Global Stem Cell Therapy Market | Limited Number of FDA Approved Therapies to Be a Key Trend

The stem cell therapy market is poised to grow by USD 588.22 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of almost 7% during the forecast period.

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Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Stem Cell Therapy Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire).

Technavio suggests three forecast scenarios (optimistic, probable, and pessimistic) considering the impact of COVID-19. Download Free Sample Report on COVID-19 Recovery Analysis

The report on the stem cell therapy market provides a holistic update, market size and forecast, trends, growth drivers, and challenges, as well as vendor analysis.

The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current global market scenario, the latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The market is driven by an increase in awareness of stem cell therapy.

The stem cell therapy market analysis includes type and geography landscape. This study identifies the limited number of FDA-approved stem cell therapies as one of the prime reasons driving the stem cell therapy market growth during the next few years.

This report presents a detailed picture of the market by the way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources by an analysis of key parameters

The Stem Cell Therapy Market covers the following areas:

Stem Cell Therapy Market Sizing

Stem Cell Therapy Market Forecast

Stem Cell Therapy Market Analysis

Companies Mentioned

  • Gilead Sciences Inc.

  • Holostem Terapie Avanzate Srl

  • Lineage Cell Therapeutics Inc.

  • Lonza Group Ltd.

  • Novartis AG

  • Nuvasive Inc.

  • Organogenesis Inc.

  • Osiris Therapeutics Inc.

  • RTI Surgical Holdings Inc.

  • Vericel Corp. 

Key Topics Covered:

Executive Summary

Market Landscape

  • Market ecosystem

  • Market characteristics

  • Value chain analysis

Market Sizing

Five Forces Analysis

Market Segmentation by Type

  • Market segments

  • Comparison by Type

  • Allogeneic transplants – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Autologous transplants – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Market opportunity by Type

Customer landscape

Geographic Landscape

  • Geographic segmentation

  • Geographic comparison

  • North America – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Europe – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • APAC – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • South America – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • MEA – Market size and forecast 2019-2024

  • Key leading countries

  • Market opportunity by geography

  • Market drivers

  • Market challenges

  • Market trends

Vendor Landscape

  • Vendor landscape

  • Landscape disruption

Vendor Analysis

  • Vendors covered

  • Market positioning of vendors

  • Gilead Sciences Inc.

  • Holostem Terapie Avanzate Srl

  • Lineage Cell Therapeutics Inc.

  • Lonza Group Ltd.

  • Novartis AG

  • Nuvasive Inc.

  • Organogenesis Inc.

  • Osiris Therapeutics Inc.

  • RTI Surgical Holdings Inc.

  • Vericel Corp.

Appendix

About Us

Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. Their research and analysis focuses on emerging market trends and provides actionable insights to help businesses identify market opportunities and develop effective strategies to optimize their market positions. With over 500 specialized analysts, Technavio’s report library consists of more than 17,000 reports and counting, covering 800 technologies, spanning across 50 countries. Their client base consists of enterprises of all sizes, including more than 100 Fortune 500 companies. This growing client base relies on Technavio’s comprehensive

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Lunar water discovery may have limited effect on NASA exploration plans

WASHINGTON — Water ice may be more prevalent on the surface of the moon that previously thought, but that discovery appears unlikely to have any near-term effect on NASA’s lunar exploration plans.

In a paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy Oct. 26, scientists reported detecting traces of water in the crater Clavius on the near side of the moon using NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. SOFIA detected an infrared emission feature at a wavelength of 6 microns consistent with water on the surface in the vicinity of the crater.

The detection is not the first time that water has been seen on the moon. Over the last quarter-century, scientists have built up evidence, primarily from spacecraft missions, that water ice exists on the moon. That included the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission in 2009 that detected water in a plume of material created when a Centaur upper stage impacted the south polar region of the moon.

Those previous studies, though, have focused on the polar regions, which have permanently shadowed regions that serve as “cold traps” where ice is stable for extended periods. Clavius, by contrast, has no such shadowed regions, and is in direct sunlight for the two-week lunar day.

“The expectation is that any water present on a sunlit surface of the moon would not survive the lunar day,” said Paul Hertz, director of NASA’s astrophysics division, in a call with reporters. “This discovery reveals that water might be distributed across the lunar surface and not be limited to the cold shadowed places near the lunar poles.”

Scientists involved in the discovery don’t know for certain how the water got there. “It could be either from the solar wind or micrometeorites,” said Casey Honniball of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, who led the study.

It likely survives there because it is trapped in glass beads created in micrometeoroid impacts. “These glass beads are about the size of a pencil tip and protect the water from the harsh lunar environment,” she said.

The discovery has implications for both lunar science and future exploration. NASA has emphasized the importance of water ice as a means of making human exploration of the moon sustainable. That water could be a resource to both sustain astronauts and be converted into liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants for spacecraft.

With water thought to exist only at the poles, NASA has concentrated its lunar exploration activities there. The south pole of the moon remains the preferred landing site for the first Artemis crewed landing, Artemis 3, despite comments by NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine in September that suggested he was open to landing elsewhere on the moon. He subsequently stated that the south pole is still the primary landing area.

Water elsewhere on the moon could create new opportunities for human lunar missions beyond the polar regions. One challenge, though, is the tiny amount of water available: the concentrations detected by SOFIA are the equivalent of a 355-milliliter bottle

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The pool of Black talent in America is not ‘limited’ at all (opinion)

The CEO of Wells Fargo recently wrote a company memo to employees blaming the lack of diversity in their ranks on “a very limited pool of Black talent to recruit from.” While he subsequently cited unconscious bias, clarified his remarks and apologized, his comment serves as a teachable moment for all those interested in creating lasting, positive change in this moment of racial reckoning.



a man standing in front of a window: Dr. Wayne Frederick is President of Howard University. Moving forward the university is investing in and putting additional emphasis on its research capacity. He's pictured in the brand new Interdisciplinary Research Building on Georgia Avenue. Founded in 1867, Howard University is one of the elite HBCU's in the country, but revenue and administration problems plague the instititution and threaten its status. (Photo by Andre Chung for The Washington Post via Getty Images)


© Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images
Dr. Wayne Frederick is President of Howard University. Moving forward the university is investing in and putting additional emphasis on its research capacity. He’s pictured in the brand new Interdisciplinary Research Building on Georgia Avenue. Founded in 1867, Howard University is one of the elite HBCU’s in the country, but revenue and administration problems plague the instititution and threaten its status. (Photo by Andre Chung for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Wells Fargo’s CEO verbalized what is often whispered in many corporate hallways. But let me be clear: There is no shortage of Black talent in the United States.

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As president of Howard University, I have a unique window into the African-American students within my own institution, fellow historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and other centers of higher education across the country. The talent I see every day is immense and inspiring. Black students and alumni have a depth of capabilities and diverse passions and ambitions. They leave our campuses eager to work hard and ready to change our industries, our society and our world for the better. All they need is an opportunity.

Our nation’s ongoing struggle with the question of race is intimately tied to the origins of the institutions of higher learning organized to educate Black Americans. Beginning with the Institute for Colored Youth (now Cheyney University) in 1837, more than 100 diverse institutions of higher education now exist under the federal designation of “historically Black colleges and universities.”

In 1867, Congress chartered the institution I now lead, Howard University, in what I often call one of America’s great romances. The aftermath of a bloody civil war gave way to a congressional investment in providing education for newly emancipated people when President Andrew Johnson, an openly racist president — and the first to be impeached — signed our charter. The Morrill Acts passed by Congress facilitated the creation of Black land grant colleges.

Over the past 150 years, America’s HBCUs have consistently built a Black professional class despite the peaks and valleys of race relations over time. Despite chronic under-resourcing and commonly serving students who are not born into privilege, these institutions have contributed mightily to the fabric of our nation. Furthering our investments in HBCUs will serve to advance the economic opportunities of graduates from these institutions and for the Black community more generally.

Our colleges and universities represent only 3% of the higher education institutions yet produce almost 20% of bachelor’s degrees earned by African Americans and nearly a quarter of all bachelors earned by African Americans in STEM

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