Y’all must’ve forgot: Five legendary moments from Roy Jones Jr.’s boxing career ahead of the Mike Tyson fight

On Saturday night, two of the all-time great fighters in boxing history will step into the ring to face off in an exhibition fight when Roy Jones Jr. does battle with Mike Tyson. Few athletes in history have reached the heights of fame — and infamy — of Tyson. Despite Jones never reaching Tyson’s level of notoriety, it’s almost without question that Jones is the better fighter in a historic context.

Jones is the only fighter ever to start his career at junior middleweight and go on to win a heavyweight world championship. He won world titles along the way at middleweight, super middleweight and light heavyweight and was ultimately recognized by Ring Magazine as Fighter of the Decade for the 1990s.

Ahead of Jones’ clash with Tyson at Staples Center in Los Angeles, let’s take a look back at five of the most memorable fights of his storied career.

First world title win over Hopkins

On the undercard of the heavyweight title fight between Riddick Bowe and Jesse Ferguson on May 22, 1993, Jones entered the ring opposite fellow future all-time great Bernard Hopkins. The fight was for the IBF middleweight championship that had been vacated by James Toney. Jones and Hopkins wouldn’t produce a thriller in the bout, but Jones was sharp throughout the fight, piling up early rounds before Hopkins was able to establish a rhythm and start taking some rounds on the scorecards.

Ultimately, Jones outlanded Hopkins 206 to 153 and also landed at a higher percentage. Jones would take all three official scorecards 116-112, though both Sports Illustrated (117-111) and HBO unofficial scorer Herold Lederman (118-110) saw the fight as an even wider win for Jones, as he improved his career mark to 22-0. The two would go on to rematch in 2010 with Hopkins winning a wide decision over Jones, whose style was much less suited to late-career success than the rugged Hopkins.

Upset against James Toney

As previously mentioned, Toney held the IBF middleweight title before moving up to super middleweight and capturing the IBF title at 168 pounds. Toney entered the Nov. 18, 1994 fight with Jones with an undefeated 44-0-2 record and the No. 2 spot in the Ring Magazine pound-for-pound rankings. Jones was 26-0 and ranked No. 3 pound-for-pound.

Toney was the favorite coming into the fight, but Jones dominated the action from the jump, in part because Toney was not in the best shape of his career. The fight produced one of the most iconic moments of his career, with Jones posing like one of his fighting roosters, Toney trying to mimic him and Jones landing a leaping hook that sent Toney stumbling back into the corner for a knockdown. In the end, Jones won his second world title by taking the unanimous decision by scores of 119-108, 118-109, and 117-110.

Playing two pro sports in one day

Make no mistake about it, Eric Lucas had no business stepping in the ring with Jones when he challenged for Jones’

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Doc Emrick Reflects on Legendary Career and Ties to Pittsburgh

He called all three of Pittsburgh’s Stanley Cup championships in 2009, ’16 and ’17, along with the most magical moments of Sidney Crosby‘s career, like his Golden Goal at the 2010 Winter Olympics.

In addition to that, Emrick has a number of neat ties to the city of Pittsburgh. He began his career covering the Penguins in the 1970-71 season as a freelance reporter with the Beaver County Times while teaching at Geneva College, and of course, has been a passionate Pirates fan ever since he was a kid.

So after Emrick, 74, announced his retirement last month following a magnificent 50-year career, he received a number of messages from members of the Penguins organization. Mario Lemieux, Sidney Crosby and Kris Letang all sent texts, with Mike Sullivan even writing a short letter that he mailed to Emrick’s home in Michigan.

“He’s just had such a huge impact on the game,” Sullivan said. “As I said to him when I wrote him a short note, I can only share my personal experience, but Doc is part of the greatest moments of my professional career in witnessing an experience in the Stanley Cup runs, and Doc is the voice of those experiences. 

“And you know, he carries himself with such dignity and grace with how he interacts with coaches and players, and he has such a way above him to articulate the game in such a unique way. We’re all going to miss him. We’re all going to miss him around the rinks. He’s a pleasant person. And he’s had such a positive influence on the game.”

PittsburghPenguins.com took a trip down memory lane with Emrick to talk about his iconic career and those stops he made in the City of Champions along the way.

Tweet from @penguins: Our fondest memories.Our greatest feats.The moments we all remember.Doc Emrick immortalized them with his words.Congratulations to Mike ‘Doc’ Emrick on a legendary career. Thank you for being a part of Penguins history. #ThankYouDoc pic.twitter.com/ZmVUazil2K

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Emrick’s first connection with Pittsburgh actually came when he was a kid growing up in LaFontaine, Indiana in the 1950s. 

Although basketball has always been the most popular sport in that state, Emrick actually spent his childhood as a big baseball fan – with the Pittsburgh Pirates being his beloved team. That was all thanks to KDKA’s powerful radio signal, as Emrick was able to listen to Bob Prince call games on a nightly basis in the summer months. 

In his book Off Mike: How a Kid from Basketball-Crazy Indiana Became America’s NHL Voice (released the day after announcing his retirement!), Emrick describes how Prince and color analyst Jim Woods made baseball seem like a sport of wonder and romance, which got him hooked. That love was only intensified when the Pirates won the 1960 World Series thanks to Bill Mazeroski’s walk-off home run in Game 7 against the New York Yankees. 

All these years later, Emrick is still a loyal Pirates fan and has season

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Five legendary moments from Roy Jones Jr.’s boxing career ahead of the Mike Tyosn fight

On Saturday night, two of the all-time great fighters in boxing history will step into the ring to face off in an exhibition fight when Roy Jones Jr. does battle with Mike Tyson. Few athletes in history have reached the heights of fame — and infamy — of Tyson. Despite Jones never reaching Tyson’s level of notoriety, it’s almost without question that Jones is the better fighter in a historic context.



Roy Jones Jr. in a boxing ring


© Provided by CBS Sports


Jones is the only fighter ever to start his career at junior middleweight and go on to win a heavyweight world championship. He won world titles along the way at middleweight, super middleweight and light heavyweight and was ultimately recognized by Ring Magazine as Fighter of the Decade for the 1990s.

Ahead of Jones’ clash with Tyson at Staples Center in Los Angeles, let’s take a look back at five of the most memorable fights of his storied career.

First world title win over Hopkins

On the undercard of the heavyweight title fight between Riddick Bowe and Jesse Ferguson on May 22, 1993, Jones entered the ring opposite fellow future all-time great Bernard Hopkins. The fight was for the IBF middleweight championship that had been vacated by James Toney. Jones and Hopkins wouldn’t produce a thriller in the bout, but Jones was sharp throughout the fight, piling up early rounds before Hopkins was able to establish a rhythm and start taking some rounds on the scorecards.

Ultimately, Jones outlanded Hopkins 206 to 153 and also landed at a higher percentage. Jones would take all three official scorecards 116-112, though both Sports Illustrated (117-111) and HBO unofficial scorer Herold Lederman (118-110) saw the fight as an even wider win for Jones, as he improved his career mark to 22-0. The two would go on to rematch in 2010 with Hopkins winning a wide decision over Jones, whose style was much less suited to late-career success than the rugged Hopkins.

Upset against James Toney

As previously mentioned, Toney held the IBF middleweight title before moving up to super middleweight and capturing the IBF title at 168 pounds. Toney entered the Nov. 18, 1994 fight with Jones with an undefeated 44-0-2 record and the No. 2 spot in the Ring Magazine pound-for-pound rankings. Jones was 26-0 and ranked No. 3 pound-for-pound.

Toney was the favorite coming into the fight, but Jones dominated the action from the jump, in part because Toney was not in the best shape of his career. The fight produced one of the most iconic moments of his career, with Jones posing like one of his fighting roosters, Toney trying to mimic him and Jones landing a leaping hook that sent Toney stumbling back into the corner for a knockdown. In the end, Jones won his second world title by taking the unanimous decision by scores of 119-108, 118-109, and 117-110.

Playing two pro sports in one day

Make no mistake about it, Eric Lucas had no business stepping in the ring with Jones

Read more

Y’all must’ve forgot: Five legendary moments from Roy Jones Jr.’s boxing career ahead of the Mike Tyosn fight

On Saturday night, two of the all-time great fighters in boxing history will step into the ring to face off in an exhibition fight when Roy Jones Jr. does battle with Mike Tyson. Few athletes in history have reached the heights of fame — and infamy — of Tyson. Despite Jones never reaching Tyson’s level of notoriety, it’s almost without question that Jones is the better fighter in a historic context.

Jones is the only fighter ever to start his career at junior middleweight and go on to win a heavyweight world championship. He won world titles along the way at middleweight, super middleweight and light heavyweight and was ultimately recognized by Ring Magazine as Fighter of the Decade for the 1990s.

Ahead of Jones’ clash with Tyson at Staples Center in Los Angeles, let’s take a look back at five of the most memorable fights of his storied career.

First world title win over Hopkins

On the undercard of the heavyweight title fight between Riddick Bowe and Jesse Ferguson on May 22, 1993, Jones entered the ring opposite fellow future all-time great Bernard Hopkins. The fight was for the IBF middleweight championship that had been vacated by James Toney. Jones and Hopkins wouldn’t produce a thriller in the bout, but Jones was sharp throughout the fight, piling up early rounds before Hopkins was able to establish a rhythm and start taking some rounds on the scorecards.

Ultimately, Jones outlanded Hopkins 206 to 153 and also landed at a higher percentage. Jones would take all three official scorecards 116-112, though both Sports Illustrated (117-111) and HBO unofficial scorer Herold Lederman (118-110) saw the fight as an even wider win for Jones, as he improved his career mark to 22-0. The two would go on to rematch in 2010 with Hopkins winning a wide decision over Jones, whose style was much less suited to late-career success than the rugged Hopkins.

Upset against James Toney

As previously mentioned, Toney held the IBF middleweight title before moving up to super middleweight and capturing the IBF title at 168 pounds. Toney entered the Nov. 18, 1994 fight with Jones with an undefeated 44-0-2 record and the No. 2 spot in the Ring Magazine pound-for-pound rankings. Jones was 26-0 and ranked No. 3 pound-for-pound.

Toney was the favorite coming into the fight, but Jones dominated the action from the jump, in part because Toney was not in the best shape of his career. The fight produced one of the most iconic moments of his career, with Jones posing like one of his fighting roosters, Toney trying to mimic him and Jones landing a leaping hook that sent Toney stumbling back into the corner for a knockdown. In the end, Jones won his second world title by taking the unanimous decision by scores of 119-108, 118-109, and 117-110.

Playing two pro sports in one day

Make no mistake about it, Eric Lucas had no business stepping in the ring with Jones when he challenged for Jones’

Read more

‘Legendary’ University of Minnesota law professor C. Robert ‘Bob’ Morris dies at 92

Bob Morris loved nothing more than to mingle with his fellow University of Minnesota faculty and take promising law students under his wing.

Morris taught torts, property, corporations and business law for 36 years at the U’s law school. He dedicated his life to academia and treated those around him like family. He and his wife, Sandy, regularly attended faculty dinner parties and invited colleagues and students to their home. He also was a staunch advocate for his peers, representing faculty in tenure cases and advocating for the law school as a member of the U’s faculty senate.

Morris, a champion for fairness and equality, died peacefully Oct. 16. He was 92. In his late years, his health declined because of Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia.

“Bob just loved teaching. But he also loved being a part of the university community,” said Sandy Morris, his wife of 50 years. “That was a very, very important part of him.”

Born in 1928 in Denver as Clarence Robert Morris Jr., he was known by his friends and family as Bob and professionally as “C. Robert Morris.” Practicing law was in his blood — his father taught at the University of Wyoming law school and his paternal grandfather was a prominent Denver lawyer. His mother died when he was 14 months old.

After graduating from Yale University with a professional law degree, Morris served in the U.S. Air Force as an assistant staff judge advocate. He later spent 10 years teaching law at Rutgers University before joining the University of Minnesota law school in 1964.

Morris was recognized in his field, co-authoring three editions of “Cases and Materials on Corporations” and helping his father write a book on tort law, which covers most civil suits.

“He offered a lot of insights into what makes for good argument — how to structure it, how to think about it,” said retired U law professor Brad Clary, who was a student on the law school’s national moot court competition team when Morris was an adviser.

Morris taught Clary much about appellate advocacy and legal techniques. Clary said the mentorship set him up for future success; he went on to coach the U’s national moot court competition team and become a full-time law school professor teaching legal writing and appellate advocacy.

Morris also was an advocate for women entering law school. He often counseled older women who were pursuing higher education after raising children, Sandy Morris said. In a fall 2000 article announcing his retirement, Morris credited the prestige of the law school to the increasing number of women seeking law degrees.

A proud Golden Gopher, Morris spent much of his time with his peers. He chaired the university’s tenure committee as it began drafting the current tenure code. And he was a longtime member of a faculty dining club called “Gown in Town,” which he continued to meet with for a decade after his retirement.

“He will be remembered [as] a legendary professor in

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Anderson Silva retirement: Looking back at the five biggest moments from The Spider’s legendary career

This Saturday, in the main event of UFC Fight Night, Anderson Silva will fight for what he expects to be the final time in his legendary UFC career. Silva will face off with Uriah Hall at the UFC Apex facility in Las Vegas.

Silva has a strong argument as maybe the greatest fighter in the history of the sport, having won the UFC middleweight title and defended it successfully 10 times in one of the most dominant runs in MMA history. But what made Silva’s career truly special wasn’t simply that he won fights at the highest level, but the way he got the job done in the Octagon. From his first UFC fight against Chris Leben to his front-kick knockout of Vitor Belfort, Silva delivered plenty of iconic moments that established him as one of MMA’s all-time must-see fighters.

In honor of his upcoming fight, let’s take a look back at five of the greatest moments in the legendary career of Anderson Silva.

Debut vs. Chris Leben (June 28, 2006)

Silva entered the Octagon at UFC Fight Night 5 as a favorite at the betting window, but in a booming post-Ultimate Fighter UFC, Leben was the fan favorite. Silva was well-traveled, having fought in five different countries across four continents. Leben, meanwhile, had fought in five different states across two time zones. Still, Leben was highly regarded as a brawler and entered the Silva fight riding a six-fight winning streak, including five wins in the Octagon.

The moments before the fight were a strong contrast in personalities, with Leben looking as intense as you’d expect while Silva standing hands on hips looking bored. After the bell, the technical gulf between the fighters became immediately clear, with Silva shifting and working angles with long strikes, battering Leben and almost finishing him after a knockdown 34 seconds into the fight. Instead, the stoppage came on the second knockdown 13 seconds later. Dominating and finishing the ultra-tough Leben with ease was an immediate star-making performance for Silva.

KO of Rich Franklin for title (Oct. 14, 2006)

While Leben was the rugged brawler fans had gotten behind because of his stint as the emotionally broken kid on a reality show, Franklin was the UFC middleweight standard-bearer. Franklin had been so dominant in his UFC run — which included a light heavyweight win over Ken Shamrock — that he entered the Octagon a larger favorite against Silva (-225) than Silva had been against Leben (-200).

Franklin fought well in the opening moments, using leg kicks and straight punches. As the fight started to look like it may turn into a chess match on the feet, Silva reached forward and grabbed Franklin in a muay Thai clinch before unloading with knees to the body. Knee after knee landed and visibly took the fight out of Franklin before Silva moved the knees from the body to the head — a decision that was somehow merciful after the brutality of the body work. Less than three minutes

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