USA TODAY Sports college football staff picks for Week 14

On a weekend that was supposed to be the final one of the college football season, the schedule looks more like one you would see in September. There’s some quality games, but nothing that would appear to have much influence on the top teams. 

Clemson passes Ohio State in Amway Coaches Poll

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The biggest test for the College Football Playoff contenders sees No. 6 Texas A&M travel to Auburn. The Aggies need an impressive win to bolster their case with  the committee, but they struggled last week to put away LSU. The Tigers have the ability to making things difficult, especially if quarterback Bo Nix can put together four consistent quarters.



a group of football players playing a football game: Auburn wide receiver Seth Williams (18) is tackled by Texas A&M defensive back Demani Richardson during their 2019 game at Kyle Field.


© John Glaser, USA TODAY Sports
Auburn wide receiver Seth Williams (18) is tackled by Texas A&M defensive back Demani Richardson during their 2019 game at Kyle Field.

There’s a big game in the Big Ten with No. 11 Indiana still in contention to represent the East in the conference championship game. The Hoosiers, however, will face a challenge at No. 19 Wisconsin after losing quarterback Michael Penix Jr., the conference’s leader in passing yards, to a season-ending knee injury.

From NFL plays to college sports scores, all the top sports news you need to know every day.

WHAT TO WATCH: Five biggest questions for Week 14 in college football 

QB RANKINGS: Clemson’s Lawrence makes major move after return

ANALYSIS: Winners and losers from the College Football Playoff rankings

In the Group of Five, there’s a rare non-conference showdown of unbeatens that sees No. 8 Brigham Young travel to No. 14 Coastal Carolina. The game was put together on short notice after Liberty had to drop out of playing the Chanticleers due to COVID-19 issues. A win would provide a huge boost to the Cougars in their bid to play in the New Year’s Six. Costal Carolina has similar aspirations, but it would likely be as the Sun Belt champion if Cincinnati were to lose. A win Saturday would significantly help its case.





© Provided by USA TODAY SPORTS


This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: USA TODAY Sports college football staff picks for Week 14

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

University-industry partnership drives UB health care innovation – UB Now: News and views for UB faculty and staff

Research News

Inside the lab at Garwood Medical Devices.

Jackson Hobble, a biomedical engineer at Garwood Medical Devices and a UB biomedical engineering graduate, works in the company’s lab. He is using an in vitro model to test the electrical stimulation technique that BioPrax™ employs to treat infections. Photo: Douglas Levere

By JESSICA SZKLANY

Published December 2, 2020

headshot of Mark Ehrensberger.

Batman and Robin. Peanut butter and jelly. Jobs and Wozniak. Like for these famous duos, when universities and companies join forces, they can achieve far greater impact.

Such is the case for a team of UB researchers and Buffalo-based startup Garwood Medical Devices, who, in partnership, have been awarded $749,000 to evaluate a medical device that utilizes UB-licensed technology and bring it one step closer to clinical use in amputee patients.

The device, called BioPrax™, was created to prevent, control and eliminate bacterial biofilm infections associated with orthopedic implants — a common, costly and potentially devastating problem.

“Metallic implants, such as knee and hip replacements, are prone to getting antibiotic-resistant biofilm infections, which are nearly impossible to cure without removing the implant altogether,” says Wayne Bacon, president and chief executive officer of Garwood Medical Devices. “After removing orthopedic implants, there is a high percentage of failure to ever re-implant another joint replacement, costing patients and the health care system tens of billions of dollars per year and leading to many joint fusions, amputations and deaths.”

The technology behind BioPrax, a cathodic voltage-controlled electrical stimulation (CVCES), is patented by UB and Syracuse University and exclusively licensed by Garwood. When an infection is present, BioPrax delivers the electrical stimulation to a metal implant, such as a prosthetic knee, where it has an antibacterial effect and kills the infecting bacteria.

“We believe this novel infection-control strategy has the potential to introduce a paradigm shift in the treatment of orthopedic implant-associated infections (IAIs), as it would allow for effective treatment without having to remove the implant, thereby maintaining biomechanical stability and mobility of the body segment, and reducing the morbidity and mortality rates associated with recalcitrant IAIs,” says Mark Ehrensberger, co-inventor of the CVCES technology and associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, a joint program of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB.

Ehrensberger is also director of the Kenneth A Krackow, MD, Orthopaedic Research Laboratory in the Department of Orthopaedics in the Jacobs School.

New grant focuses on helping disabled vets

Previous, nonclinical studies have proven the technology to be effective at disrupting biofilms and killing bacteria, and showed no deleterious impacts to tissue or bone. Last year, Garwood received Breakthrough Device designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expedite development and approval of BioPrax.

According to the FDA’s website, the Breakthrough Devices Program targets technologies “that provide for more effective treatment or diagnosis of life-threatening or irreversibly debilitating diseases or conditions.” The goal “is to provide patients and health care providers with timely access to these medical devices by speeding up their development, assessment and

Read more

Kyoto University students climb campus clock tower, clash with staff amid riot police presence



a group of people walking in front of a building: Students are seen on the roof of Kyoto University Clock Tower Centennial Hall on the university's Yoshida campus in Kyoto's Sakyo Ward, on Nov. 27, 2020, in this photo provide by a reader.


© The Mainichi
Students are seen on the roof of Kyoto University Clock Tower Centennial Hall on the university’s Yoshida campus in Kyoto’s Sakyo Ward, on Nov. 27, 2020, in this photo provide by a reader.

KYOTO — Riot police were deployed on a campus of the elite Kyoto University on Nov. 27 after students who had climbed a clock tower at the school clashed with staff.

Around noon that day, students set a ladder up on Clock Tower Centennial Hall on the university’s Yoshida campus in Kyoto’s Sakyo Ward, sparking a scuffle with staff who tried to stop them. Riot police were then summoned to the scene, entering the grounds through the front gate. The area was in an uproar for some time, but ultimately there were no injuries or arrests.

Students from the school’s Kumano-ryo dorm traditionally climb the clock tower during a festival at the residence. However, the university issued a notice on Nov. 25 declaring the custom “dangerous” and “an act of trespassing that infringes the Penal Code.” The university stated that it would “take stringent measures, including reporting infractions to police among other legal action” if the students tried to climb the tower.

During the standoff, the students hung banners from the clock tower and used a loudspeaker to slam the university’s refusal to negotiate. They also distributed flyers in the surrounding area.

Kyoto Prefectural Police told the Mainichi Shimbun, “A report was filed, and we entered the campus to prevent possible danger. We cannot reveal specifics about policing conditions.”

(Japanese original by Reiko Nakajima and Norikazu Chiba, Kyoto Bureau)

Source Article

Read more

Queen’s University slammed as zero hours staff sidelined

A trade union has branded the response of Queen’s University to a collective grievance raised by zero hours employees at student union facilities which have had to close temporarily due to Covid restrictions as “disgraceful”.

nite said the decision not to place employees on furlough now leaves zero hours workers facing impoverishment, with almost half of the workers also losing their accommodation due to financial hardship.

The union called the response from the university as “among the most callous received from any employer during this pandemic”.

But Queen’s University said it was left with no choice, with no reasonable expectation of some sections of the university being able to reopen in the foreseeable future and no commitment to provide casual hours of work in this academic year, leaving staff no longer eligible for the scheme.

“Queen’s flatly refused to avail of government furlough payments under the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme to obtain pay supports for casual and zero hours workers at student union facilities,” said Unite Hospitality organiser, Neil Moore.

“Almost half of these workers are students trying to work their way through college; they can’t access income support benefits, leaving them facing a real financial crisis. In a recent survey, 92% told us the loss of this work had affected their studies already.

“Devastatingly, 45% of our members told us they’ve lost their living accommodation as a result of losing this income. Many are being made technically homeless in the process.

“This action and the dreadful impact it will have is completely unnecessary. The financial supports exist to support these workers while these facilities are temporarily closed.

“Our members are genuinely shocked that Queen’s is refusing to lift a finger, at no cost to themselves, to support them.”

Mr Moore added: “In less than 24 hours, more than 800 signed a solidarity petition calling on Queen’s to avail of the government’s furlough scheme.”

In a statement Queen’s responded: “The university has successfully moved many of its core functions online but there are some services, critical to the successful operation of the university in normal times, which could not be provided as a result of ongoing restrictions.

“This includes The Speakeasy, the Students’ Union Bar, which is not now expected to open during this academic year,” a spokesperson said.

“The university has utilised the Government’s furlough scheme (CJRS) for staff who are considered to meet the eligibility criteria laid out by the HM Revenue and Customs, and has topped up the pay of those impacted to 100%.

“The furlough scheme can only be offered to part-time or casual staff where work has been assigned to them that cannot take place.

“As there has been no reasonable expectation of the Speakeasy reopening and no commitment to provide casual hours of work this academic year, unfortunately, these staff are no longer eligible for the CJRS.”

The statement added: “The university fully appreciates that this is a challenging time for our community and has taken steps to support students who are suffering financial

Read more

USA TODAY Sports college football staff picks for Week 13

Thanksgiving weekend typically is the time where team are crafting their final cases for inclusion into the College Football Playoff or playing for conference championships or bragging rights with rivals.

What the committee got right, and wrong, in first CFP rankings

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The season, of course, is different. There’s still three weeks to go after Saturday, meaning the weekend has a new feel. Those in-state showdowns of non-conference opponents are gone. Some of the bigger games of the season have been pushed later.

There’s still much to savor during the holiday.

From NFL plays to college sports scores, all the top sports news you need to know every day.

There’s the Iron Bowl, where No. 1 Alabama hosts No. 19 Auburn. It’s the last ranked opponent on the schedule for the Crimson Tide before a potential showdown in the SEC title game with Florida. The Tigers would like nothing better than to spoil the season of their biggest rival.

No. 2 Notre Dame travels to No. 23 North Carolina in what is its toughest challenge before a likely appearance in the ACC championship game. The Irish need only win two of their final three games to secure their spot. But the Tar Heels are eager to earn a signature win in Mack Brown’s second season.



a group of football players on the field: Alabama running back Najee Harris carries the ball while being tackled by Auburn linebacker Zakoby McClain during their game at Jordan-Hare Stadium.


© John David Mercer, USA TODAY Sports
Alabama running back Najee Harris carries the ball while being tackled by Auburn linebacker Zakoby McClain during their game at Jordan-Hare Stadium.

PLAYOFF ANALYSIS: Winners and losers from the first ranking release

TIDE ON TOP: Alabama leads first College Football Playoff committee ranking 

QUARTERBACK RANKINGS: Florida’s Kyle Trask leads with three ACC players in top 10

The third game matching ranked opponents has big ramifications in the Big 12. No. 15 Iowa State can all but secure a spot in its first conference title game with a win at No. 21 Texas. The Longhorns also would be in prime position to reach Arlington, Texas, by knocking off the Cyclones.





© Provided by USA TODAY SPORTS


This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: USA TODAY Sports college football staff picks for Week 13

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

Oakland University offers COVID-19 sensing, tracking devices to students, staff amid rising cases

The first batch of BioButtons has arrived at Oakland University as cases of COVID-19 increase on campus and throughout Michigan.

The university received 1,500 of the wearable devices for students and faculty and began distributing them at the beginning of the week, said David Stone, OU’S chief research officer.

The devices, purchased from Denver-based BioIntelliSense for $90,000, are being used for early detection of the coronavirus by measuring temperature and vital signs. Funded through federal CARES Act money, they are being offered free of charge to OU students and employees.

“This is a way to limit outbreaks,” Stone said. “We want to keep one case in a dorm from becoming 50.”

COVID-19 cases tied to OU remained in the single digits this fall until the last week in October, when 29 commuter students tested positive for the coronavirus, according to university data. The following week, OU had an outbreak on campus with 13 residential students testing positive along with another 47 commuters.

Many colleges and universities in Michigan became coronavirus hot spots when classes resumed in late August and early September. That caused Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to temporarily suspend in-person learning and some schools, including University of Michigan, to tell students to stay home in the winter.

Nearly all classes at Oakland this fall have been online, although 1,700 students remain living on campus. The university has yet to decide what proportion of classes will be conducted in-person for winter, Stone said.

OU contemplated making the BioButton devices mandatory for those on campus but quickly scrapped the idea. Stone said the more students who do opt into wearing the BioButton, the better the chances of containing outbreaks and keeping campus open.

The biggest hurdle will be getting students comfortable with the idea of wearing a data tracker, he said.

“We’ve done very little marketing, and we certainly haven’t knocked down a lot of concerns about student privacy,” he said. “We’re trying to get students to understand that their health data isn’t compromised… We really did design this in a way that the university does not get anybody’s data.”

Here’s how the BioButton works: The medical grade device about the size of a half dollar sticks to the upper chest and connects via Bluetooth to a mobile phone app, which alerts users to potential symptoms of the coronavirus. Additionally, if someone wearing a BioButton tests positive for the virus, the app alerts other BioButton users who were in close proximity to that individual.

The device is used for contact tracing, but it does not track the movement of students, Stone said. The BioButton has a lifespan of about 90 days.

A couple hundred of the devices have been claimed so far. Stone said he expects more to be distributed next week when classes resume after Thanksgiving. He said the university expects to purchase more to meet demand.

“We have lots of students going home to families,” he said. “We still think there’s real value individually to people knowing their status.”

S

Read more

USA TODAY Sports college football staff picks for Week 12

As much as this college football season has been different and ever-changing, the drama of the final weeks of the season remains the same. Teams are positioning for College Football Playoff or trying to push for conference titles as Thanksgiving weekend draws closer

Alabama remains at No. 1 followed by Notre Dame in Amway Coaches Poll

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The headline games of the Week 12 start in the Big Ten with division supremacy on the line in both the East and West. No. 3 Ohio State gets a visit from 10th-ranked Indiana in a game seen as a throwaway at the start of the season that is now the game that will likely decide one of the two teams in the conference championship game.



a group of baseball players playing a football game: Wisconsin wide receiver Danny Davis III tries to avoid the tackle of Northwestern defensive back Cameron Ruiz during their 2019 game at Camp Randall Stadium.


© Jeff Hanisch, USA TODAY Sports
Wisconsin wide receiver Danny Davis III tries to avoid the tackle of Northwestern defensive back Cameron Ruiz during their 2019 game at Camp Randall Stadium.

No. 12 Wisconsin has been impressive in each of its two wins, but its schedule has been limited by COVID-19. No. 20 Northwestern has the advantage of four wins under its belt when it hosts the Badgers in what likely will be a winner-take-all matchup in the West.

From NFL plays to college sports scores, all the top sports news you need to know every day.

LOOKING AHEAD: Five biggest questions for Week 12 in college football

QB RANKINGS: Florida’s Kyle Trask zooms to the head of the class

BOWL PROJECTIONS: Notre Dame bolsters College Football Playoff case

The third matchup of ranked opponents takes us to Oklahoma. The annual Bedlam showdown between Oklahoma and Oklahoma State again will have an influence on the Big 12 race. The Sooners have won five consecutive conference titles, but cannot afford a loss after early stumbles this year against Kansas State and Iowa State. The Cowboys would be in position to reach their first conference title game with a win.

Elsewhere, No. 7 Cincinnati will look to bolster its playoff case with a road win against Central Florida. The Bearcats have been dominant all season, and this is the kind of year a Group of Five team could get into the mix if things fall its way.





© Provided by USA TODAY SPORTS


This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: USA TODAY Sports college football staff picks for Week 12

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

University staff voice concerns at being asked to test students for Covid

University staff have voiced concern after their employers asked them to join a hastily assembled army of workers who will carry out mass Covid-19 testing of students before the pre-Christmas exodus home.



a tall building in a city: Photograph: Gary Calton/The Observer


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Gary Calton/The Observer

They include staff at the University of Sussex, whose vice-chancellor sent out an email saying it was only with their help that a mass testing programme – which could be rolled out in just under two weeks – would succeed. More than 100 members of staff there are understood to have volunteered already.

“The mass testing programme will entail very significant challenges in an extremely short time period, and we are planning the logistics now so that we are as prepared as possible,” Adam Tickell, the university’s vice-chancellor, told staff in an email on Wednesday.

He said about 100 members of staff would be required each day to work on campus, from Monday 30 November to Friday 11 December.

Warwick and Sheffield Hallam are among other universities that have reportedly asked staff to help with the roll out of testing.

Video: Fails Compilation! -Part 2 (Cover Video)

Fails Compilation! -Part 2

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

“It speaks to the holes in the planning around student return that we have been warning about,” said Vicky Blake, president of the University and College Union (UCU). “We asked who will be doing the testing, and I have to say it is both shocking but not a surprise that it looks like they want staff to do it.”



a tall building: Sheffield Hallam University is one of the institutions that has reportedly asked staff to help with the roll out of testing.


© Photograph: Gary Calton/The Observer
Sheffield Hallam University is one of the institutions that has reportedly asked staff to help with the roll out of testing.

She said concerns among staff ranged from what PPE would be available to who would be responsible if false negatives resulted in infections being carried home. Junior and newer staff felt pressured to take part, particularly at a time when job cuts loomed over many campuses, she said.

A University of Sussex spokesperson said it had asked staff to consider whether they would be able to volunteer at its testing centre, and that those roles would be “instead of, not on top of, their usual duties”. All volunteers will continue to receive their normal pay.

Roles will include coordinating queueing, registering students, advising on how to take the test, processing tests and recording results. Full training and PPE would be provided, the university said.

The government announced this month that students in England would be given a six-day window in December in which to travel home before Christmas, with mass testing carried out on campuses before they are allowed to leave.

A mass exodus will take place on staggered departure dates set by universities from 3 December to 9 December, after England’s four-week lockdown is due to end, under plans announced by the Department for Education (DfE). Students testing positive would need to remain in self-isolation for 10 days.

Similar plans are being rolled out in Northern Ireland,

Read more

Trump’s Ex-Education Chief of Staff Won’t Vote for Him, Implores ‘All Patriotic Republicans’ to Join Him

The former Chief of Staff for the U.S. Department of Education in President Donald Trump’s administration published an op-ed on Thursday saying that he won’t vote for the Republican president and implored “all patriotic Republicans to join” him.



a clock on the front of a crowd: President Donald Trump gives a campaign speech just four days before Election Day outside of Raymond James Stadium on October 29, 2020 in Tampa, Florida.


© Octavio Jones/Getty
President Donald Trump gives a campaign speech just four days before Election Day outside of Raymond James Stadium on October 29, 2020 in Tampa, Florida.

Josh Venable, who worked under Education Secretary Betsy Devos, published the op-ed in The Detroit News with a title that read, “As a Republican, I’m tired of Trump’s division, discord, vitriol and hate.”

“I am a lifelong Republican. And I am exhausted. Nearly all my career, I have worked for Republican candidates and conservative causes, managing campaigns, organizing coalitions and raising money,” Venable wrote. “I served as U.S. Department of Education chief of staff in the Trump administration. But this is 2020, so of course this year is different. I cannot vote for the Republican nominee for president. For the good of the party I have supported my entire life, but more importantly, for the sake of the country I love, I implore all patriotic Republicans to join me.”

Former Department Of Homeland Security Staffer, Miles Taylor Revealed He Is “Anonymous”

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Venable went on to state that he believed the presidency is more important than a number of things such as advancing an individual policy, political appointment and “more important than ‘winning’.”

Venable accused Trump of thriving on “purposely sowing strife and discord” and said he “does so at the expense of the nation’s interests, the health and prosperity of our fellow citizens, alliances forged through generations of sacrifice, and the personal safety of public servants.”

Venable also commented on the recent report of a plot to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Trump’s subsequent response.

“Instead of a prompt and unequivocal denouncement, the president responded with a chuckle to his supporters’ ‘Lock her up’!’ chants in Muskegon, then decreed: ‘Lock them all up!’,” he wrote.

Venable served as DeVos’ Chief of Staff from the beginning of Trump’s presidency until he resigned in 2018, and has since been named an adviser to the Republican Political Alliance for Integrity and Reform, a group that was created by Miles Taylor, a former official for the Department of Homeland Security.

The group is made up of a number of former Trump administration officials and Republican lawmakers, that oppose Trump.

Newsweek reached out to the Republican Political Alliance for Integrity and Reform for comment.

Taylor’s name recently made headlines after he revealed on Wednesday that he was the author of an anonymous op-ed published in the New York Times in 2018, criticizing Trump.

In Venable’s op-ed, he adds that he is tired “of the division, discord, chaos, vitriol and hate.”

“I am tired of your failure and refusal to lead,” Venable wrote. “Our party can — and must — do better. America deserves nothing less from us.”

Venable’s op-ed comes less than

Read more

AL.com college football staff picks for Week 6

We’re passing the halfway point of the regular season in the SEC, and such is the case with AL.com’s college football staff picks.

Scroll along below to find out how various AL.com sports staffers see this week’s games playing out. In addition, we’ll provide predicted scores for this week’s Alabama and Auburn games.

A reminder that these picks are AGAINST THE SPREAD. That means that each person’s selection doesn’t necessarily mean he or she thinks that team will win outright, just that it will cover the point spread.

Here’s a Halloween weekend edition of the picks (all times Central and all games Saturday unless noted):

Louisiana-Monroe at South Alabama football

South Alabama cornerback Devin Rockette (6) returns an interception 95 yards for a touchdown against Louisiana-Monroe in the first half of a NCAA football game Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, at Hancock Whitney Stadium in Mobile, Ala. (Mike Kittrell/AL.com)

South Alabama (+6) at Georgia Southern, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, ESPN

Michael Casagrande: Georgia Southern

Joseph Goodman: Georgia Southern

Tom Green: Georgia Southern

Patrick Greenfield: South Alabama

Giana Han: Georgia Southern

Mark Heim: Georgia Southern

Mark Inabinett: Georgia Southern

Mike Rodak: Georgia Southern

Creg Stephenson: Georgia Southern

John Talty: South Alabama

Desmond Ridder

Cincinnati quarterback Desmond Ridder (9) evades the tackle of SMU safety Roderick Roberson, Jr. (13) on a touchdown run during the second half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Dallas. (AP Photo/Jeffrey McWhorter)AP

Memphis (+6.5) at Cincinnati, 11 a.m., ESPN

Michael Casagrande: Cincinnati

Joseph Goodman: Cincinnati

Tom Green: Cincinnati

Patrick Greenfield: Memphis

Giana Han: Cincinnati

Mark Heim: Cincinnati

Mark Inabinett: Cincinnati

Mike Rodak: Cincinnati

Creg Stephenson: Cincinnati

John Talty: Memphis

Joe Milton

Michigan quarterback Joe Milton celebrates his touchdown against Minnesota in the third quarter of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Minneapolis. Michigan won 49-24. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)AP

Michigan State (+25) at Michigan, 11 a.m., Fox

Michael Casagrande: Michigan State

Joseph Goodman: Michigan State

Tom Green: Michigan State

Patrick Greenfield: Michigan State

Giana Han: Michigan State

Mark Heim: Michigan State

Mark Inabinett: Michigan State

Mike Rodak: Michigan State

Creg Stephenson: Michigan

John Talty: Michigan State

Garrett Wilson

Ohio State receiver Garrett Wilson plays against Nebraska during an NCAA college football game Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)AP

Ohio State (-13) at Penn State, 6:30 p.m., ABC

Michael Casagrande: Ohio State

Joseph Goodman: Penn State

Tom Green: Ohio State

Patrick Greenfield: Ohio State

Giana Han: Ohio State

Mark Heim: Ohio State

Mark Inabinett: Penn State

Mike Rodak: Ohio State

Creg Stephenson: Ohio State

John Talty: Ohio State

Kellen Mond, Isaiah Spiller

Texas A&M quarterback Kellen Mond (11) hands off to running back Isaiah Spiller (28) during the first half of an NCAA college football game against Mississippi State in Starkville, Miss., Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)AP

Arkansas (+11) at Texas A&M, 6 p.m., ESPN

Michael Casagrande: Texas A&M

Joseph Goodman: Arkansas

Tom Green: Texas A&M

Patrick Greenfield: Texas A&M

Giana Han: Arkansas

Mark Heim: Texas A&M

Mark Inabinett: Texas A&M

Mike Rodak: Arkansas

Creg

Read more