Killer electrons in strumming sky lights

Killer electrons in strumming sky lights
Low-energy (blue) and high-energy (yellow) electrons form during the process that generates the pulsating aurora. The high-energy ‘relativistic’ electrons could cause localized destruction of the ozone. Credit: PsA project

Computer simulations explain how electrons with wide-ranging energies rain into Earth’s upper and middle atmosphere during a phenomenon known as the pulsating aurora. The findings, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, suggest that the higher-energy electrons resulting from this process could cause destruction of the part of the ozone in the mesosphere, about 60 kilometers above Earth’s surface. The study was a collaboration between scientists in Japan, including at Nagoya University, and colleagues in the US, including from NASA.


The northern and southern lights that people are typically aware of, called the aurora borealis and australis, look like colored curtains of reds, greens, and purples spreading across the night skies. But there is another kind of aurora that is less frequently seen. The pulsating aurora looks more like indistinct wisps of cloud strumming across the sky.

Scientists have only recently developed the technologies enabling them to understand how the pulsating aurora forms. Now, an international research team, led by Yoshizumi Miyoshi of Nagoya University’s Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, has developed a theory to explain the wide-energy electron precipitations of pulsating auroras and conducted computer simulations that validate their theory.

Their findings suggest that both low- and high-energy electrons originate simultaneously from interactions between chorus waves and electrons in the Earth’s magnetosphere.

Chorus waves are plasma waves generated near the magnetic equator. Once formed, they travel northwards and southwards, interacting with electrons in Earth’s magnetosphere. This interaction energizes the electrons, scattering them down into the upper atmosphere, where they release the light energy that appears as a pulsating aurora.

The electrons that result from these interactions range from lower-energy ones, of only a few hundred kiloelectron volts, to very high-energy ones, of several thousand kiloelectron volts, or ‘megaelectron’ volts.

Miyoshi and his team suggest that the high-energy electrons of pulsating auroras are ‘relativistic’ electrons, otherwise known as killer electrons, because of the damage they can cause when they penetrate satellites.

“Our theory indicates that so-called killer electrons that precipitate into the middle atmosphere are associated with the pulsating aurora, and could be involved in ozone destruction,” says Miyoshi.

The team next plans to test their theory by studying measurements taken during a space rocket mission called ‘loss through auroral microburst pulsations’ (LAMP), which is due to launch in December 2021. LAMP is a collaboration between NASA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Nagoya University, and other institutions. LAMP experiments will be able to observe the killer electrons associated with the pulsating aurora.

The paper, “Relativistic Electron Microbursts as High‐Energy Tail of Pulsating Aurora Electrons,” was published online in Geophysical Research Letters on October 13, 2020.


Pulsating aurora mysteries uncovered with help from NASA’s THEMIS mission


More information:
Y. Miyoshi et al. Relativistic Electron Microbursts as High‐Energy Tail of Pulsating Aurora Electrons, Geophysical Research Letters (2020). DOI: 10.1029/2020GL090360
Provided by
Read more

Family of slain Utah college student confronts her killer

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Family members of a Utah college student who was found strangled and burned last year following a search for her that captured the nation’s attention called the man who pleaded guilty to her murder a “monster” Friday as they confronted him before he was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.



FILE - In this July 1, 2019, file photo, Ashley Fine speaks during a vigil for Mackenzie Lueck at the university in Salt Lake City. A tech worker pleaded guilty Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, in the death of Lueck, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ayoola A. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. (Jeremy Harmon/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this July 1, 2019, file photo, Ashley Fine speaks during a vigil for Mackenzie Lueck at the university in Salt Lake City. A tech worker pleaded guilty Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, in the death of Lueck, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ayoola A. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. (Jeremy Harmon/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)

Mackenzie Lueck’s father, Gregory Lueck, told Ayoola A. Ajayi that he had no compassion for him because Ajayi had showed no compassion for his daughter, and said he hopes Ajayi spends the rest of his life in prison looking over his shoulder in fear.

Loading...

Load Error

Ajayi has acknowledged he planned the death of the 23-year-old Lueck, whom he met on a dating app and arranged to meet in a park. After they returned to his home, he bound and strangled her, then burned and hid her body while police and loved ones searched for her, authorities say.

“I’m not sure you even have anything to look forward to in the afterlife, if you believe in that,” Gregory Lueck said. “My daughter Mackenzie Lueck was a sweet, amazing young lady with the world ahead of her. She was a kindhearted person that cared about others. Now, I will not have the opportunity to see her blossom in life.”

Her cousin, Carly Stevens, said through tears: “This is a nightmare you can’t wake up from. I will never be able to forgive what happened to her. I will never forgive the monster who took her life. Never in my life have I felt anger the way I have the last 16 months. Never have I been so fearful for my life because I know how real evil is in this world.”



FILE - In this Dec. 20, 2019, file photo, Ayoola A. Ajayi appears in 3rd District Court in Salt Lake City. Ajayi pleaded guilty in the death of a Utah college student Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole in the death of 23-year-old Mackenzie Lueck. (Jeffrey D. Allred/The Deseret News via AP, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Dec. 20, 2019, file photo, Ayoola A. Ajayi appears in 3rd District Court in Salt Lake City. Ajayi pleaded guilty in the death of a Utah college student Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole in the death of 23-year-old Mackenzie Lueck. (Jeffrey D. Allred/The Deseret News via AP, File)

The Lueck family had not said much publicly since their daughter’s charred remains were found in the summer of 2019 in Ajayi’s backyard in Salt

Read more

Fortnite’s latest Halloween mode turns you into a killer ghost

Fortnite kicked off its annual “Fortnitemares” Halloween event this week, and this year, you get to play as a killer ghost.

In this year’s Fortnitemares mode, the Fortnite island is packed with spooky touches — a foreboding fog can hang over the island, houses have Halloween decorations, and I’ve even found a witch’s hut surrounded by rideable brooms. But the real twist in Fortnitemares happens when you die: after your untimely demise, you’re returned to the island as a ghost so you can hunt — and troll — the surviving humans.

As a ghost, you can consume materials, health items, guns, and even the Marvel-themed superpowers littered around the map so that the humans can’t use them against you. If you stand still, your purple body disappears so you can hide in plain sight (though you can be spotted thanks to your still-visible glowing eyes). Instead of guns, you rely on a set of sharp claws to fight opponents at close range.

But perhaps most importantly, you also have a power that lets you scan for nearby human players. If the scan finds somebody, you’ll see a little red indicator of where they are on your screen and on your map. And crucially, that scan alerts ghosts in your vicinity to the presence of surviving humans, meaning they can join your hunt for the leftover players.

The introduction of the ghosts completely changes the dynamics of a usual Fortnite match. I’m not quite as eager to jump into big firefights as usual, as any player I defeat could return as a ghost to get their revenge. And if I’m one of the last surviving humans, I have to constantly be on alert for dangerous ghost hordes.

I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to survive against all of the ghosts, but I’m having a lot of fun trying. Though when I inevitably die, I love channeling my spookiest ghost self into terrorizing the humans.

The previous Fortnitemares events added zombies and the chance to take down a giant monster, so the opportunity to actually come back from the dead is yet another example of how Epic works to keep Fortnite fresh, even with its annual holiday events. This year’s Fortnitemares event takes place until November 3rd, so you still have some time left to get your ghost on. The game is also celebrating Halloween night by featuring an in-game virtual concert from reggaeton star J Balvin.

Source Article

Read more

The Phenom and The Legend Killer’ Shows What The Undertaker Means to Randy Orton’s Career

When the WWE announced 30 Days of the Deadman, a series of weekly shows involving Undertaker content on the Network, I wasn’t surprised. “The Deadman” continues to be a huge draw for the wrestling promotion and this year’s “The Last Ride” documentary was a rare and important look into the life of Mark Calaway.

Starting this Sunday, The Undertaker celebration begins with WWE Untold: The Phenom and The Legend Killer, which looks at the rivalry between The Undertaker and Randy Orton from 2005.

The year-long rivalry took place 15 years ago and Undertaker and Orton’s place in the company were very different. Taker was wrestling much more frequently then and Orton was just coming into his own as one of the top heels in the company after adopting the “Legend Killer” moniker. The documentary does a great job of showing that difference in experience, but a huge takeaway from the 40-minute documentary isn’t so much how both men navigated the rivalry, but how The Undertaker helped bring Orton’s career to the next level. Because of that, it feels much more like an Orton documentary than a Taker one.

wwe undertaker randy orton hiac armageddon
Undertaker celebrating his victory over Randy Orton at Armageddon 2005.
WWE

The documentary starts with Orton and Callaway talking about an incident on an episode of SmackDown where Randy is set to hit Taker with a steel chair–back when headshots were still allowed. Orton, inexperienced, misses his mark by a few inches and actually tears the skin off of Taker’s forehead down to his nose, leaving “The Deadman” laying with his face full of blood.

Orton explains that’s how he learned what a “receipt” is the hard way, something viewers will see as the documentary goes on.

Unlike “The Last Ride,” there’s no backstage footage of wrestlers interacting, but in typical WWE Untold fashion, Orton, Calaway and other WWE officials and personalities talk about some of the biggest moments of their rivalry and it gives a lot more insight into what was going through their minds during this time period.

“I was back doing what I was comfortable, being a prick, being a bad guy, being a heel in the wrestling business,” Orton says in the documentary after leaning into the “Legend Killer” role. “That’s what I always felt the most comfortable doing and I was right back to where I was happy.”

The documentary revolves around four major matches in their rivalry. WrestleMania 21, SummerSlam, the casket match at No Mercy and the Hell in a Cell match at Armageddon. Each segment offers different takes and how those matches and stories were put together.

“Cowboy” Bob Orton, Randy’s father, is a welcome surprise in this documentary. He gives his take on how the events went down when he began working with his son following the SummerSlam match.

Producer Bruce Prichard is also involved in the documentary giving a peek into how backstage officials reacted during some of the feud’s high-risk stunts like when Randy set the casket–with Taker inside–on fire

Read more