Mesmerizing NASA video captures decades of the sun’s spitting fury

Cancel what you’re doing. Grab a hot beverage, put up your feet and hit play on NASA’s eye-searing video of our moody sun and what it’s been up to for the last couple decades.



a close up of a satellite in space: This illustration shows the ESA/NASA SOHO with the object of its study. NASA


© Provided by CNET
This illustration shows the ESA/NASA SOHO with the object of its study. NASA

Dec. 2 is the 25th anniversary of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), a joint project from NASA and the European Space Agency. To celebrate, the agencies released a dramatic, nearly 50-minute-long video showing the sun blasting out solar material from 1998 through 2020.

The SOHO spacecraft constantly stares at the sun, recording its every whim. It’s spectacular and mesmerizing.

“What becomes clear as the sun turns and years pass and background stars whirl by, is how constant the stream of material is that is blasted in all directions — the solar wind,” ESA said in a statement on Wednesday. “This constant wind is interrupted only by huge explosions that fling bows of material at vast speeds, filling the solar system with ionized material and solar radiation.”



a close up of a bright light: Two CMEs as seen by SOHO in 2000.


© ESA/NASA/SOHO

Two CMEs as seen by SOHO in 2000.


SOHO sports special telescopes (coronagraphs) that block out the face of the sun and capture views of coronal mass ejections. CMEs are wild outbursts of solar particles that can impact spacecraft, astronauts and even disrupt power grids on Earth.  

Read more

Hindu fury as Oxford University college offers Haribo Goldbears at a dinner to celebrate Diwali

Hindu fury as Oxford University college offers Haribo Goldbears sweets at a dinner to celebrate Diwali – even though they contain beef

  • Oxford college says sorry for offering Haribo Goldbears sweets at a Diwali dinner
  • Christ Church admitted the choice of sweet had not been ‘properly scrutinised’ 
  • Beef consumption conflicts with the Hindu faith as cows are considered sacred

It was the sugary treat that left a rather sour taste. One of Oxford University’s most prestigious colleges has apologised for offering Haribo Goldbears sweets at a dinner to celebrate the Hindu festival of Diwali – even though they contain beef.

The consumption of beef conflicts with the Hindu faith as cows are considered sacred, and angry students took to social media to criticise the blunder at Christ Church.

Writing on Oxfess, the university’s Facebook ‘confessions’ page, one said: ‘Pls just someone give more than five seconds thought to ‘minority’ students next time.’

While most of Haribo's UK products contain gelatine derived from pork, Halal products, such as its cola bottles, cherries and Goldbears, have a beef substitute

While most of Haribo’s UK products contain gelatine derived from pork, Halal products, such as its cola bottles, cherries and Goldbears, have a beef substitute

Another wrote: ‘The complete lack of thought that went into giving Haribos as a Diwali sweet is pretty appalling, even as someone who’s not religious.’

Diwali – a festival of lights celebrated by Hindus, Jains and Sikhs from mid-October to mid-November – is traditionally marked by the giving of sweets.

While most of Haribo’s UK products contain gelatine derived from pork, Halal products, such as its cola bottles, cherries and Goldbears, have a beef substitute.

Christ Church admitted last night that the choice of sweet had not been ‘properly scrutinised’.

A spokesman said: ‘Diwali celebrations at Christ Church are, in normal times, organised in conjunction with the students, but the usual arrangements were not in place this year because of the pandemic.

‘Unfortunately, the wrong sweets were provided at the first dinner as the ingredient list had not been properly scrutinised. We are sorry for any upset this may have caused.’

Earlier this year, the college, founded by Henry VIII in 1546, ordered staff and students to undergo training to combat racial bias, having introduced a compulsory anti-bias session as part of its induction programme.

Christ Church (pictured) admitted last night that the choice of sweet had not been 'properly scrutinised'

Christ Church (pictured) admitted last night that the choice of sweet had not been ‘properly scrutinised’

Advertisement

Source Article

Read more