve and we are confident that UMHP and UMHA enrollees will benefit from CareFirst’s expertise in the market.”

“This partnership brings the best capabilities of CareFirst and UMMS together in a new model and is part of our broader efforts designed to deliver care focused on value and improved health outcomes. Our work with the UMMS team will provide opportunities for deeper collaboration and innovation designed to bring our shared communities greater value, expanded access to high quality care, better consumer experiences, and more equitable care for all Maryland residents,” said CareFirst President & CEO Brian D. Pieninck.

Chris Hendrickson, Managing Director, in Ziegler’s Healthcare Corporate Finance practice, stated, “CareFirst has built an outstanding reputation as the largest health insurer in the

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Anti-vaxxers exploit confusion over Oxford University data



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Anti-vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety.

Experts fear substantial numbers will refuse the vaccine.

One study predicted only around half of British adults will agree to be vaccinated, severely hitting the ability of the programme to generate herd immunity.

These fears have grown as anti-vaccination campaigners have jumped on criticism of the way the preliminary data from Oxford’s trials has been handled.

The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that protection to 90 per cent.



a group of people standing in front of water: An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London


© Provided by Daily Mail
An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London

However, officials in the US later claimed the lower dose was given to people only under 55, casting doubts over its ability to protect those who need it most. American analysts have even claimed the vaccine would never be licensed in the US.

British scientists have been less critical, noting that full publication of the data is expected in the Lancet medical journal soon.

The Government has asked the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to assess Oxford’s data, with a view to a rollout early next month.

Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at Oxford and the Government’s life sciences adviser, dismissed the criticism, saying: ‘We weren’t cooking this up as we went along.’ But so-called ‘anti-vaxxers’ have leapt on the confusion to spread fear online.

US campaigner Del Bigtree, producer of the notorious film Vaxxed, described it as a ‘trial disaster’ and sceptics on social media have cast doubts on the vaccine’s safety.

Professor Eleanor Riley, of the University of Edinburgh, said the matter needs to be cleared up rapidly to ensure trust is not lost.

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Anti-vaxxers exploit confusion over Oxford University data to cast doubts on jab’s safety


By Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent For The Daily Mail

02:22 28 Nov 2020, updated 02:22 28 Nov 2020

Anti-vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety.

Experts fear substantial numbers will refuse the vaccine.

One study predicted only around half of British adults will agree to be vaccinated, severely hitting the ability of the programme to generate herd immunity.

These fears have grown as anti-vaccination campaigners have jumped on criticism of the way the preliminary data from Oxford’s trials has been handled.

The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that protection to 90 per cent.

An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London

However, officials in the US later claimed the lower dose was given to people only under 55, casting doubts over its ability to protect those who need it most. American analysts have even claimed the vaccine would never be licensed in the US.

British scientists have been less critical, noting that full publication of the data is expected in the Lancet medical journal soon.

The Government has asked the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to assess Oxford’s data, with a view to a rollout early next month.

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Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at Oxford and the Government’s life sciences adviser, dismissed the criticism, saying: ‘We weren’t cooking this up as we went along.’ But so-called ‘anti-vaxxers’ have leapt on the confusion to spread fear online.

US campaigner Del Bigtree, producer of the notorious film Vaxxed, described it as a ‘trial disaster’ and sceptics on social media have cast doubts on the vaccine’s safety.

Professor Eleanor Riley, of the University of Edinburgh, said the matter needs to be cleared up rapidly to ensure trust is not lost.

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Middletown Native, Quinnipiac University Student Showcases Work

MIDDLETOWN, NJ — A Middletown native and Quinnipiac University student recently was a recent presenter at the annual Sigma Xi Scientific Research Honor Society’s virtual conference, the school announce this week.

Megan Haddad, who is studying international business at Quinnipiac, made the presentation, “An Effective Criminal Justice System: The Roles of National Culture, Gender Inequality, and Access to Information and Communication,” at the conference, which was held earlier this month. Haddad’s work explored the potential impacts of national cultural value dimensions, gender inequality, and access to information and communication on the level of an effective criminal justice system, the school announced.

“These undergraduate students have demonstrated an excellent level of research ability together with the hard work and persistence necessary to have their research accepted for presentation at a well-known international scientific conference,” Robert Engle, professor of international business said of the presentation. “The School of Business is proud of their accomplishments.”

Sigma Xi, which is based in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park, is the world’s largest multidisciplinary honor society for scientists and engineers. Its mission is to enhance the health of the research enterprise, foster integrity in science and engineering, and promote the public understanding of science for the purpose of improving the human condition.

Sigma Xi chapters can be found at colleges and universities, government laboratories and industry research centers around the world. More than 200 Nobel Prize winners have been members.

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University admissions tests like the SAT are under scrutiny especially in the age of COVID-19

Many Grade 12 high school students are now looking ahead to post-secondary studies next fall. Those wishing to attend universities in the United States will see that the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the growing shift to test-optional university admissions policies — or scrapping entrance tests altogether.

Due to COVID-19, many U.S. universities, including Yale, Cornell, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania have announced they won’t require applicants for fall 2021 to write either the SAT or ACT.

But even before the pandemic, entrance examinations were under scrutiny. The University of California voted in May to phase out both the SAT and the ACT as requirements for university admissions, largely due to concerns over racial and cultural bias. Other universities have made similar pronouncements.

Many people are wondering if the COVID-19 pandemic will spell the end of university admission testing altogether, and what the implications are for Canadian universities and the approximately 25,000 Canadian students that attend post-secondary institutions in the United States each year.

History of admissions testing

In England, some universities first adopted examinations as the basis for admission in the 1800s. It was not long until university admission testing spread to other parts of the world. A large number of countries now use some form of testing for admission to undergraduate education.

In the United Kingdom, A-level exams across subjects are administered by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulations. In New Zealand, the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) uses internal and external assessments to determine students’ achievement of standards, and subsequent admission to post-secondary education and employment.

In Canada, several provinces including Alberta and British Columbia have used senior level subject exams as indicators for university entrance, and often in conjunction with teacher grades. In Australia, universities may ask some applicants to write the STAT, a scholastic aptitude test. However, many people are beginning to question the appropriateness of testing for equitable admissions decisions, particularly now in the COVID-19 era.

Students writing an exam.
Many people are beginning to question the appropriateness of testing for equitable admissions decisions, particularly now in the COVID-19 era.
(Shutterstock)

A common metric?

Advocates of admissions testing say there is a need to compare students using a common metric. Their chief rationale for using a common benchmark to make admittance decisions is wanting reliable and valid assessments, rather than depending on the idiosyncratic nature of classroom teachers’ assessment practices.

Supporters of admissions testing argue that these external examinations provide an objective metric that may help disadvantaged pupils.

Well before the pandemic, some argued that admissions testing at some of Canada’s universities would help ensure students have the necessary abilities for post-secondary success in their targeted programs.

Digital companies are beginning to take a vested interested in testing — particularly in light of COVID-19, which has forced several assessments into remote proctored environments. Some companies have advanced new technologies that enable responsive test questions, secure online test distribution and administration. Some are currently integrating virtual and alternative digital realities to create more authentic testing environments.

What

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