AJ Dillon has COVID-19: Green Bay Packers place Boston College alum on reserve list

Former Boston College running back AJ Dillon has tested positive for COVID-19 and will miss the Green Back Packers’ Thursday night game against the San Francisco 49ers.

According to ESPN’s Rob Demovsky, Dillon is on the COVID-19 reserve list, but the game is still expected to be played as initially scheduled. He posted:

“Packers coach Matt LaFleur, wearing a mask in his press conference after AJ Dillon’s positive COVID test: “We are preparing to play on Thursday and if they tell us otherwise, we’ll adjust.” When asked whether tracing has determined any close contacts on the team, he said: “As far I know right now we are full speed ahead” while also noting it’s a fluid situation.”

Dillon, a 22-year-old rookie, has 23 carries for 97 yards so far this season.

The BC running back from New London, Connecticut was drafted by the Green Bay Packers, in the second round, 62nd overall in April. Dillon turned pro after rewriting the football record books in Chestnut Hill despite playing just three seasons at Boston College. He was the sixth running back selected.

Dillon was the BC offense for the past three years with 845 carries for a school-record 4,382 yards and 38 touchdowns in three seasons. At 6-feet-0, 247-pounds, he’s a physical grinding back.

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AJ Dillon to NFL Draft 2020: Boston College’s all-time rushing leader turning pro, will skip bowl game

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MPS department heads share expansive list of needs to improve system’s education quality

With proper funding, there could be fewer students per class and more small-group instruction. There could be trauma-informed schools, where everyone in the building knew how to recognize when a student showed signs they needed help. There could be air conditioned auditoriums and walls without falling plaster. There could even be Korean classes.

MPS Superintendent Dr. Ann Moore discusses how the proposed property tax increase could help Montgomery Public Schools.

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Bernard Mitchell carries signs as Montgomery Public Schools leadership as well as educators and staff from across the school district canvass neighborhoods in Montgomery, Ala., on Sunday October 25, 2020 meeting with voters and asking for support of Amendment 382.


© Mickey Welsh / Advertiser
Bernard Mitchell carries signs as Montgomery Public Schools leadership as well as educators and staff from across the school district canvass neighborhoods in Montgomery, Ala., on Sunday October 25, 2020 meeting with voters and asking for support of Amendment 382.

Montgomery Public Schools’ department heads explained their list of needs to the Advertiser that they believe will improve the educational experiences for the district’s nearly 28,000 students. The system’s needs are massive, and necessary, they said.

Each explained their goals are almost entirely dependent upon the proposed property tax increase voters will consider on Election Day.

They fear that little will improve without the funding — about $33 million annually which will help the district secure a capital improvement bond and fund a lengthy list of additional offerings and resources. 

When Superintendent Ann Roy Moore first arrived in Montgomery, she set up visits to the schools and was surprised by the level of decay she saw. At that time — nearly three years ago — Moore was retired and anticipated she’d only spend about six months helping the district as the board searched for a permanent leader. 

That plan did not happen. Instead, she has dedicated herself to helping move the school system forward, despite the many hurdles she has faced.  And despite not initially being aware of the district’s low level of local funding, Moore said serving MPS has been a blessing. 

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