Industries like healthcare, tech, and education are poised to add a lot of high-paying jobs in the next decade. We found how to break into those fields.



a man and a woman sitting at a desk: Software developer is one of the best jobs of the future. Maskot/Getty Images


© Maskot/Getty Images
Software developer is one of the best jobs of the future. Maskot/Getty Images

Bianca Banuelos, who comes from a family of nurses, studied to become a certified nursing assistant while applying to nursing school at Ventura Training Institute, a vocational school in Southern California created by the registered nurse Jannet Wharton.

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She was also doing research in endocrinology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles but wanted to work more with patients, so she decided to become a certified nursing assistant.

Though Banuelos initially wanted to try a job outside nursing but still within healthcare, she ultimately decided to follow in her family’s footsteps. It just so happens that this occupation is one that is expected to grow faster than most jobs in the US over the next decade.

Though the pandemic is affecting employment across all industries, some industries are expected to grow over the next decade based on pre-pandemic data. If you are thinking about which kind of career you want, you may want to look at the education background and the skills you will need to succeed in industries with high-paying, high-growth occupations.

We recently ranked the top 30 jobs of the future, based on Labor Department projections for how they’re set to grow over the next decade and how well they pay. You can check out the full ranking here.

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projections, the top 30 jobs on our ranking are set to collectively add as many as 2.3 million jobs between 2019 and 2029.

Most of the occupations on our ranking fell into five industries and categories: healthcare, tech, education, professional services, and skilled trades. We took a deep dive into the educational and experience requirements needed to get started in each of those sectors, along with why they’re poised to see such strong growth in the next decade.

These are the jobs of the future — and how to get them.

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California State University, East Bay lists open jobs

California State University, East Bay published a public database of remote job vacancies across the country to help people struggling to find employment due to the pandemic.



a group of people standing in front of a building: The Valley Business and Technology Center on the campus of Cal State East Bay.


© Anda Chu/MediaNews Group/Bay Area News/Getty Images
The Valley Business and Technology Center on the campus of Cal State East Bay.

In a press release last week, the university said it wants to help “pull the rising unemployment level in the country back to its normal level.”

The university, about 30 miles east of San Francisco, said it regularly shares resources and job opportunities with its students but chose to expand services to the rest of the country to “enhance their chances of landing a job again.”

The database, which the university says is regularly updated, has more than 3,000 active job openings across different fields and industries. The list pulls from various job boards with remote-based positions, according to the university’s career and development page.

Slack, Salesforce, Zillow, Wayfair and Rosetta Stone are among the companies with jobs listed.

The United States continues to smash unemployment records with more than 21 million Americans currently receiving jobless benefits through some government program.

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How to plan 2020s career success: High-paying jobs in growth industries

  • Business Insider recently found 30 high-paying jobs that were poised for strong growth based on employment projections for between 2019 and 2029 and median wages in 2019.
  • The occupations at the top of our list fall into five main industries, all of which require different education, certifications, and skills.
  • The following is a look at the various paths to getting into these industries, according to career experts, an economist, and career sites.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Bianca Banuelos, who comes from a family of nurses, studied to become a certified nursing assistant while applying to nursing school at Ventura Training Institute, a vocational school in Southern California created by the registered nurse Jannet Wharton.

She was also doing research in endocrinology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles but wanted to work more with patients, so she decided to become a certified nursing assistant.

Though Banuelos initially wanted to try a job outside nursing but still within healthcare, she ultimately decided to follow in her family’s footsteps. It just so happens that this occupation is one that is expected to grow faster than most jobs in the US over the next decade.

Though the pandemic is affecting employment across all industries, some industries are expected to grow over the next decade based on pre-pandemic data. If you are thinking about which kind of career you want, you may want to look at the education background and the skills you will need to succeed in industries with high-paying, high-growth occupations.

We recently ranked the top 30 jobs of the future, based on Labor Department projections for how they’re set to grow over the next decade and how well they pay. You can check out the full ranking here, and in this article, we look at why these jobs are poised for strong growth and how to break into them.

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projections, the top 30 jobs on our ranking are set to collectively add as many as 2.3 million jobs between 2019 and 2029.

These are the jobs of the future — and how to get them.

You can keep scrolling to read the full list or click on one of the links below for a specific industry. If you’re interested in our methodology, look at the final section.

coronavirus nurses

Nurses administer care to a patient in the acute-care COVID-19 unit at Harborview Medical Center on May 7 in Seattle.


Karen Ducey/Getty Images



Healthcare roles are expected to see the most growth among occupational groups covered by BLS over the next decade.

The agency examined projections of the percent change between 2019 and 2029 in the number of people employed. It found six of the 10 fastest-growing jobs were in healthcare, including nurse practitioners and home health aides. Overall, this industry is expected to grow by about 15%, adding 2.4 million jobs.

The following chart replicated from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the percent change in the 10 fastest-growing jobs:

The Indeed Hiring

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As China’s economy picks up, new university grads are still looking for jobs

Graduates attend the commencement ceremony at Beihang University in Beijing, capital of China, June 29, 2020.

Ren Chao | Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

BEIJING — As China presses on with its economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, new university graduates are still trying to catch up.

By official and third-party accounts, the class of 2020 — at a record high of 8.74 million students — is having a harder time finding jobs than last year’s graduates.

There’s been a clear decline in hiring by the consumer goods industry, manufacturing, software and information technology services as a result of Covid-19’s spread, according to a report on prospects for China’s new graduates. The report “University Alumni Insights: Chinese Graduate Career Development Prospects 2020” was released Thursday by LinkedIn China and Beijing-based think tank Center for China and Globalization (CCG).

On the other hand, the health care, distance learning and legal industries have been less affected by the pandemic, and the number of people they are recruiting has remained relatively stable, the report said.

In fact, the analysis found there is a shortage of talent in the transportation and logistics, media and education sectors.

Covid-19 first emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan late last year, before spreading quickly within the country in January and February. Authorities temporarily shut down more than half the country in February.

The outbreak stalled domestically in March, but by that time, the coronavirus had spread rapidly overseas in a global pandemic. China’s economy contracted 6.8% in the first quarter. While officials are optimistic about the subsequent recovery, they remain cautious about uncertainty from the coronavirus’ continued spread abroad.

There will be more and more (study abroad) returnees… For them to return to China to get jobs, they face lots of challenges.

Miao Lu

vice president, Center for China and Globalization

“There are certainly many higher-education graduates who are still looking for jobs, and the class of 2021 will soon enter the job market,” Zhang Ying, director of the employment promotion department at the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security, said Wednesday, according to a CNBC translation of her Mandarin-language remarks.

Zhang said the government will continue to add policy support, including expansion of hiring by state-owned enterprises. She noted the public sector has absorbed 2.8 million of the graduates.

Graduates attend the commencement ceremony at Beihang University in Beijing, capital of China, June 29, 2020.

Ren Chao | Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Earlier this month, the National Bureau of Statistics said an unspecified unemployment rate for 20- to 24-year-olds holding at least a college degree — primarily new graduates — was 4 percentage points higher in September than a year ago, despite falling slightly from August.

Overall unemployment for urban areas as measured by an official survey — which many economists doubt the accuracy of —showed the rate fell to 5.4% in September from 5.6% in August. Anecdotally, many workers have had their pay cut or deferred. The statistics bureau said late

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LinkedIn’s Career Explorer helps you identify new kinds of jobs based on the skills you have

One of the key side-effects of the COVID-19 pandemic has been how it has played out in the economy. There are currently 12.6 million people out of work in the U.S. alone, with estimates from the International Labour Organization noting that globally some 245 million full-time jobs have been impacted.

To meet some of that challenge, today, LinkedIn is launching a new Career Explorer tool to help people find new jobs. Out in beta today in English (and adding further languages soon), this is not another job search engine. It’s a tool that matches a person’s skills with jobs that she or he might not have otherwise considered, and then provides pointers on what extra skills you might want to learn to be even more relevant.

Alongside this, LinkedIn is launching a new skills portal specifically to hone digital skills; subtle profile picture “frames” to indicate when you’re looking for work, or when you are hiring; and interview prep tools.

The launches come on the heels of the company confirming that it now has 722 million members (which may not be the same as active users, which it does not disclose), and with owner Microsoft noting in its earnings this week that LinkedIn has seen revenues increase 16% versus the same quarter a year ago.

Microsoft stock flat despite better-than-expected earnings, strong Azure growth

It doesn’t disclose actual numbers but said that the growth was driving by Marketing Solutions (its advertising business), which also seems to imply that its Talent Solutions (which is where the jobs/recruiting business sits) could use a boost.

The Career Explorer tool is perhaps the most interesting of the new features.

Built with flexibility in mind, LinkedIn is leaning on its own trove of data to map some career paths that people have taken, combining that with data it has on jobs that are currently in higher demand, and are extrapolating that to help people get more creative about jobs they could go for.

This would be especially useful if there are none in their current field, or if they are considering using the opportunity of a job loss to rethink what they are doing (if COVID-19 hasn’t done the rethinking for them).

The example that LinkedIn gives for how this works is a notable one. It notes that a food server and a customer service specialist (an in-demand job) have a 71% skills overlap.

Neither might be strictly considered a “knowledge worker” (interesting that LinkedIn is positioning itself in that way, as it’s been a tool largely dominated by the category up to now), but both interface with customers. LinkedIn uses the Explorer to then suggest what training you could undertake (on its platform) to learn or improve the skills you might not already have.

The Career Explorer is a progression along the road of a bigger strategy that LinkedIn has had to grow two areas of its business — education/training (LinkedIn Learning) and recruitment/job search — by building tools that help users leverage both

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Disney workers lose jobs, free college education vanishes

ORLANDO — Madeline “Madi” Portes keeps a bucket list full of things like visiting Paris and taking violin lessons. But No. 1 was always to get her college degree, and she never forgot that as the years went by.

Portes, of Clermont, failed several times to finish her schooling, coming from poor roots and unable to afford her classes as a working adult. Maybe this was her shot at age 61 to finally get it done when Walt Disney Co. announced in 2018 it would pay tuition upfront — and books, too — for its hourly employees.

Known as Disney Aspire, it was one of the most generous employer education programs in the country. Disney vowed to invest $150 million over five years to help lift workers out of poverty by fully funding their education. The program got started as the company reportedly saved at least $1.6 billion in the first year from the GOP corporate tax cuts.

What once felt like winning the lottery is now heartbreak. Walt Disney Co. last month revealed it was ending Aspire for at least some of the 28,000 workers it is laying off across the U.S. because of the coronavirus pandemic. About 15,500 of those employees are in Orlando.

For some, the decision cuts deeper than missing a steady paycheck.

“It’s the loss of hope. It was my very last hope,” Portes said, a part-time Disney World vacation planner working on a degree in legal studies online from Brandman University in California.

About 20,000 part-time and full-time company employees signed up for the education program which lets them study at a list of schools, including the University of Central Florida and Valencia College.

Disney would not say how many students are losing their jobs or how much Disney Aspire will now cost as the company’s theme park division operates with a significantly smaller workforce in a post-coronavirus world.

“While the pandemic has challenged our business and our workforce in immeasurable ways, the Disney Aspire initiative remains important to us,” Disney spokeswoman Andrea Finger said in a statement. “Disney Aspire will continue to be available to our eligible employees, including those who are on furlough.”

The hourly Disney workers who will be let go in December and have already enrolled in college degrees can finish this semester. After that, it’s over, leaving many already grappling with how to pay rent and bills to decide: How do I finish my education?

Some additional resources may be available to help them at their schools, financial aid and at CareerSource Central Florida, which received $7 million in federal coronavirus funding in July.

Laid-off employees learning a trade, English or getting their GEDs through Disney Aspire will be allowed to complete their program. At Valencia College alone, 511 Disney Aspire students are studying English as a second language, according to the school.

KEEP FIGHTING

Portes was one of six children raised by a single mother with an elementary school education growing up in a working-class neighborhood in New

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Medicine, Education, and Investment Jobs at High Risk of Losing Talent, According to Workforce Logiq’s New Q3 2020 Labor Market Report

Predictive workforce intelligence shows all but three U.S. states – New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New Jersey – decreased in employee volatility

Workforce Logiq, a global provider of AI-powered workforce intelligence, technology, and services, today released its Q3 2020 Workforce Management Benchmark Report. The market analysis, which offers a predictive quarterly snapshot of U.S. talent volatility for professional and knowledge workers, reveals the total number of these employees categorized as volatile – and more likely to switch jobs – is down 7% over last quarter.

“The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have a rollercoaster impact on the labor market. Our benchmarks indicate employment sentiment is stabilizing after a highly volatile second quarter,” said Jim Burke, Workforce Logiq’s CEO. “Given recent corporate downsizing announcements, new COVID-19 spikes, and continued economic difficulty, employee volatility and retention risk may pick back up through end-of-year. Every employer needs to be equipped with data and context to make fast, accurate, and cost-effective talent decisions that help them ride out the uncertainty and plan an optimal workforce to take their organizations into 2021.”

The report, which explores employment volatility across major industries, job functions, metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), and states, is based on Workforce Logiq’s proprietary and patent-pending workforce analytics and data science. Key findings include:

  • All but three of the top 35 job categories – Doctors and Medicine (up 13%), Education (up 10%), and Investment (up 2%) – saw decreased risk of losing talent over the quarter. Public Safety (-33%) and Skilled Trade (-26%) showed the biggest volatility decreases. Of the 19 industry sectors, 13 showed quarterly score degradation compared to only five in the second quarter.

  • Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation jumped to the top spot for worker volatility. At 16% above the national average, this hard-hit industry moved ahead of Finance and Insurance (60.1), Mining, Quarrying, and Gas Extraction (60.0), Utilities (56.7), and Transportation and Warehousing (55.9) with the highest average TRR ScoreSM (60.3).

  • Recruiting jobs and finance roles are now tied for having the largest percentage of employees open to exploring new opportunities. Both functions are 76% above the national average for volatility. Marketing (74%), HR (66%), Investment (54%), and Engineering (52%) follow closely behind.

  • The utility industry experienced the highest increase in talent retention risk. The sector’s employment volatility increased 13% over Q2. Mining, Quarrying, and Gas Extraction was one of the few industries to show improvement (-9%).

  • District of Columbia (DC) is now the most volatile geographic area in the U.S., moving ahead of New York at 32% above the average for worker volatility. This shift is likely due to spikes in election and COVID-19 uncertainty, given DC’s heavy concentration of government and public service jobs and lack of operational control over federal buildings. All the top 25 MSAs, and all states except for New Hampshire, New Mexico, and New Jersey, decreased in volatility. Baltimore-Columbia-Townson, MD saw a considerable 27% improvement.

“Top workforce leaders anticipate and hedge against both retention risk and talent gaps with fast, strategic moves,” said Dr. Christy

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