LSU, Penn State and the 2020 stumbles of college football’s power programs come to light in Week 14

It has been just 11 months since LSU topped Clemson 42-25 in the College Football Playoff National Championship, completing what might have been the best season by a team in the sport’s history. And it already feels ancient.

On Saturday, LSU will stumble toward its 2020 finish line with a makeup date against Alabama that perfectly encapsulates all that has gone wrong for the Tigers in the past 11 months.

This week, head coach Ed Orgeron lamented the latest opt-out of a star player, as WR Terrace Marshall ended his time with the program. Orgeron spoke glowingly of his former players, the stars of 2019, now off to spectacular starts in the NFL. He did his best to add some optimism to a lost season, promising the 3-4 Tigers would “be champions again” at some point.

But when Orgeron was asked whether his team was better equipped today to face Alabama than it would have been three weeks ago, when the game was originally scheduled to be played, his answer felt pretty telling of all that 2020 has wrought for the defending champs.

“Yes,” Orgeron said, “because now we have enough players to play the game.”

After winning the CFP championship last season, 2020 has been much harder on Ed Orgeron and 3-4 LSU. AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

LSU is among the most prominent examples of 2020’s misfortunes.

But Orgeron’s misery is nothing compared to what has happened at Penn State. The Nittany Lions won their first game of the season last week, but that’s hardly enough to forget how inept they looked during an unprecedented 0-5 start. Now, Penn State travels to Rutgers this weekend with more potential embarrassment waiting around every corner.

The team Penn State beat last weekend might be in a worse position. Michigan just canceled its game with Maryland this weekend, COVID-19’s intrusion into the Wolverines’ locker room the latest problem for embattled coach Jim Harbaugh.

Look around the standings and it’s not hard to find programs that ended 2019 on a high note — Louisville, Baylor, Utah, Tennessee — that might now be wondering if playing this season was worth all the trouble. And that doesn’t even touch on Nebraska. No team has ever pushed harder or argued louder for the right to go 1-4.

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Orgeron, for one, refused to blame COVID-19 for the setbacks, but it is fair to wonder whether LSU-Alabama or Tennessee-Florida or Virginia Tech-Clemson might be a whole lot more interesting if everything off the field in 2020 had been — well, a whole lot less interesting.

“Nobody wants to go through a season like this, but I do believe we’re building character and grit that will help us later on,” Orgeron said. “You always have to represent LSU with pride, and the standard is very high. We haven’t met that. I’m not going

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Waste Milk Could Be Used to Reduce Power Plant CO2 Emissions, Says Clarkson University Research

Clarkson University research is featured on the front cover of the November issue of Advanced Sustainable Systems. The stylized cover artwork (above) features a North Country landmark, the surge tank of a Raquette River hydroelectric plant in nearby Hannawa Falls, where both of the paper’s authors reside. (Photo credit: J. Pokrzywinski, D. Aulakh, W. Verdegaal, V.H. Pham, H. Bilan, S. Marble, D. Mitlin, M. Wriedt: “Dry and Wet CO2 Capture from Milk-Derived Microporous Carbons with Tuned Hydrophobicity.” Advanced Sustainable Systems. 2020. Volume 4. Issue 11. Pages 207022. Copyright Wiley-VCH GmbH. Reproduced with permission.)

Clarkson University research is featured on the front cover of the November issue of Advanced Sustainable Systems. The stylized cover artwork (above) features a North Country landmark, the surge tank of a Raquette River hydroelectric plant in nearby Hannawa Falls, where both of the paper’s authors reside. (Photo credit: J. Pokrzywinski, D. Aulakh, W. Verdegaal, V.H. Pham, H. Bilan, S. Marble, D. Mitlin, M. Wriedt: “Dry and Wet CO2 Capture from Milk-Derived Microporous Carbons with Tuned Hydrophobicity.” Advanced Sustainable Systems. 2020. Volume 4. Issue 11. Pages 207022. Copyright Wiley-VCH GmbH. Reproduced with permission.)

Potsdam, NY, Nov. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Clarkson University research, which shows how surplus milk may be used to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil‐fuel based power plant emissions, is featured on the front cover of the November issue of  Advanced Sustainable Systems.

The stylized cover artwork features a North Country landmark, the surge tank of a Raquette River hydroelectric plant in nearby Hannawa Falls, where two of the paper’s authors reside.

Two major sources of greenhouse gases are CO2 emissions from fossil-based power plants and methane emissions from cattle. There is a strong scientific consensus that emissions like these are causing human-induced climate change.

The article, “CO2 Capture: Dry and Wet CO2 Capture from Milk‐Derived Microporous Carbons with Tuned Hydrophobicity,” explains that it is possible to greatly reduce power plant CO2 emissions by using surplus or waste milk from cows to create activated carbons, which will adsorb or scrub the CO2 from the output.

“Our challenge was to create an inexpensive ‘green’ activated carbon,” says co-author Associate Professor of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science and Kodak CAMP Distinguished Professor Mario Wriedt. “Powdered milk can be converted into advanced activated carbons with the right porosity and surface chemistry to adsorb the CO2, allowing much better control than with the current materials used for this process, like coconut shells or coal.”

This is the first report of state-of-the-art performance for an activated carbon derived from a natural compound. The process for making the sorbents is similar to what is done to roast coffee, but with a secondary agent that etches nanoscale holes onto the material.

“Think of extremely dark roast holey coffee beans,” says co-author University of Texas at Austin and former Clarkson Professor David Mitlin. “The nanoscale holes, because of their strict sizes and surface chemistry, are very effective in trapping CO2 while keeping out water vapor. The CO2 is trapped reversibly in the

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College Football Power Rankings: Clemson moves up to No. 3, Iowa State soars into top 10


1


Notre Dame

North Carolina had Notre Dame on the run until the Fighting Irish turned into themselves in the second half. A 14-0 run ended an easy 31-17 win that brought ND closer to the ACC Championship Game. It seems almost an insult call Ian Book an above average game manager. He had 327 yards of total offense. — 9-0
2


Alabama

The Crimson Tide somehow competed without Nick Saban (out with COVID-19) in the building. Mac Jones made up for his pair of pick sixes in last year’s Iron Bowl with five touchdown passes in a 42-13 laugher over Auburn. DeVonta Smith has six touchdowns over the last three games. Maybe we should reevaluate Saban’s value to the team. (Just kidding.) — 8-0
3


Clemson

Who was this No. 16 kid with the long hair at quarterback? I didn’t recognize him. Wait, that was Trevor Lawrence? I’d forgotten he was on the team. It had been five weeks since he played. Anyway, this Lawrence kid has a future. He threw for 402 yards and two touchdowns against Pittsburgh. Afterward, TL tipped his hand referencing his “last night in Death Valley.” 1 8-1
4


Ohio State

Idle. An outbreak in Franklin County (Ohio) and an outbreak within the Buckeyes caused the cancellation of the Illinois game. They’re all must win from here on in (at Michigan State, at home against Michigan) as Ohio State hopes for that Big Ten title game bullet point. 1 4-0
5


Florida

Kyle Trask is reaaallly slacking. His second straight game with only three touchdown passes resulted in a 34-10 win over Kentucky. Kyle Pitts returned to catch all three of those scores from Trask. Pitts has 11 on the year or one for every half of football he’s played. For the first time since 2008, the Gators have defeated four SEC opponents by at least 20 points. They can clinch the SEC East this week at Tennessee. — 7-1
6


Cincinnati

Idle. The Temple game was wiped out. The best the Bearcats can do is 10-0. Their competition, as it stands, is Alabama (if it loses the SEC title game), Notre Dame (if it loses the ACC title game, though it may get in anyway), Texas A&M, Ohio State and Northwestern. Coach Luke Fickell continues to emerge as a candidate as jobs begin to open. — 8-0
7


BYU

Idle. No blame from here on passing on the Washington game. No need for the Cougars to schedule a Pac-12 game to have it pulled out from underneath them later in the week. The Pac-12 allows schools to drop nonconference opponents through Thursday if a Pac-12 opponent becomes available. Washington eventually picked up Utah last week. — 9-0
8


Texas A&M

In the rain on an off night, the Aggies slogged their way past LSU, 20-7. Kellen Mond was horrid, going 11 of 34 for 105 yards. Is this the look of a playoff team? 1 6-1
9


Indiana

The Hoosiers won the game
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College Basketball Power Rankings – Upsets shake up top 10 as V Week begins

The 2020-21 college basketball season is one filled with change, so over here at the Power Rankings, we’re making changes too. Of course, you can still find our top 16 teams in the country every Monday morning, but we’re adding a few wrinkles this season. We will hand out awards — Player, Team, Win and Coach of the Week — and ask questions of three teams that struggled in the week that was. In other words, fewer meandering words in the introduction from me; we’re going to dive right into the best and brightest in college basketball each week.

And as far as the rankings go, expect plenty of change there, as well. The upcoming week will be no different. With V Week starting Tuesday — go here for more information — there are four marquee games on the docket on back-to-back nights: Kentucky vs. Kansas and Michigan State at Duke on Tuesday; and Illinois vs. Baylor and Gonzaga vs. West Virginia on Wednesday.

Team of the Week: Gonzaga Bulldogs

It’s not often we’re going to put the No. 1 team in the country in this spot, but the biggest talking point coming out of the first week of the season was how dominant Gonzaga looked as compared to the rest of college basketball. Mark Few’s team would’ve been No. 1 in my preseason top 25 had those rankings come out after Andrew Nembhard received his waiver to play immediately, and with the Florida transfer in the fold, there’s not a better offensive team in the country. Scoring 102 against Kansas and then beating Auburn by 23? No team had a better week.

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Big Ten power rankings: Conference’s College Football Playoff hopes are now slim

COVID-19 might be the only thing that can slow down Ohio State. For Northwestern, it was one-win Michigan State.

And just like that, the Big Ten’s playoff hopes may be close to vanishing.

It’s unclear when the Buckeyes will return to the field, and even though the eye test may say yes, their resume will be a few games short than others, at least. An unbeaten Wildcats’ team probably carries the conference’s flag into the CFP, but not after losing as a double-digit favorite to the Spartans.

On to this week’s rankings:

14. NEBRASKA (1-4)

The Cornhuskers hung in there against Iowa, even tied at halftime, but ultimately lost, 26-20. After the game, the storyline was Scott Frost complaining about Iowa’s sideline clapping to throw off his quarterbacks’ snap counts. Maybe what kept Adrian Martinez and Luke McCaffrey out of rhythm was the constant rotation. Just a thought. After struggling during his time early, Martinez was 18 of 20 passing of 174 yards and also ran for a TD. (Last week: 13)

Up next: Nebraska at Purdue, 12 p.m. Saturday

College football: Michigan vs. Penn State – November 28, 2020

Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh walks off the field with defensive lineman Donovan Jeter (95) after Jeter was hurt on a play in the third quarter of their Big Ten football game against Penn State at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, on Saturday, November 28, 2020. Penn State won the game, 27-17. Michigan is now 2-4 on the season. (Mike Mulholland | MLive.com)Mike Mulholland | MLive.com

13. MICHIGAN (2-4)

So much for momentum. So much for the Cade McNamara takeover at QB. The spark from the overtime Rutgers win already has burned out, as well as any life left in the season. McNamara was just 12 of 25 for 91 yards, and the tone of the game was set when Penn State marched right down the field for an opening touchdown. On the positive side, Hassan Haskins had 101 yards and two touchdowns on 17 carries. By the team’s body language, the other positive is that there is only a few weeks left in this season. (Last week: 12)

Up next: Michigan vs. Maryland, 3:30 p.m. Saturday

College football: Michigan vs. Penn State – November 28, 2020

Michigan defensive back Hunter Reynolds (27) tackles Penn State wide receiver Jahan Dotson (5) in the fourth quarter of their Big Ten football game at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, on Saturday, November 28, 2020. Penn State won the game, 27-17. Michigan is now 2-4 on the season. (Mike Mulholland | MLive.com)Mike Mulholland | MLive.com

12. PENN STATE (1-5)

Sean Clifford didn’t throw a TD pass and only had 163 yards through the air, but the Nittany Lions QB was feeling good after the game. That tends to happen after facing the Michigan defense. Penn State got in the win column on the backs of its offensive line, and a running game that was sparked by freshman Kevyvone Lee (134 yards, 22 carries) and the running quarterbacks. Penn State’s RB room has been decimated by injury, and Lee was the team’s first

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Researchers explore population size, density in rise of centralized power in antiquity

Researchers explore population size, density in rise of centralized power in antiquity
Ruins of the Temple of the Amphitheatre in the Late Preceramic Period archaeological site of Caral in Peru. Credit: Courtesy of Daniel Sandweiss

Early populations shifted from quasi-egalitarian hunter-gatherer societies to communities governed by a centralized authority in the middle to late Holocene, but how the transition occurred still puzzles anthropologists. A University of Maine-led group of researchers contend that population size and density served as crucial drivers.


Anthropology professor Paul “Jim” Roscoe led the development of Power Theory, a model emphasizing the role of demography in political centralization, and applied it to the shift in power dynamics in prehistoric northern coastal societies in Peru.

To test the theory, he, Daniel Sandweiss, professor of anthropology and Quaternary and climate studies, and Erick Robinson, a postdoctoral anthropology researcher at Utah State University, created a summed probability distribution (SPD) from 755 radiocarbon dates from 10,000-1,000 B.P., or before present.

The team found a correlation between the tenets of their Power Theory, or that population density and size influence political centralization, and the change in power dynamics in early Peruvian societies.

The team shared their findings in a report published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

“I’ve always been interested in how, in the space of just five to 10,000 years, humans went from biddy little hunter-gatherer groups in which nobody could really push anyone else around to vast industrial states governed by a few people with enormous power. From my fieldwork and other research in New Guinea, it became clear that leaders mainly emerged in large, high-density populations, and Power Theory explained why,” Roscoe says. “Unfortunately, it was difficult until recently for archaeologists to get a handle on the size and densities of populations in the past. SPD techniques are a major help in bringing these important variables into understanding how human social life underwent this dramatic transformation.”

Scientists have previously posited that population in northern coastal Peru rose during the Late Preceramic, Initial, Early Horizon and Early Intermediate periods, or between about 6,000-1,200 B.P. The SPD from Roscoe and his colleagues validates the notion.

The people who settled in the coastal plain first lived as mobile hunter-gatherers or incipient horticulturalists in low density groups, according to researchers. Millennia afterward in the Late Preceramic period, however, several developments brought increased interaction and shareable resources. People began farming, developed irrigation systems and became more settled as time passed. Eventually, some of the world’s first ‘pristine’ states formed in the plain.

The onset and growth of agriculture, irrigation and sedentism, propelled by upticks in population size and density, fostered the capacity of political agents to interact with and manipulate others. Political centralization and hierarchy formed as a result, according to researchers.

Roscoe and his colleagues demonstrated through their radio-carbon SPD that the rise in centralized authorities in early Peruvian communities that resulted from farming, irrigation and settlement coincided with an uptick in population size. The results of their work demonstrate “a broad, low-resolution congruence between the expectations of Power Theory and

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Vanderbilt’s Sarah Fuller becomes first woman to play in Power 5 college football game

Fuller took the opening kickoff in the third quarter. The low kick sailed 30 yards before Missouri’s Mason Pack downed it at his team’s 35-yard line.

“Ladies and Gentlemen, you have witnessed history,” Vanderbilt Football tweeted with a video of Fuller being congratulated on the sideline after the kick.

She became the first woman to officially take the field during a football game in a Southeastern Conference and Power 5 Conference game, according to the Vanderbilt athletics’ website.

The Power 5 is made up of the biggest athletic conferences, including the SEC, Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), Big Ten Conference, Big 12 Conference and Pac-12 Conference.

“I think it’s amazing and incredible. But I’m also trying to separate that because I know this is a job I need to do and I want to help the team out and I want to do the best that I can,” Fuller told the school before the game. “Placing that historical aspect aside just helps me focus in on what I need to do. I don’t want to let them down in any way.”
Vanderbilt kicker Sarah Fuller adjusts her helmet during NCAA college football practice on  Wednesday, November 25, 2020, in Nashville, Tennessee.
Fuller is a goalkeeper for the Vanderbilt women’s soccer team. Her opportunity came because many of Vanderbilt’s specialists are in quarantine due to Covid-19, according to the school and ESPN. Head football coach Derek Mason told ESPN Fuller “is an option for us.”

“She’s got a strong leg. We’ll see what that yields,” Mason told the sports network. “We’ll figure out what that looks like on Saturday.”

Fuller plans to wear the message “Play Like A Girl” on the back of her helmet Saturday to encourage other young women, according to Vanderbilt.

Two other women have also played in Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) contests, Vanderbilt says. Katie Hnida did it first when she kicked two extra points for the University of New Mexico against Texas State in 2003. Then came April Goss, who kicked an extra point for Kent State during their 2015 game against Delaware State.

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Vanderbilt kicker Sarah Fuller makes history as first woman to play in a Power Five college football game

Vanderbilt kicker Sarah Fuller made history on Saturday when she kicked off at the start of the second half against Missouri, making her the first woman to play a snap in a Power Five college football game. Fuller, a starting goalkeeper on the Commodores’ SEC championship women’s soccer team, joined the football program this week after Vanderbilt lost multiple specialists due to COVID-19 issues.

Fuller’s squib kick was recovered by Missouri at its own 35-yard line.

“I just want to tell all the girls out there that you can do anything you set your mind to. You really can. If you have that mentality all the way through, you can do big things,” Fuller said after the game, a 41-0 loss for the Commodores. 

“I think it’s amazing and incredible,” Fuller said Friday when it was determined she would dress and travel with Vanderbilt. “But I’m also trying to separate that because I know this is a job I need to do and I want to help the team out and I want to do the best that I can. Placing that historical aspect aside just helps me focus in on what I need to do. I don’t want to let them down in anyway. It’s an honor they called on me to be able to do this and help them out.”

Fuller joins Katie Hnida and April Goss as the only women to play in an FBS game. Hnida kicked two extra points for New Mexico against Texas State in 2003. She transferred to New Mexico from Colorado, where she did dress out but did not play in a game for the Buffaloes. Goss, who played at Kent State, kicked an extra point against Delaware State in 2015.

Four other women — Willamette’s Liz Heaton, Jacksonville State’s Ashley Martin, West Alabama’s Tonya Butler and Lebanon Valley’s Brittany Ryan — have also kicked in college football games at various levels ranging from NAIA to FCS. Heaton became the first woman to score in a college football game in 1997.

Fuller, a senior, had a wild week. She helped the Vanderbilt soccer team win the SEC Tournament last weekend when they topped Arkansas 3-1. It was the program’s first women’s SEC Tournament title since 1994. 

Derek Mason, the Commodores’ football coach, explained the process of how Fuller joined the team.

“I reached out to [soccer coach] Darren Ambrose — me and Darren are extremely close. Our teams are close, to be honest. Just wanted to see how Sarah would actually work as an option,” he said earlier this week. “I had her out, had a chance to look at what she can do with the football. She’s really good with the soccer ball, seems to be really good with the football. We’ll see. She’s an option. we’ll keep all our options open. We’ll see what she can do on Saturday if given the opportunity.”

Fuller helped Vanderbilt’s soccer team make history last Sunday. Six days later, she did it again for

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Vanderbilt kicker Sarah Fuller becomes first woman to play in Power Five game

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Here is a look at Vanderbilt football placekicker Sarah Fuller practicing. Fuller helped Vanderbilt women’s soccer win the SEC tournament this fall.

Nashville Tennessean

Sarah Fuller gave a passionate halftime speech to her Vanderbilt team — her football team, that is — on Saturday.

It was an eyebrow-raising revelation on a day that featured plenty of hyperbole.

Fuller’s boldness on a team she joined five days ago was incredible enough. That she spoke up with the historic distinction of becoming the first woman to play in a Power Five college football game put it over the top.

ESTES: History found Vanderbilt football’s Sarah Fuller, and it turns out she was perfect for it | Estes

Vanderbilt was trailing 21-0 to Missouri in a lackluster performance.

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Fuller, a Vanderbilt goalkeeper who won the SEC women’s soccer tournament title last Sunday, didn’t like the body language and lack of enthusiasm of her new football teammates.

And her voice and competitive spirit simply weren’t going to be silenced by unfamiliarity. 

“I just walked in and asked a few people if I could talk, and they said, ‘Yeah, go ahead.’ And then I got everybody’s attention,” Fuller said. “(I told them that) we need to cheer each other on because that’s the only way I’ve seen it work.

“I just used my goalkeeper voice in the (football) locker room.”

SARAH FULLER: 5 things to know about the Vanderbilt kicker, women’s soccer goalie

The halftime speech didn’t work. Vanderbilt lost 41-0 in Columbia, Missouri. But Fuller made an impression on the Commodores and, well, countless people from civil rights icon Billie Jean King to soccer superstar Carli Lloyd to Tennessee Sen. Marsha Blackburn.

But more than just women paid attention. Before the game, Missouri coach Eliah Drinkwitz, who has four daughters, whispered to the opposing kicker that he thought her participation was incredible.

“Girl dads have come up to me and said, ‘You are inspiring my girls. I want them to know they can do anything, and you are proving that point,’” Fuller said. “That’s the coolest thing.”

Derek Mason wanted best kicker, not just a social statement

So why did Vanderbilt coach Derek Mason add Fuller to the team?

He said it wasn’t a publicity stunt. It was out of necessity. Fuller’s strong leg and availability made her the best option for a team that lost its other kickers due to COVID-19 contact tracing.

But Mason, who has two daughters, didn’t miss the significance of Fuller’s feat.

“There are moments in time that no one can really forecast,” Mason said. “I think there was something bigger at work here.”

Fuller finally took the field, wearing No. 32 with “Play Like a Girl” on the back of her helmet. She broke the barrier by squibbing the

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