NASA releases Halloween playlist of ‘sinister’ space sounds

Just in time for Halloween, NASA has released a playlist of spooky sounds from space.

“You may have heard some of the creaks, cracks, and cackling noises of our universe before,” explains NASA in a statement. “Using data from our spacecraft, we’ve gathered a NEW collection of sinister sounds from the depths of space in time for Halloween.”

The Halloween playlist, which is posted to Soundcloud, is filled with eerie “moans” and “whistles,” the space agency notes.

The creepy sounds include a possible “Marsquake” recorded on the red planet by NASA’s Mars InSight Lander, sounds from the ancient universe, the center of the Milky Way and plasma waves from Jupiter’s ionosphere captured by the Juno spacecraft.

NASA IMAGE SHOWS SPOOKY ‘HALLOWEEN’ SUN

Earlier this week, NASA also highlighted an image of a very spooky sun.

The image of the "halloween" sun.

The image of the “halloween” sun.
(Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/SDO)

In the remarkable image, the sun bears a striking resemblance to a jack-o’-lantern. In an email to Fox News, NASA compared the solar image to a “giant floating space pumpkin.”

“Active regions on the sun combined to look something like a jack-o’-lantern’s face on Oct. 8, 2014,” explains NASA in a post on its website Thursday. “The active regions appear brighter because those are areas that emit more light and energy – markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.”

“This image blends together two sets of wavelengths at 171 and 193 angstroms, typically colorized in gold and yellow, to create a particularly Halloween-like appearance,” the space agency added.

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The angstrom measurement is used for the wavelength of light. “This image is a blend of 171 and 193 angstrom light as captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory,” NASA explained in the post.

Fox News’ Chris Ciaccia contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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Halloween weekend’s Blue Moon to last through Sunday

NASA Astronaut Chris Cassidy, serving as commander of the Expedition 63 mission aboard the International Space Station, took these photos of Hurricane Laura as it continued to strengthen in the Gulf of Mexico on August 25. Photo courtesy of NASA | License Photo

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Mars Wrigley warehouse workers say they’re getting yelled at for washing their hands and wiping down equipment amid an $8 billion boom for candy this Halloween



a person wearing a costume: Inside the battle to get hazard pay at a Mars Wrigley's warehouse. Hollis Johnson/Business Insider


© Hollis Johnson/Business Insider
Inside the battle to get hazard pay at a Mars Wrigley’s warehouse. Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

  • Workers at an Illinois distribution center for candy maker Mars Wrigley have been demanding the company provide hazard pay and improve safety protocols during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Mars Wrigley produces popular candies like Twix, Skittles, and M&M’s. Ahead of this Halloween, the National Confectioners Association reported a 25% increase in chocolate sales.
  • Michael Samuel, a former worker at the Mars warehouse in Illinois, told Business Insider supervisors reprimanded him for taking extra time to wipe down equipment. Samuel helped get 100 signatures in a petition for safer working conditions before being fired on October 1, he said.
  • Mars declined to comment on the claims regarding working conditions in its Joliet, Illinois, warehouse because it said the workers are employed by third-party firms XPO Logistics and DHL. 
  • “They are not employed by Mars Incorporated,” said Caitlin Kemper, external affairs manager at Mars, regarding Samuel and his colleagues. 
  • DHL refuted “any allegations of unfair labor practices,” but declined to comment further due to an ongoing NLRB complaint regarding the Joliet warehouse. XPO Logistics spokesperson Joe Checkler said the company’s “primary focus is the health and safety of our employees.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Michael Samuel said he used to spend 10 hours a day, seven days a week loading trucks with popular Halloween candy like Snickers, M&M’s, and Twix — until October 1, when he was fired from his job at a Mars Wrigley distribution center. 

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Samuel, 45, said he joined the Mars distribution center near Chicago in 2017 as a forklift operator, having been hired through the logistics firm DHL. 

Samuel was part of a group of workers from the warehouse in Joliet, Illinois, organizing to demand hazard pay and better working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Essential employees of many large companies have fought for better benefits since the pandemic broke out earlier this year.

As shoppers are set to spend $8 billion on Halloween this year, including 25% more on candy purchases than in recent years, some workers warn of a nightmare within the Mars distribution center.

Samuel said he had been reprimanded by supervisors for taking bathroom breaks to wash his hands and spending extra time wiping down equipment. 



a group of people standing next to a sign: Mars Wrigley workers demonstrate outside company headquarters on September 4. Courtesy of Warehouse Workers for Justice


© Courtesy of Warehouse Workers for Justice
Mars Wrigley workers demonstrate outside company headquarters on September 4. Courtesy of Warehouse Workers for Justice

Because logistics companies DHL and XPO Logistics hired all workers in the Illinois warehouse where Samuel worked, Mars declined to comment on the claims detailed in this story. “They are not employed by Mars Incorporated,” said Caitlin Kemper, external affairs manager at Mars. A DHL spokesperson said the firm refutes “any allegations of unfair labor practices,” and XPO Logistics spokesperson Joe Checkler said the company’s “primary focus is the health and safety of our employees.”

But Samuel said after his experience working at the Mars plant, he’ll be buying candy from someplace

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The truth behind the Halloween 2020 blue moon, according to an Astronomer

October of 2020 is an exicting month for the moon, with a full moon on the first day of the month, and the last day of the month, making the full moon on October 31st 2020, a blue moon.

“In this case, the moon’s cycle is under 30 days, because of that you can have an event that you get more than one full moon in a given month,” Jackie Faherty, an astronomer at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, tells Yahoo Life. “The second full moon of any given month, we refer to as a ‘blue moon’.”

This full moon will not actually be blue, however Faherty says that there are occasions where the moon can appear in hues of orange or blue, due to an effect caused by the Earth’s atmosphere. “It changes color as it passes through the most amount of atmosphere, it can create these gorgeous colors for you,” she says. “So it will look orange, it can even look blueish.”

According to Faherty, however, a blue moon occurs about every two to three years, which she doesn’t consider a very rare occurance. She says a more accurate rare phenomena to reference would be a Milky Way supernova, when a star explodes in our galaxy, which happens approximately every 50 years. A “very very rare” occurrence according to Faherty.

None the less, Faherty says any full moon can be spectacular to watch, and she recommends trying to watch the moonrise as well if you can. “Everybody gets all romantic about the sunrise and the sunset but a moonrise and a moonset can be very dramatic and exciting,” Faherty tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “They are spectacular.”

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Cleveland Clinic, UH bring Halloween fun to patients

Halloween is different this year, but dedicated volunteers from two local hospital systems went out of their way to make it special for kids.

CLEVELAND — On a cold and rainy day this week, at University Hospitals Rainbow Center for Women and Children, dozens of volunteers stood outside for hours, to bring children a special Halloween.

“When COVID hit and we knew we couldn’t do our normal party, we decided to bring it outdoors and do a drive-thru event,” said Jennifer Walker, manager of the UH Rainbow Injury Prevention Center.

A line of cars was wrapped around the block Monday evening, waiting to see these smiling faces at Trunk-or-Treat.

Hospital workers, police officers, and state troopers were on hand, giving out gifts and goodies at 10 different stations. 

Volunteers even handed out free booster seats for registered participants.

“It might be some of the only Halloweens these kids get to have if they’re not able to trick-or-treat or go to something that’s safe,” Walker said. “So, we’re just happy to provide that to them.”

A few miles away, at Cleveland Clinic Children’s, Stephanie Haines, and her 9-year-old Chance, are feeling grateful for the hospital’s reverse trick-or-treat.

Chance has been admitted since Saturday. He has epilepsy, and this year has been particularly hard.

“We’ve been dealing with the seizures since 2016. He had a lobectomy. He had part of his brain removed in 2017 to help, and the seizures have come back and they’re worse than they were before surgery,” Stephanie shared.

Stephanie, of Navarre, has four other children at home. The balance can be exhausting. So when dedicated volunteers appeared in costume to make her son’s day, she was touched beyond words.

“It brings tears to my eyes … the amount of happiness that the Clinic brings here. I don’t have time to take on the ‘extra,’ and that’s what they’re doing. I don’t have the words to express how grateful I am … everything that they’ve done,” she said.


RELATED: Tips for a safe Halloween from pediatric infectious disease specialists

RELATED: Preemies celebrate first Halloween in adorable costumes

RELATED: Superheroes wash windows outside Akron Children’s Hospital: video

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Listen: NASA offers ‘creepy’ playlist of space sounds for Halloween

NASA Astronaut Chris Cassidy, serving as commander of the Expedition 63 mission aboard the International Space Station, took these photos of Hurricane Laura as it continued to strengthen in the Gulf of Mexico on August 25. Photo courtesy of NASA | License Photo

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The truth behind the Halloween 2020 blue moon, according to an Astronomer [Video]

October of 2020 is an exicting month for the moon, with a full moon on the first day of the month, and the last day of the month, making the full moon on October 31st 2020, a blue moon.

“In this case, the moon’s cycle is under 30 days, because of that you can have an event that you get more than one full moon in a given month,” Jackie Faherty, an astronomer at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, tells Yahoo Life. “The second full moon of any given month, we refer to as a ‘blue moon’.”

This full moon will not actually be blue, however Faherty says that there are occasions where the moon can appear in hues of orange or blue, due to an effect caused by the Earth’s atmosphere. “It changes color as it passes through the most amount of atmosphere, it can create these gorgeous colors for you,” she says. “So it will look orange, it can even look blueish.”

According to Faherty, however, a blue moon occurs about every two to three years, which she doesn’t consider a very rare occurance. She says a more accurate rare phenomena to reference would be a Milky Way supernova, when a star explodes in our galaxy, which happens approximately every 50 years. A “very very rare” occurrence according to Faherty.

None the less, Faherty says any full moon can be spectacular to watch, and she recommends trying to watch the moonrise as well if you can. “Everybody gets all romantic about the sunrise and the sunset but a moonrise and a moonset can be very dramatic and exciting,” Faherty tells Yahoo Lifestyle. “They are spectacular.”

Video Transcript

JACKIE FAHERTY: In October of 2020, we will have two full moons– at the very beginning of the month, and at the very end of the month. And in this case, the moon’s cycle is under 30 days. Because of that, you can have an event that you get more than one full moon in a given month. And the second full moon of any given month we refer to as a Blue Moon.

Now, the expression, as it goes, is “once in a blue moon.” That seems like something that shouldn’t happen a lot. But it’s not really the case for blue moons. You get a blue moon every two-ish years or so.

I don’t like to call things that can happen many times over my lifetime a rare event, so my preference is for something that’s maybe going to happen once if not maybe ever in my lifetime. Rather than once in a blue moon, you might note something that really does happen very rarely. And in the Milky Way, that would be having a supernova going off– so when a star explodes in our own galaxy and gets so bright that it even rivals the moon. And I would say then “once in a Milky Way supernova” would be the expression that we

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NASA Shares ‘Galactic Pumpkin’ Photo Captured By Hubble For Halloween

KEY POINTS

  • Hubble shared an image of two galaxies forming what astronomers dubbed the “Greater Pumpkin”
  • The image is a result of a collision between two galaxies, the NGC 2292 and NGC 2293
  • The galaxy pair is located 120 million light-years away from the Milky Way galaxy

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a “galactic pumpkin” just in time for this year’s Halloween. The Hubble captured an image of a pair of galaxies that looks like a Halloween decoration in space as they are in the early stages of a collision.

Described as the “Greater Pumpkin” by astronomers, the photo NASA shared on its Twitter and website shows what appears to be two eyes and a crooked smile inside a pumpkin-shaped head. The object emits a bright orange color, while the sector surrounding the “smile” is bluish.

The so-called “Greater Pumpkin” consists of two galaxies, identified as NGC 2292 and NGC 2293, that together span 109,000 light-years in diameter.

The orange color emitting from the two galaxies is due to aging red stars, while the bluish hue of its smile is due to newborn star clusters scattered along a newly forming dusty arm. The “eyes” of the pumpkin, meanwhile, are actually concentrations of stars around a pair of supermassive black holes.

Check out the image of Hubble’s “galactic pumpkin” below.

Explaining the collision, Hubble astronomers said on the NASA website that galaxies lose their flattened spiral disks when they crash into one another, and their stars are gathered into a football-shaped volume of space, resulting in an elliptical galaxy.

However, astronomers said NGC 2292 and NGC 2293 may be on their way to merging into a rare giant spiral galaxy. Although it still depends on the trajectory of the pair’s collision, this scenario has only a handful of other examples, making it undoubtedly rare.

“The ghostly arm making the ‘smile’ may be just the beginning of the process of rebuilding a spiral galaxy,” Hubble astronomers said. “The arm embraces both galaxies. It most likely formed when interstellar gas was compressed as the two galaxies began to merge. The higher density precipitates new star formation.”

Astronomer William Keel, of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, also predicted that the pair of galaxies will eventually combine to form a giant luminous spiral galaxy like UGC 2885, Rubin’s Galaxy, which is over twice the diameter of the Milky Way galaxy.

NGC 2292 and NGC 2293 are located about 120 million light-years away from the Milky Way in the constellation Canis Major.

GalaxyClusterCollision Astronomers have discovered what happens when the eruption from a supermassive black hole is swept up by the collision and merger of two galaxy clusters. This composite image contains X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio emission from the GMRT (red), and optical data from Subaru (red, green, and blue) of the colliding galaxy clusters called Abell 3411 and Abell 3412. These and other telescopes were used to analyze how the combination of these two powerful phenomena can create an extraordinary cosmic particle

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Syracuse University doesn’t want to see another superspreader party on Halloween

Syracuse, N.Y. – One off-campus party at Syracuse University early this month quickly resulted in about 80 students testing positive for coronavirus and another 250 being quarantined.



James Blunt standing on a stage holding a guitar: James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Brengola Morena/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM

That’s why Mike Haynie, an SU vice chancellor, wants students to avoid large gatherings this Saturday on Halloween, traditionally a big college party holiday, and follow safety protocols to protect themselves from the virus.

“A Halloween mask is not a suitable substitute for a face covering that serves a public health purpose,” Haynie said.



a person holding a microphone: James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Brengola Morena/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM

Campus and Syracuse police will step up patrols this weekend in neighborhoods bordering the campus.



a man holding a microphone: James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Brengola Morena/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM

More than 80% of the 220 coronavirus cases reported so far this semester at SU originated off campus.

The off-campus party on Walnut Avenue early this month nearly forced SU to halt in-person classes. The state requires colleges to suspend in-person classes and switch to online learning when they get 100 positive cases within a 14-day period. SU missed the threshold by just 20 cases.



a person standing on a stage holding a microphone: James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Brengola Morena/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM

On Oct. 2, SU had just four coronavirus cases on campus. Within three days the number skyrocketed to 80 because of the party. If SU had not quickly rounded up all the students who were infected and exposed, the outbreak would have gotten out of control, he said.



James Blunt wearing a suit and tie holding a gun: James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Brengola Morena/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM

Some students involved in the party were disciplined, but Haynie would not disclose how many or details of the sanctions.

He said most SU students have been diligent about following health and safety rules. Students will leave campus Nov. 25 and return Jan. 24.

Although SU plans to offer in-person classes again next semester, it won’t bring students back if Onondaga County experiences a steep increase in coronavirus cases, Haynie said.

SU was able to reopen in August because the positive coronavirus test rate in Onondaga County was about 0.7%, he said. SU probably would not have reopened had the positivity rate here been in the double digits like it was in Miami in August when the University of Miami reopened, he said. Onondaga County has seen cases steadily increase in recent weeks. The county reported 70 cases Wednesday, a new daily record high. The county’s average positivity rate is now 1.1%.



James Blunt holding a microphone: James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Brengola Morena/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
James Blunt performs live at DatchForum Assago in Milan, Italy, on April 2nd, 2008. Photo by Morena Brengola/ABACAPRESS.COM

Haynie said SU will closely monitor

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Rare Micro Blue Moon will rise on Halloween as full Hunter’s Moon

This weekend’s full moon will not only be a Blue Moon – which is what we call the second full moon in a calendar month – but it’s going to be a Micro Moon, too, according to NASA. What’s that? Think of it as the opposite of those “supermoons” that we’ve been getting used to lately.

This Saturday’s full moon is also a rare because it’s rising on Halloween for the first time in 76 years. The last time we had a full moon on All Hallows’ Eve was 1944, according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac.

The next time all U.S. time zones will see a full moon is 2039, so don’t miss your chance.

While the moon officially becomes full on Saturday, it will appear full beginning Thursday night and last through Sunday. So it will feel like a full moon weekend.

October moons

October 2020 has two full moons, making the Oct. 31 moon a Blue Moon, according to NASA.

It will also be a full Hunter’s Moon. In his latest NASA blog, Gordon Johnston explains how this moon got its name.

“According to the Farmer’s Almanac, with the leaves falling and the deer fattened, this was the time to hunt,” he said. “Since the harvesters had reaped the fields, hunters could easily see the animals that have come out to glean (and the foxes that have come out to prey on them). The earliest use of the term ‘Hunter’s Moon’ cited in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1710.”

And what about that “Micro Moon” label? Johnston says: “Since this full moon occurs near when the moon is farthest from the Earth (apogee), this is a Micro Moon (the opposite of a ‘Supermoon’).”

Other names for this moon are the Beaver Moon, the Frost or Frosty Moon and the Snow Moon, he said.

Oct. 31 will have a Full Moon, Three Planets and Bright Stars

In addition to this Full Micro Blue Moon, Johnston says there will be some other treats for sky-watchers. Look up and see if you can find these:

  • As twilight ends Saturday night, Jupiter will appear like a bright spot in the south-southwest sky. Saturn will be to its upper left, and Mars will be visible in the east/southeast.
  • “The bright star appearing nearly overhead (at 84 degrees above the northern horizon) will be Deneb, one of the three bright stars in the ‘Summer Triangle.’ The other stars in the triangle are Vega to the west and Altair to the south-southwest.”

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Busy squirrels, thick-skinned onions are signs of bad winter ahead, folklore says

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