The College-Entrance Exam Is 9 Hours Long. Covid-19 Made It Harder.

SEOUL, South Korea — Nearly a half-million South Korean high school seniors hunkered down on Thursday to take an annual university-entrance exam they had been preparing for since kindergarten — a nine-hour marathon of tests that could decide their futures.

But this year, the government had to ensure the exam did not become a super-spreader event for the coronavirus.

For days, health officials in full protective gear had repeatedly disinfected 31,000 classrooms where the exam was to take place.

All students had to get their temperature taken before entering the classrooms. They sat at desks separated by plastic dividers and wore masks throughout the test.

Government-run health clinics stayed overnight to test students and screen anyone infected with the virus at the last minute. Those with a fever or sore throat were escorted to separate rooms to take their exams. At least one student showed up in full protective gear for fear of catching the coronavirus.

“I came early because I feared that I might be caught in a traffic jam,” another student, Kim Mun-jeong, told the cable channel JTBC. “I also wanted to check into the test-taking room sooner than other students to get myself familiarized with it and gain composure.”

In this education-obsessed country, it’s hard to overestimate the importance of the College Scholastic Ability Tests, or suneung, in the life of a South Korean student.

Most universities select their students based largely on the test scores of the single standardized year-end exam. Diplomas from a few top universities like Seoul National can make a huge difference when applying for jobs and promotions. Many students who fail to enter the universities they covet take the tests again and again in the following years, often living and studying in institutes with militarylike discipline.

Exam day is also a day when the country collectively wrings its hands and much of life is put on pause.

All banks, businesses and government offices delayed opening their doors by an hour to lessen road traffic. All planes were grounded and all military guns silenced for half an hour for fear they might interrupt students focused on an English listening-comprehension test. In the Jogyesa Buddhist temple in Central Seoul, parents lit candles and burned incense as they prayed for the success of their children taking the exam.

The pandemic has added new twists and an extra layer of anxiety and suspense to the grueling test. South Korea is grappling with a third wave of coronavirus infections, with health officials reporting some of the highest daily caseloads the country has seen. In the past week, the country has reported 438 to 581 new cases per day, including 540 on Thursday.

“Exam-takers and their parents, who have been supporting them, have had a tougher time this year than ever because of Covid-19,” said Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun, referring to how the pandemic has upended school life. “We must do everything we can to make sure that the students take their exam safely, and prepare for any

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So long, jazzoids. After nearly 30 years, KNKX’s Dick Stein calls it a career

Dick Stein finally felt comfortable telling the story — the real story.

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At long last, he was ready to come clean.

“Maybe since we’re doing, ‘now it can be told,’ I can tell you the truth,” Stein said by phone, on the first day of what would be his last week as a jazz DJ and host on KNKX.

“I never knew anyone named Jeannine. I never dated anybody named Jeannine,” Stein went on to admit.

“I just like the song.”

It was one of several revelations divulged Monday, during a wide-ranging conversation that clearly made Stein more uncomfortable than listeners are accustomed to.

After spending the better part of three decades on the air at KPLU and later KNKX, including weaving numerous colorful tales to explain his well-known affinity for the jazz standard “Jeannine,” it turns out that the 75-year-old local radio personality had no idea that his imminent retirement would strike such a chord.

Stein said the reaction to the news — which was announced in a short personal note he penned for KNKX last week — left him “overwhelmed,” and, for once, searching for the right words.

“To be honest, I really didn’t expect all of this. I didn’t think it would be that big of a deal,” Stein told The News Tribune, downplaying the situation with self-effacement and humility.

“I was really just moved by it,” Stein said.

While the prospect of a career twilight tribute might make Stein squirm, it should come as no surprise that news of his retirement has reverberated across the South Sound

Having begun his career as a jazz DJ at KPLU in the early 1990s, Stein’s unique voice and offbeat sense of humor — which seem specifically designed for dry one-liners — have become staples for public radio listeners in the area.

Whether you’re a fan of his favored music or not, Stein’s familiar “Hi ho, Jazzoids!” sign on and his descriptions of the “Big Red Switch” in the studio — which back in the original KPLU days was essentially a reset button that would erase the station’s software — were long ago woven into the local cultural fabric.

So, too, was Stein’s predictable playing of a rendition of “Jeannine” every Friday.

By speakerphone from his Tacoma home on Monday, Stein said it was simply time to hang it up.

If that meant dispelling the mystery of Jeannine after all these years — and putting an end to the playful speculation and innuendo he cultivated behind the microphone, which typically revolved around fabricated romantic encounters from his younger days — so be it.

“I’m no spring chicken. I’ve been doing this for a long time,” Stein said of his decision to call it a career.

“I don’t know what I’m going to do,” he added with a chuckle. “It just seemed like it was time to retire. I’m pretty old.”

Stein’s career playing jazz for local listeners actually marked his second foray into radio.

Originally from New York,

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A Long March To The Moon And Beyond

China’s landing this week of a probe on the Moon — the first attempt by any nation to retrieve lunar samples in four decades — underlined just how far the country has come in achieving its space dream.

Beijing has poured billions into its military-run space programme, with hopes of having a crewed space station by 2022 and of eventually sending humans to the Moon.

China has come a long way in its race to catch up with the United States and Russia, whose astronauts and cosmonauts have had decades of experience in space exploration.

Beijing sees its space project as a marker of its rising global stature and growing technological might.

Here is a look at China’s space programme through the decades, and where it is headed:

The Jade Rabbit lunar rover surveyed the moon's surface for 31 months The Jade Rabbit lunar rover surveyed the moon’s surface for 31 months Photo: CCTV / CCTV

Soon after the Soviet Union launched Sputnik in 1957, Chairman Mao Zedong pronounced: “We too will make satellites.”

It took more than a decade, but in 1970, China’s launched its first satellite on a Long March rocket.

Human spaceflight took decades longer, with Yang Liwei becoming the first Chinese “taikonaut” in 2003.

As the launch approached, concerns over the viability of the mission caused Beijing to cancel a live television broadcast at the last minute.

China has been carrying out experiments in a lab simulating a lunar-like environment in preparation for its long-term goal of putting humans on the moon China has been carrying out experiments in a lab simulating a lunar-like environment in preparation for its long-term goal of putting humans on the moon Photo: AFP / STR

But the launch went smoothly, with Yang orbiting the Earth 14 times during his 21-hour flight aboard the Shenzhou 5.

China launched five crewed missions after that.

Following in the footsteps of the United States and Russia, China is striving to build a space station circling our planet.

The launch of a rocket carrying China's Chang'e-5 lunar probe underlines how much progress Beijing has made towards its 'space dream' The launch of a rocket carrying China’s Chang’e-5 lunar probe underlines how much progress Beijing has made towards its ‘space dream’ Photo: AFP / STR

The Tiangong-1 lab was launched in September 2011.

In 2013, the second Chinese woman in space, Wang Yaping, gave a video class from inside the space module to children across the world’s most populous country.

The craft was also used for medical experiments and, most importantly, tests intended to prepare for the construction of a space station.

The lab was followed by the “Jade Rabbit” lunar rover in 2013, which first appeared a dud when it turned dormant and stopped sending signals back to Earth.

It made a dramatic recovery, though, ultimately surveying the Moon’s surface for 31 months, well beyond its expected lifespan.

In 2016, China launched its second orbital lab, the Tiangong-2, into orbit 393 kilometres (244 miles) above Earth. Taikonauts who have visited the station have run experiments on growing rice and other plants, as well as docking spacecraft.

China was deliberately left out of the International Space Station effort, but now it is expected to begin assembly of its own orbital outpost this year, with crews to start using it around 2022.

Under President Xi

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Broncos’ Brandon McManus: Sets career long

McManus converted his lone field-goal attempt, a 58-yarder, during Sunday’s 31-3 loss to New Orleans.

The Broncos took a five-yard loss on third down midway through the third quarter on Sunday, pushing a tough field-goal try back even further. McManus nailed it with room to spare, breaking his previous career long of 57 yards set back in 2015 and keeping alive Denver’s streak of never being shut out at home. Sunday was obviously a unique situation with an undrafted rookie wide receiver forced to play quarterback. Expect a few more opportunities for McManus Sunday night with Drew Lock back in the fold. In Week 7 against Kansas City, McManus converted a 43-yard field goal and one of two point-after attempts, just his second point-after miss since Week 3 of the 2016 season.

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Hubble’s Beautiful Pictures and the Long View

Hubble, the most powerful telescope in orbit, is still producing dazzling observations of targets near and far, from the familiar planets of our solar system to the mysterious suns of other worlds. The mission might be one of the easiest scientific endeavors to maintain in the middle of a plague. When I visited Hubble’s mission-operations center in Maryland last December, only one person sat inside the control room, all the staff that was needed to manage the mostly automated telescope—and, it would turn out three months later, when the state reported its first COVID-19 case, the right number to avoid tangling with a virus that thrived in close quarters.

A region of cosmic gas and dust (Herbig-Haro Jet HH 24) (NASA / ESA)

Hubble has quite a clear view of the universe from its perch in orbit, away from the atmosphere that warps and blocks cosmic light from beyond. Its images are, to use a very nonscientific word, pretty. You don’t have to be an astronomer, or to know that the galaxy you’re gazing at is called NGC 2525, in order to appreciate them. These images can serve as momentary distractions, small bursts of wonder, and they might even be good for the mind. At a time when the coronavirus has shrunk down so many people’s worlds, Hubble can still provide a long view—a glimpse of places that exist beyond ourselves.

Imagine yourself at a scenic vista somewhere on Earth, such as the rim of the Grand Canyon or the shore of an ocean stretching out past the horizon line. As your brain processes the view and its sheer vastness, feelings of awe kick in. Looking at a photo is not the same, but we might get a dose of that when we look at a particularly sparkly Hubble picture of a star cluster. The experience of awe, whether we’re standing at the summit of a mountain or sitting in front of a computer screen, can lead to “a diminished sense of self,” a phrase psychologists use to describe feelings of smallness or insignificance in the face of something larger than oneself. Alarming as that may sound, research has shown that the sensation can be a good thing: A shot of awe can boost feelings of connectedness with other people.

Jupiter and Saturn (NASA / ESA)

“Some people do have the sense when they’re looking across millions of light-years, that our ups and downs are ultimately meaningless on that scale,” says David Yaden, a research scientist in psychopharmacology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and who has studied self-transcendent experiences, including in astronauts. “But I think [space images] can also draw our attention to the preciousness of local meaning—our loved ones, people close to us, this Earth. It’s not a leap that I think always occurs, but I think the benefits flow to people who do make that leap.”

The experience is like a miniature version of the “overview effect,” the mental shift that many astronauts have experienced after

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Long Beach State vs. UCLA odds, line: 2020 college basketball picks, Nov. 30 predictions from proven model

The Long Beach State 49ers will take on the No. 22 UCLA Bruins at 9:30 p.m. ET on Monday at Pauley Pavilion. UCLA is 1-1 on the season, while Long Beach State is set to make its season debut on Monday night. The Bruins have dominated the 49ers over the years, winning each of the last nine meetings against Long Beach State. 

The Bruins are favored by 17.5-points in the latest UCLA vs. Long Beach State odds from William Hill Sportsbook, and the over-under is set at 142.5. Before entering any Long Beach State vs. UCLA picks, you’ll want to see the college basketball predictions from the advanced computer model at SportsLine.

The SportsLine Projection Model simulates every Division I college basketball game 10,000 times. Over the past four years, the proprietary computer model has generated an impressive profit of $2,400 for $100 players on its top-rated college basketball picks against the spread. Anyone who has followed it has seen huge returns.

Now, the model has set its sights on UCLA vs. Long Beach State. You can head to SportsLine to see its picks. Here are several college basketball odds for UCLA vs. Long Beach State:

  • UCLA vs. Long Beach State spread: UCLA -17.5
  • UCLA vs. Long Beach State over-under: 142.5 points
  • UCLA vs. Long Beach State money line: UCLA -2800, Long Beach State +1200

What you need to know about UCLA

The Bruins were 19-12 last season and are coming off of a 107-98 win against the Pepperdine Waves this past Friday. It may have taken overtime, but UCLA eventually got the job done against Pepperdine. The Bruins were led by guard Chris Smith, who finished with 26 points, 12 rebounds and six assists. Smith is averaging 18.0 points, six rebounds and 4.5 assists per game through his first two outings of the season. 

UCLA will enter Monday’s matchup confident it can secure a big win. That’s because the Bruins are 7-0 in their last seven home games. In addition, UCLA is 6-3 against the spread in its last nine games against an opponent from the Big West conference. 

What you need to know about Long Beach State

Long Beach State struggled last year, ending up 11-21. However, the 49ers bring back a lot of talent this year, including the dynamic duo of Chance Hunter and Michael Carter III. 

Hunter finished the 2019-20 season averaging 13.9 points and 5.0 rebounds per game. Smith was also lethal from behind the arc last season, knocking down over 41 percent of his three-point attempts. Carter, meanwhile, averaged over 12 points per game last season and made 81.2 percent of his shots from the charity stripe. 

How to make UCLA vs. Long Beach State picks

The model has simulated UCLA vs. Long Beach State 10,000 times and the results are in. We can tell you that the model is leaning over, and it’s also generated a point-spread pick that is hitting in well over 60 percent of simulations. You can only see the

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One Colorado Business Owner Partners with a Houston University to Help Harris County Seniors Endure Long Lines at the Polls.

(Denver, Colorado) – With only a day until the 2020 U.S. presidential election, voters in Harris County, Texas are clamoring to the polls, many waiting hours in line to cast their vote. After watching what was happening on the news, Colorado business owner Jim Burness wanted to help.  

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“We weren’t sure how we could make a difference, but we knew we had to try,” Burness shared and after a few hours of brainstorming, he had an idea. “We knew lots of companies would be sending water and offering food, but I wanted to find another way to keep people in line. I was most concerned about seniors and those with health issues, so we packed up a bunch of camp chairs and shipped them to Texas.”  

In fact, it was more than “a bunch”. Mr. Burness and his wife cleaned out their local Walmart and shipped a huge pallet of camp chairs to Texas. Unable to travel and distribute the chairs himself, he decided to reach out to the Rice University Young Democrats for help.

In fact, it was more than “a bunch”. Mr. Burness and his wife cleaned out their local Walmart and shipped a huge pallet of camp chairs to Texas. Unable to travel and distribute the chairs himself, he decided to reach out to the Rice University Young Democrats for help.

“We were blown away by the gesture and definitely wanted to find a way to make this happen,” Alissa Kono shared, a junior studying social policy analysis at Rice and President of the university’s Young Democrats. The group, who’s actively engaged in getting the vote out on campus, has also been phone banking and actively reaching out to the community to ensure everyone gets to the polls and is up to date on the issues. “This election is too important not to vote, but even beyond that voting is a huge responsibility and privilege, and everyone needs to get out there and exercise their voice.”  

“We’re fortunate in Colorado, because everyone receives a ballot in the mail. But in Texas that’s not the case,” Burness shared. “When I was contemplating how I could best support the election, I kept thinking of my dad. There is no way he could have ever stood in line for an hour let alone five. My hope is that this small gift will allow others like him to have their voice heard, no matter if they are voting red or blue.”

Nearly 1.4 million Houston area residents have already cast their ballots in early voting, exceeding the number that turned out for the 2016 election. This surge, without question, is a response to the presidential race, but also related to the challenges Harris County voters found in 2016. Even though they continue to see long lines, Harris County officials have done everything in their power to make voting more accessible by expanding voting hours and tripling the number of voting locations, the lines continue to be long. While local officials actively want to ensure their constituents are able to vote, the newly blue county leadership, also recognized the nation’s third largest county with record breaking turnout could play a pivotal role in the election – potentially, tipping Texas for Biden. 

While Mr. Burness is an active Colorado Democrat, he’s equally a strong believer in exercising your right to vote – so much so, he is closing his offices on November 3rd. “I made the decision to make Election Day a staff holiday, not only because I wanted to give everyone the opportunity to vote, but also because so many wanted to get involved as poll watchers, dropping off ballots for the elderly or making phone calls,” he shared. “Do I want to see Biden victory? Absolutely, but regardless of party, no

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Long before it was a university or plantation, Clemson’s campus was home to the Cherokee

Before it was a university, it was a plantation. And before it was a plantation, it was a nation.



a sign on the side of a building: Hopewell Plantation, home of Revolutionary War General Andrew Pickens in Clemson. The Federal Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1785-1795) was also a U.S. Congressman (1793-1795) and negotiated the Hopewell treaties that "established peace and friendship with the Cherokee, Choclaw, and Chickasaw tribes," according to an on-site marker made for the S.C. Heritage Corridor.


© Ken Ruinard / staff
Hopewell Plantation, home of Revolutionary War General Andrew Pickens in Clemson. The Federal Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1785-1795) was also a U.S. Congressman (1793-1795) and negotiated the Hopewell treaties that “established peace and friendship with the Cherokee, Choclaw, and Chickasaw tribes,” according to an on-site marker made for the S.C. Heritage Corridor.

No one knows exactly when the Cherokee tribe of Native Americans first inhabited the area now known as Pickens and Oconee counties, only that it happened sometime in the 1500s or 1600s, according to historians.

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Cherokee history in Clemson has long been known, if not often discussed, according to researchers at the university. But as the school seeks to explore its past and face the hard truths about Clemson’s historical legacy, a group of faculty and staff are trying to get the school to acknowledge the long relationship Native Americans have had with the land now consisting of Clemson’s campus. 

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Decolonization group seeks to honor past

University faculty and staff are trying to honor the Native American heritage on Clemson’s campus with Decolonize Clemson, a grassroots group that seeks to educate and raise awareness for the history and legacy of the Cherokee at Clemson. A few years ago, the university erected signage on Perimeter Road acknowledging the Native settlements that used to occupy the land, but activists want more. 

More: What you learned about the ‘first Thanksgiving’ isn’t true. Here’s the real story

The ultimate goal, according to Decolonize CU member Feeser, is to establish a relationship with the Eastern Band of Cherokee (located in Western NC) and to honor the people who lived and worked Clemson’s land long before anyone else did. 

“I think it’s hard for a lot of people to even remotely understand what it means that we occupied lands that really aren’t ours,” Feeser said. 

You can find Clemson University’s schedule of events for Native American Heritage Month online.

Pre-Revolution history

Called “lower towns” because they were in the piedmont of the Blue Ridge mountains, an estimated 500 people lived in the village of “Esseneca,” according to 18th Century reports from naturalist William Bertram. Although an exact site has not been found, Clemson professor Andrea Feeser said it’s likely the village was situated on the bank of the Seneca River, which is now buried under Lake Hartwell near the Walker Golf Course on the southwest side of campus. 



a man holding a frisbee: Josh Cafalano, a history professor at Clemson University is studying Native American history and the American Revolution at the site of at Fort Rutledge.


© Ken Ruinard / staff
Josh Cafalano, a history professor at Clemson University is studying Native American history and the American Revolution at the site of at Fort Rutledge.

The area, which is now along the lake dikes, Calhoun Bottoms agriculture fields and the university’s wastewater treatment plant, would have been a densely populated area for the Cherokee, according to researchers. 

“All along the river,

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Farm bills to Farm Aid: A look back at Collin Peterson’s long career

Collin Peterson will end his career as one of Minnesota’s longest-serving members of Congress, having spent 30 years in Washington, D.C. In that time, he developed a reputation for bipartisanship and independence.

He is one of the last rural Democrats in Congress, and frequently bucked his party on issues such as the environment and creating the Affordable Care Act. When he breaks with his party, he says he is merely reflecting the views of his district. Peterson was one of only two Democrats to vote against the impeachment of President Donald Trump. He opposes abortion and is the lone Democrat in Congress with an A-rating from the NRA. Peterson is the first Minnesotan to serve as chairman of the powerful House Agriculture Committee, highlighting his deep understanding of rural issues and international agricultural policy.

Peterson’s seat was a loss for congressional Democrats who hoped a “blue wave” would help expand their vote margin in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2020 – an expectation that didn’t materialize.

Peterson often flies a single-engine airplane to get around his district, which stretches roughly 35,000 square miles across much of the western border of the state.

Sen. Collin Peterson explains proposed bill to a crowd. Photo by Art Hager.

Nov. 2, 1976

Peterson is elected to the Minnesota Senate. Peterson works as an accountant when he is elected, and serves in the state Senate for 10 years. Peterson had also previously served in the North Dakota National Guard.

Photo by Art Hager.

1984

Peterson runs for the U.S. House of Representatives in Minnesota’s 7th Congressional District, which includes Moorhead and Bemidji. He loses to Republican Arlan Stangeland.

1986

Peterson runs again for the House of Representatives, losing to Stangeland again, this time by only 121 votes.

Peterson makes another attempt in 1988 but loses in the DFL primary.

Peterson speaks to students at his former high school in Glyndon after winning the election in 1990. Photo by Associated Press.

1990

After three failed attempts, Peterson is successfully elected to serve in the U.S. House. He defeats incumbent Stangeland.

Peterson goes on to represent Minnesota’s 7th Congressional District for 30 years.

Peterson leads a five-man congressional band called The Second Amendments at WE Fest in 2005. Photo by Don Davis.

2005

Country music star Willie Nelson invites Peterson to play at Farm Aid to lend political heft to the fundraiser. Peterson played in several bands in Washington, including a cover band called the Second Amendments.

“He told me I could play as long as I wanted, but I know how that goes,” Peterson said at the time. “He’s kind of like a member of Congress telling a constituent what they want to hear.”

Peterson visited his district to attend the McLeod County Fair. Photo by Jeff Wheeler.

2007

Peterson serves as chairman of the House Agriculture Committe for four years. During his tenure, the historic 2008 Farm Bill is passed and signed into law.

2010

Peterson is one of 34 Democrats to vote against

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A Long March To The Moon

China’s launch this week of an unmanned spacecraft aimed at bringing back lunar rocks — the first attempt by any nation to retrieve samples from the Moon in four decades — underlines just how far the country has come in achieving its “space dream”.

Beijing has poured billions into its military-run space programme, with hopes of having a crewed space station by 2022 and of eventually sending humans to the Moon.

China has come a long way in its race to catch up with the United States and Russia, whose astronauts and cosmonauts have had decades of experience in space exploration.

Beijing sees its military-run space programme as a marker of its rising global stature and growing technological might.

Here is a look at China’s space programme through the decades, and where it is headed:

The Jade Rabbit lunar rover surveyed the moon's surface for 31 months The Jade Rabbit lunar rover surveyed the moon’s surface for 31 months Photo: CCTV / CCTV

Soon after the Soviet Union launched Sputnik in 1957, Chairman Mao Zedong pronounced “we too will make satellites.”

It took more than a decade, but in 1970, China’s first satellite lifted into space on the back of a Long March rocket.

Human space flight took decades longer, with Yang Liwei becoming China’s first astronaut to go into space in 2003.

As the launch approached, concerns over the viability of the mission caused Beijing to cancel a nationwide live television broadcast at the last minute.

China has been carrying out experiments in a lab simulating a lunar-like environment in preparation for its long-term goal of putting humans on the moon China has been carrying out experiments in a lab simulating a lunar-like environment in preparation for its long-term goal of putting humans on the moon Photo: AFP / STR

Despite the fears, the launch went off smoothly, with Yang orbiting the Earth 14 times during his 21-hour flight aboard the Shenzhou 5.

Since then, China has sent men and women into space with increasing regularity.

Following in the footsteps of the United States and Russia, China is striving to open a space station circling our planet.

The Tiangong-1 was shot into orbit in September 2011.

The launch of a rocket carrying China's Chang'e-5 lunar probe underlines how much progress Beijing has made towards its 'space dream' The launch of a rocket carrying China’s Chang’e-5 lunar probe underlines how much progress Beijing has made towards its ‘space dream’ Photo: AFP / STR

In 2013, the second Chinese woman in space, Wang Yaping, gave a video class from inside the space module beamed back to children across the world’s most populous country.

The lab was also used for medical experiments and, most importantly, tests intended to prepare for the building of a space station.

The lab was followed by the “Jade Rabbit” lunar rover in 2013, which looked at first like a dud when it turned dormant and stopped sending signals back to Earth.

The rover made a dramatic recovery, though, ultimately surveying the Moon’s surface for 31 months, well beyond its expected lifespan.

In 2016, China launched its second station, the Tiangong-2 lab into orbit 393 kilometres (244 miles) above Earth, in what analysts say will likely serve as a final building block before China launches a manned space station.

Astronauts who have visited the station have

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