Learn From Failure, Not Just From Success

By Johnny Wood

When it comes to offering lessons on navigating a fulfilling career in engineering, Mario Gaia has no shortage of rich material to draw on. He’s worked for more than a half century in energy, as an engineer, innovator, entrepreneur and businessman.

Gaia, the founder and honorary chairman of MHI Group company Turboden, started out on the research team of Professor Gianfranco Angelino at Politecnico di Milano, investigating Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) thermodynamics and design. ORC systems generate electric and thermal power from multiple sources, including renewables, traditional fuels and waste heat from industrial processes, waste incinerators, engines or gas turbines, making them an important and versatile technology in decarbonization.

Enthusiastic about the impact the technology could have, Gaia went on to found Turboden in 1980, which became part of MHI Group in 2013. As his company turns 40 this year, Gaia reflects here on success, failure and moments of inspiration – each of which he considers vital to continual growth and creativity.

In addressing engineers who are just starting out, what would you say are the most important skills and qualities for having a successful career? How about for building a successful engineering company?

Companies grow through fostering creativity and innovation, attributes which help good engineers succeed and are at the heart of Turboden’s continued development. In the field of engineering, technical excellence provides the bedrock which allows creative, enterprising people to flourish.

Whether a new recruit or an old hand, engineers need to feel part of a team where all colleagues, junior and senior, are valued and share common goals. This sounds simple, but it involves everybody working to build a company culture that creates opportunities to suggest solutions, be creative and get involved.

Which do you consider the better teacher, success or failure?

It’s easier to learn from success than failure. The latter is more painful, but both are valid. Success is encouraging. It stimulates analysis and knowledge, which often supports new thinking and novel ways of doing things.

“[Failure] requires you to take full responsibility for mistakes and be honest with yourself about them, and that’s not easy.”

On the other hand, failure generates fear and makes you question the validity of what you are doing. It requires you to take full responsibility for mistakes and be honest with yourself about them, and that’s not easy. When someone fails, it can be both a tough lesson and a good teacher, provided you are prepared to learn from the experience.

What prompted you to start a company based on a new way of generating energy?

Throughout my career I have followed my instincts and let curiosity be the mother of invention. 

As a young student, I wondered what the effect would be of using a different fluid in steam engines. Many years later, after joining

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Elon Musk says SpaceX’s new Starship rocket has 33% chance of success

  • SpaceX is planning to fly a Starship rocket prototype to its highest altitude yet this weekend, according to road closures and a Notice to Airmen issued for the aerospace company’s launch site in southern Texas. 
  • The spacecraft should fly 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) into the air. Previous prototypes have only made short hops of about 150 meters (492 feet).
  • SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said there was a lot that could go wrong, and gave the rocket a one-in-three chance of landing in one piece.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

This weekend, Elon Musk’s space-exploration company, SpaceX, is poised to take a big step forward in its quest to further revolutionize space travel.

Musk tweeted on Sunday that a prototype of SpaceX’s enormous Starship spacecraft — a fully reusable vehicle the company wants to use to send humans to the moon and Mars — will soon undergo its first high-altitude test.

The flight attempt to 15 kilometers (9.3 miles), follows a successful November 24 rocket-engine test firing of the Starship prototype, called SN8 or serial no. 8. The test also comes after a successful “hop” flight in August to roughly 150 meters (492 feet) using a previous prototype called SN5.

On Wednesday the Federal Aviation Administration issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) for a rocket launch from the Boca Chica Village in southern Texas, where SpaceX is developing Starship, from Friday at 8 a.m. CT through Sunday at 5 p.m. CT.

However, both a NOTAM and road closures are required for launch. The Cameron County judge has issued Boca Chica road-closure notices for every weekday through December 9, but the only overlap with the NOTAM is Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT.

Musk: ‘Maybe 1/3 chance’ of a successful flight and landing

SpaceX Starship.JPG

A prototype of SpaceX’s Starship spacecraft at the company’s facility in Boca Chica, Texas (September 28, 2019).

REUTERS/Callaghan O’Hare


This test flight will be a big step in testing whether the design can withstand the rigors of flights to higher altitudes.

Musk said in a follow-up tweet on Wednesday that a “lot of things need to go right” for SN8 to land intact, adding that he thinks there’s “maybe 1/3 chance” that it does.

However, should SN8 fail, SpaceX’s Starship factory is cranking out more prototypes, and SN9 could soon be ready to take its place for future testing.

Read more: SpaceX may spend billions to outsource Starlink satellite-dish production, an industry insider says — and could lose $2,000 on each one it sells

SpaceX’s Starship spacecraft is made up of two sections, the Super Heavy booster and the Starship rocket ship, which Musk claims will be able to carry 100 people to Mars at a time. The entire spacecraft stands at 120 metres (394 feet) tall. 

In October, Musk said SpaceX has a “fighting chance” of sending an uncrewed Starship rocket to Mars in 2024, two years later than previously hoped. 

Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX’s president and chief operating officer said October 23 the Starship

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Tom Penders’ traveling success story began at UConn, ends at College Basketball’s Hall of Fame

When Tom Penders got the news last January, he had to keep it to himself. Thanks to the pandemic, he had to keep the secret far longer than intended, for nearly a year, and from a whole lot of people.



Tom Penders wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: Tom Penders played at UConn from 1964-67, back in the days when assist stats were not kept by the school.


© Courtesy University of Houston/Hartford Courant/TNS
Tom Penders played at UConn from 1964-67, back in the days when assist stats were not kept by the school.

But now the world can know: The former UConn guard who coached at seven schools is going into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame.

“I took a rather circuitous route,” says Penders, who at 75 still enjoys a good laugh, a bit of irony and as many basketball games as he can watch, record, fit into his day. “Normally, these honors are for guys like Jim [Calhoun], who can take a school to heights it had never been before and stay there.”

Penders will join Calhoun, who was among this Hall’s founding class in 2006, and he will be the first UConn grad to go in. The classes of 2020, including Penders, and 2021 were announced Sunday and will be inducted in Kansas City next November.

“I didn’t have one family,” Penders says. “I had seven families. Plus two high school teams. The first thing that goes through your mind, at least through mine, is the very start of your career at age 23, being named the coach at Bullard Havens in Bridgeport. One of my tri-captains, Charlie Bentley, became one of the greatest coaches in Connecticut high school basketball, at Harding High, and so I had to tell him.”

At one stop after another, entertaining, winning basketball arrived with Tom Penders. Though he had his battles and sometimes departed amid controversy, there would always be another school that wanted him. In Broadway terms, he was Professor Harold Hill, except he really could lead a band.

Bullard Havens Tech in 1968 is the time and place where Penders first pulled off his signature trick: the quick turnaround. With 16 of 20 games on the road, Bullard Havens was 14-6. The next season, at Bridgeport Central, Penders was 23-2. At his first college job, Tufts in 1971-72, he finished 12-8, and 54-18 in three seasons.

It took Penders three years to turn Columbia and Fordham, which he led to five NITs, into winning programs, but when he got to Rhode Island, taking over on the eve of the 1986-87 season, Penders went 20-10 in Year 1. After leading the Rams to the Sweet 16 in 1988, he moved on to Texas, taking his up-tempo style and love of the 3-pointer with him.

“I was making $50,000 at Rhode Island,” Penders says, “and then Texas put another zero on my contract.”

First year at Texas? 25-9. At George Washington in 1998? 20-9. His last coaching job at Houston? 18-14. In his first seasons, Penders won 56.8 percent of his games with players he inherited.

“A lot of coaches make the mistake of going in and

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Conscientiousness key to team success during space missions

Conscientiousness key to team success during space missions
Analog astronauts Joao Lousada and Stefan Dobrovolny before sunset. Credit: ÖWF/Florian Voggeneder

NASA is working toward sending humans to Mars by 2030. If all goes according to plan, the flight crew’s return trip to the red planet will take about two-and-half years. That’s a long time to spend uninterrupted with co-workers. But imagine if the astronauts don’t get along with each other.


To ensure that doesn’t happen, a new study led by Western University tested team dynamics of five astronauts during an analog Mars mission staged by the Austrian Space Forum in 2018 in Oman, a country that shares borders with Yemen, United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.

The study found that conscientiousness is a key requirement for a crew to achieve its extraterrestrial tasks, outdistancing other potential traits like honesty, humility, emotionality, extraversion, openness and agreeableness.

“Conscientiousness, an individual personality trait, can be thought of as a pooled team resource,” said Julia McMenamin, a Western psychology Ph.D. candidate and first author of the paper published by Astrobiology. “The more conscientiousness a team is, the better they will likely be at accomplishing tasks.”

On the other end of scale, counterproductive behaviors like social loafing—the tendency for people to exert less effort when working as part of a team than they do when working alone—will likely mean a no-go for launch for potential astronauts heading to Mars.

Counterproductive or negative behaviors that commonly cause trouble in teams should be non-negotiables for long duration spaceflight, and great efforts must be made to reduce their likelihood, says McMenamin.

Credit: University of Western Ontario

Strategies to reduce counterproductive behaviors include careful selection of crew members, detailed planning and work processes, and an emphasis on effective communication between team members—factors that should be incorporated into all teamwork experiences.

McMenamin and Western psychology professor Natalie Allen teamed up with Mission Control Space Services chief science officer and Western alumna Melissa Battler on the study. Mission Control is an Ottawa-based space exploration and robotics company.

Before, during and after the four-week AMADEE-18 analog space mission, which simulated a Mars environment featuring isolated and extreme conditions, the analog astronauts completed surveys assessing team conflict, team performance and stress levels. The final survey asked the analog astronauts to rate each of their teammates and themselves on citizenship behavior, in-role behavior, counterproductive work behavior and social loafing.

“Anyone who has worked on a team knows conflict amongst team members can harm team performance and make for a negative experience. When people argue about how to get things done, or get into personal disagreements, there is less time and energy left for completing tasks,” said McMenamin.

“What’s interesting is that there are different types of conflict, and so long as interpersonal issues and arguments about how to go about accomplishing tasks are avoided, differences in views and opinions might actually improve team performance, likely because this allows for the team to benefit from each member’s knowledge and perspective.”

Beyond conflict, acute stress can also impact teams negatively on Earth and

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Netflix Doubles U.K. Production Budget to $1 Billion, After ‘The Crown,’ ‘Sex Education’ Global Success



a woman wearing a dress


© Courtesy of Netflix


Click here to read the full article.

Streaming giant Netflix has doubled its U.K. production budget to $1 billion, following the global success of shows including “The Crown” and “Sex Education.”

Netflix is spending this budget on producing more than 50 shows in the U.K., despite a fraught year that has seen production on “The Witcher” shut down twice due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“The U.K. is an incredibly important market to Netflix and we’re proud to be increasing our investment in the U.K.’s creative industries,” said a Netflix spokesperson. “‘The Crown,’ ‘Sex Education’ and ‘The Witcher’ are among the shows that have been made in the U.K. this year and will be watched by the world. And these shows are a testament to the depth of talent that exists here.”

“We will continue to invest in the best content in every genre, and are fully committed to supporting British production and creative talent for many years to come,” the spokesperson added.

The Netflix U.K. production budget is second only to its U.S. spend, and is the largest of all its hubs in Europe. The streamer is investing heavily in studio space to house its productions. Last year, Netflix set up a huge production hub at Shepperton Studios outside London. Of course, given Disney has a similar deal at Pinewood Studios, studio space is at a premium around London, and could lead to a strain on facilities.

Meanwhile, Netflix shows continue to remain in the public eye. The fourth season of “The Crown” has received flak from the family members of those portrayed in the show.

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China calls launch a success as robotic spacecraft heads to moon

WENCHANG, China (Reuters) – China hailed as a success its pre-dawn launch on Tuesday of a robotic spacecraft to bring back rocks from the moon in the first bid by any country to retrieve lunar surface samples since the 1970s, a mission underscoring Chinese ambitions in space.

The Long March-5 Y5 rocket, carrying the Chang’e-5 lunar probe, takes off from Wenchang Space Launch Center, in Wenchang, Hainan province, China November 24, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang

The Long March-5, China’s largest carrier rocket, blasted off at 4:30 a.m. Beijing time (2030 GMT on Monday) in a launch from Wenchang Space Launch Center on the southern Chinese island of Hainan carrying the Chang’e-5 spacecraft.

The China National Space Administration (CNSA) called the launch a success and said in a statement that the rocket flew for nearly 37 minutes before sending the spacecraft on its intended trajectory.

The Chang’e-5 mission, named after the ancient Chinese goddess of the moon, will seek to collect lunar material to help scientists understand more about the moon’s origins and formation. The mission will test China’s ability to remotely acquire samples from space, ahead of more complex missions.

State broadcaster CCTV, which ran live coverage of the launch, showed images of CNSA staff in blue uniforms applauding and cheering as they watched the spacecraft climbing through the atmosphere, lighting up the night sky.

If the mission is completed as planned, it would make China only the third country to have retrieved lunar samples, joining the United States and the Soviet Union.

Upon entering the moon’s orbit, the spacecraft is intended to deploy a pair of vehicles to the lunar surface: a lander and an ascender. The landing is due to take place in about eight days, according to Pei Zhaoyu, a spokesman for the mission. The probe is due to be on the lunar surface for about two days, while the entire mission is scheduled to take around 23 days.

The plan is for the lander to drill into the lunar surface, with a robotic arm scooping out soil and rocks. This material would be transferred to the ascender vehicle, which is due to carry it from the surface and then dock with an orbiting module.

The samples then would be transferred to a return capsule for the return trip to Earth, with a landing in China’s Inner Mongolia region.

“The biggest challenges … are the sampling work on the lunar surface, take-off from the lunar surface, rendezvous and docking in the lunar orbit, as well as high-speed re-entry to Earth,” said Pei, also director of the space administration’s Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center.

“We can conduct sampling through circumlunar and moon- landing exploration, but it is more intuitive to obtain samples to conduct scientific research – the method is more direct,” Pei added. “Plus, there will be more instruments and more methods to study them on Earth.”

SPACE STATION PLANS

China, which last year carried out the first landing on the far side of the moon and

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Dosing ERROR at AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine trial led to huge boost in jab’s success rate

  • AstraZeneca scientist Mene Pangalos says ‘serendipity,’ led to a break through 
  • ‘Mistake’ helped scientists discover half-dose was more effective than a full one 
  • More analysis needed to explain why an initial lower dose was more effective

A dosing error by researchers on the AstraZeneca-Oxford University vaccine trial led to a huge boost in the jab’s success rate, the firm’s vice president has revealed.

Mene Pangalos, head of AstraZeneca’s non-oncology research and development, said: ‘The reason we had the half dose is serendipity.’

Volunteers in Britain were expected to receive two full doses of the vaccine as it was trialed in the hope of funding a cure.

Dr Pangalos says researches were perplexed when they noticed volunteers were reporting much milder side effects, such as fatigue, headaches and arm aches, than were originally predicted.  

He said: ‘So we went back and checked … and we found out that they had underpredicted the dose of the vaccine by half.’

Dr Mene Pangalos, from AstraZeneca, revealed a ‘mistake,’ led to one volunteer group receiving half of their first dose – but scientists later discovered that dosage was more effective than a full one

He said the team nonetheless decided to press ahead with that half dose group, and to administer the second, full dose booster shot at the scheduled time.

The results showed the vaccine was 90 per cent effective among this group, while a larger group who had received two full doses produced an efficacy read-out of 62%, leading to an overall efficacy of 70% across both dosing patterns, Pangalos said.

‘That, in essence, is how we stumbled upon doing half dose-full dose (group),’ he told Reuters. 

‘Yes, it was a mistake.’

Click here to resize this module

The vaccine uses a harmless adenovirus to deliver genetic material that tricks the human body to produce proteins known as antigens that are normally found on the coronavirus surface, helping the immune system develop an arsenal against infection.

Pangalos said more analysis was needed to explain why an initial lower dose bolstered protection. 

One possible explanation was that lower antigen levels to begin with triggered an overall better immune system build-up, he added.  

Oxford University confirmed its cheap, easy to store and simple to deliver jab could be approved by regulators in as little as a fortnight and start to be administered next month. 

Britain has ordered 100million doses of the Oxford Universty vaccine, with almost 20million due by Christmas

Britain has ordered 100million doses, with almost 20million due by Christmas.

Andrew Pollard, head of the Oxford Vaccine Group and a professor who has spent two decades running clinical trials, said that while speed of the COVID-19 vaccine’s development was in some ways extraordinary, 2020 had ‘been a very long year’ since the team started work on the vaccine in January.

That culminated this past weekend, Pollard said, in having ‘an enormous mountain to climb to pull all of the information together’ to be able to issue Monday’s data release showing the vaccine can

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China Calls Launch a Success as Robotic Spacecraft Heads to Moon | World News

WENCHANG, China (Reuters) – China hailed as a success its pre-dawn launch on Tuesday of a robotic spacecraft to bring back rocks from the moon in the first bid by any country to retrieve lunar surface samples since the 1970s, a mission underscoring Chinese ambitions in space.

The Long March-5, China’s largest carrier rocket, blasted off at 4:30 a.m. Beijing time (2030 GMT on Monday) in a launch from Wenchang Space Launch Center on the southern Chinese island of Hainan carrying the Chang’e-5 spacecraft.

The China National Space Administration (CNSA) called the launch a success and said in a statement that the rocket flew for nearly 37 minutes before sending the spacecraft on its intended trajectory.

The Chang’e-5 mission, named after the ancient Chinese goddess of the moon, will seek to collect lunar material to help scientists understand more about the moon’s origins and formation. The mission will test China’s ability to remotely acquire samples from space, ahead of more complex missions.

State broadcaster CCTV, which ran live coverage of the launch, showed images of CNSA staff in blue uniforms applauding and cheering as they watched the spacecraft climbing through the atmosphere, lighting up the night sky.

If the mission is completed as planned, it would make China only the third country to have retrieved lunar samples, joining the United States and the Soviet Union.

Upon entering the moon’s orbit, the spacecraft is intended to deploy a pair of vehicles to the lunar surface: a lander and an ascender. The landing is due to take place in about eight days, according to Pei Zhaoyu, a spokesman for the mission. The probe is due to be on the lunar surface for about two days, while the entire mission is scheduled to take around 23 days.

The plan is for the lander to drill into the lunar surface, with a robotic arm scooping out soil and rocks. This material would be transferred to the ascender vehicle, which is due to carry it from the surface and then dock with an orbiting module.

The samples then would be transferred to a return capsule for the return trip to Earth, with a landing in China’s Inner Mongolia region.

“The biggest challenges … are the sampling work on the lunar surface, take-off from the lunar surface, rendezvous and docking in the lunar orbit, as well as high-speed re-entry to Earth,” said Pei, also director of the space administration’s Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center.

“We can conduct sampling through circumlunar and moon- landing exploration, but it is more intuitive to obtain samples to conduct scientific research – the method is more direct,” Pei added. “Plus, there will be more instruments and more methods to study them on Earth.”

China, which last year carried out the first landing on the far side of the moon and in July of this year launched a robotic probe to Mars, has other space goals in its sights. It aims to have a permanent manned space station in service around

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How to plan 2020s career success: High-paying jobs in growth industries

  • Business Insider recently found 30 high-paying jobs that were poised for strong growth based on employment projections for between 2019 and 2029 and median wages in 2019.
  • The occupations at the top of our list fall into five main industries, all of which require different education, certifications, and skills.
  • The following is a look at the various paths to getting into these industries, according to career experts, an economist, and career sites.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Bianca Banuelos, who comes from a family of nurses, studied to become a certified nursing assistant while applying to nursing school at Ventura Training Institute, a vocational school in Southern California created by the registered nurse Jannet Wharton.

She was also doing research in endocrinology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles but wanted to work more with patients, so she decided to become a certified nursing assistant.

Though Banuelos initially wanted to try a job outside nursing but still within healthcare, she ultimately decided to follow in her family’s footsteps. It just so happens that this occupation is one that is expected to grow faster than most jobs in the US over the next decade.

Though the pandemic is affecting employment across all industries, some industries are expected to grow over the next decade based on pre-pandemic data. If you are thinking about which kind of career you want, you may want to look at the education background and the skills you will need to succeed in industries with high-paying, high-growth occupations.

We recently ranked the top 30 jobs of the future, based on Labor Department projections for how they’re set to grow over the next decade and how well they pay. You can check out the full ranking here, and in this article, we look at why these jobs are poised for strong growth and how to break into them.

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projections, the top 30 jobs on our ranking are set to collectively add as many as 2.3 million jobs between 2019 and 2029.

These are the jobs of the future — and how to get them.

You can keep scrolling to read the full list or click on one of the links below for a specific industry. If you’re interested in our methodology, look at the final section.

coronavirus nurses

Nurses administer care to a patient in the acute-care COVID-19 unit at Harborview Medical Center on May 7 in Seattle.


Karen Ducey/Getty Images



Healthcare roles are expected to see the most growth among occupational groups covered by BLS over the next decade.

The agency examined projections of the percent change between 2019 and 2029 in the number of people employed. It found six of the 10 fastest-growing jobs were in healthcare, including nurse practitioners and home health aides. Overall, this industry is expected to grow by about 15%, adding 2.4 million jobs.

The following chart replicated from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the percent change in the 10 fastest-growing jobs:

The Indeed Hiring

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Bay High School selected as College Success Award winner: West Shore Chatter

BAY VILLAGE, Ohio — Congratulations to Bay High School, which recently was recognized as a 2020 College Success Award winner by GreatSchools.org. The award honors public high schools doing an extraordinary job preparing students for college and beyond.

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BHS was one of only 2,158 public high schools across the country to be recognized.

This is the third year for the College Success Award. College Success Award-winning high schools are identified based on school-level college preparation and post-secondary data which are collected and shared by their states. The data indicates whether students are prepared for college, enroll in college, are ready for college-level coursework when they get there and/or continue on to their second year. GreatSchools.org is a nonprofit website that reaches more than 46 million users every year. It is supported by charitable foundations that support educational causes that seek to shine a spotlight on education excellence across the country. Remembering those who served: Veterans Day will be observed on Nov. 11, recalling the sacrifices made by the men and women who have served the United States as members of the military.

Unlike Memorial Day, which honors those who made the supreme sacrifice by giving their lives in the service of their country, Veterans Day honors all who served – living and dead. The observance began as Armistice Day, which marked the end of World War I at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month: Nov. 11, 1918. In 1954, it was renamed Veterans Day.

Many cities, including Bay Village, Rocky River and Westlake have memorials or plaques dedicated to their veterans. During non-pandemic times, many communities also celebrate those who served with patriotic ceremonies.

In Bay Village, the Veterans Honor Wall is located in the Dwyer Memorial Senior Center, which unfortunately remains closed because of the coronavirus. The usual veterans’ luncheon will not take place this year, either.

But we still can take a minute to thank all veterans for their service.

Connecting for Kids: With the pandemic continuing, Connecting for Kids’ November programs will be offered on the Zoom virtual platform. Registration is required and can be completed online at connectingforkids.org/register; by email at [email protected]; or by calling/texting 440-570-5908; para español, 440-907-9130.

The Early Childhood Education Series: Using Social Stories to Teach Behavioral Skills will be offered at 7 p.m. Nov. 10. The program will feature early childhood intervention professionals explaining how to use short stories with simple text and pictures to reinforce accepted and proper behavior for children ages 18 months to 6 years. The program offers a safe space to connect with both professionals and other families and will not be recorded. The first 20 households who register and sign on to Zoom will get a free social story kit to make at home – one kit per household.

This program is presented in partnership with Westlake Porter Public Library and is supported by a grant from GPD Employees’ Foundation. The Virtual Early Childhood Education Series is sponsored by the

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