Michigan State University holding virtual ceremonies for fall 2020 graduates

EAST LANSING, MI — All commencement ceremonies at Michigan State University for fall 2020 graduates will be held virtually, the university announced Thursday.

More than 2,600 graduates will be recognized Dec. 18 and 19 at commencement ceremonies that will be streamed on the MSU commencement website, according to a university release. The names of graduates will be scrolled on the screens at the end of the ceremonies, the release said.

“I am incredibly proud of these students for not only completing their degrees but doing so under such difficult circumstances,” said MSU President Samuel L. Stanley Jr. “It is fitting to have three highly accomplished alumni serving as our keynote speakers. They remind us of the impact we can have on the world as Spartans.”

Scheduling for spring 2021 commencement is currently being developed, according to the commencement website. Details will be posted in late January, according to the website.

Todd Penegor, president at CEO of The Wendy’s Co., will be the keynote speaker for the master’s degree ceremony at 10 a.m. Dec. 18, the release states. Penegor grew up in Iron Mountain, Michigan, and earned a bachelor of arts in accounting in 1987 and an MBA in finance in 1989 from MSU.

Princeton University professor Mara Tienda will address doctorate degree recipients at 2 p.m. Dec. 18. Tienda, a sociology and public affairs professor at Princeton, was a member of MSU’s Honors College and earned her bachelor of arts in Spanish from the university in 1972.

Draymond Green, a current member of the NBA’s Golden State Warriors, will address the baccalaureate degree recipients at 10 a.m. Dec. 19, the release states. In his time at MSU, Green helped the Spartans earn two Final Four appearances and a Big Ten Tournament championship in 2012.

More information on the commencement ceremonies can be found here.

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Mom of 5 graduates from college nearly 30 years after starting her degree

Tyra Muhammad returned to college nearly three decades after she first started.

Tyra Muhammad graduated from college nearly 30 years after she started her undergraduate studies.

The 46-year-old mother of five graduated last month from Grambling State University, which she attended at the same time as three of her five children.

“I had the thought of, ‘I’m too old to do this. I’m too old to go back to school and be back on campus,’ but my kids encouraged me and were there for me,” Muhammad told “Good Morning America,” adding with a laugh, “People at times would think we were all siblings [on campus] together, so I appreciated that.”

Muhammad, an English major, first entered Grambling State as a freshman in 1994.

She met her husband in school and the two married at the end of Muhammad’s freshman year, when she was 19. The couple soon started their family and Muhammad paused her college career when she became pregnant and it was too hard physically to stay in school.

Muhammad would go to become a certified nursing assistant and tried a few times to restart at Grambling State but said her studies always took second place to motherhood and she never finished her degree.

“I kind of put myself on the back burner, which is generally what most mothers and women do,” she said.

Muhammad and her husband later divorced and by 2018, with her youngest child now a teenager, she was ready to go back to college. She re-enrolled at Grambling State, where three of her children were already enrolled.

“I sat my children down and talked to them and asked them if it’d be awkward if I attended at the same time and they said no,” recalled Muhammad. “I always wanted my degree and also wanted to be an example to my children in terms of the importance of education.”

Muhammad, whose children are now ages 15, 19, 22, 23 and 26, said the family got positive attention on campus because they would so often be seen together. She had at least one class with one of her children and enjoyed doing campus activities and study sessions with the others.

“It was a fun time,” she said. “I really, really enjoyed my time in school with my children.”

Muhammad’s son Elijah, 22, said he and his siblings also enjoyed the rare chance to attend college with their mom.

“It was fun for me,” said Elijah, who is studying business management and marketing. “Every parent is curious as to what their child is doing on campus and she got to see what I was doing and what

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Survey finds university graduates are more likely to think life is unfair

Think life is unfair? It’s likely you’re a university graduate: Survey finds fewer than one in three believe they get what they deserve

  • University graduates more likely to think life in Britain is unfair, survey found
  • Fewer than one in three believe they get what they deserve, researchers found
  • But nearly half of those who never progressed beyond GCSEs think people tend to get out of life what they put in, the report discovered 

University graduates are much more likely to think life in Britain is unfair, researchers found.

Fewer than one in three believe they get what they deserve, a survey discovered.  

But nearly half of those who never progressed beyond GCSEs – and who are usually poorer – think people tend to get out of life what they put in.

Women are less likely than men to believe adults get what they deserve, the report found.

Those who think society is unjust are also more likely to be politically active, often with Left-wing views. There was little difference between age groups over feelings of inequality. 

University graduates are much more likely to think life in Britain is unfair, researchers found (file picture)

University graduates are much more likely to think life in Britain is unfair, researchers found (file picture)

The Government-funded British Social Attitudes survey was based on interviews with nearly 3,000 adults.

It said: ‘Although those with lower levels of education are likely to have less wealth than those with degrees, they are still less likely to say differences in wealth are too large.  

‘This suggests that these perceptions are not simply driven by an individual’s personal interest and experience of British society.’

The findings are likely to reinforce the perception that a highly-educated and often metropolitan elite cling largely to left-wing economic thinking, while a less favoured majority of the population are happier to accept that some people will make more money than others.

They follow last year’s general election rejection of Jeremy Corbyn’s left-led Labour Party by the ‘red wall’ seats in the north of England.

The survey found that 32 per cent of those educated to degree level thought people get what they deserve, against 47 per cent of people educated to GCSE standard or less.

A similar pattern showed itself when people were broken down by income. Nearly half, 46 per cent, of the poorest fifth of people thought people get what they deserve, against only 37 per cent of the richest fifth.

The findings are likely to reinforce the perception that a highly-educated and often metropolitan elite cling largely to left-wing economic thinking. They follow last year's general election rejection of Jeremy Corbyn's (pictured) left-led Labour Party by the 'red wall' seats in the north of England

The findings are likely to reinforce the perception that a highly-educated and often metropolitan elite cling largely to left-wing economic thinking. They follow last year’s general election rejection of Jeremy Corbyn’s (pictured) left-led Labour Party by the ‘red wall’ seats in the north of England

Women were more likely to object to inequality than men. Some 33 per cent thought the deserving usually win out, against 45 per cent of men.

There was little difference between age groups over whether Britain is an unfair

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