University of Hawaii football team focused on cleaning up costly miscues

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Oklahoma Lottery director retires; team stays ‘hyper focused on funding education’ | Govt-and-politics

“That was all Rollo’s vision,” said David Ostrowe, who spent five years on the board, three as chairman, before being tapped as Gov. Kevin Stitt’s secretary of digital transformation and administration.

Ostrowe said the amount the agency was able to give to education immediately increased after the change.

The agency gives about $65 million a year to education.

Redburn has worked on improving the agency’s relationship with lawmakers after a rather rocky start.

“People used to run when they saw me coming,” he said about lawmakers. “Now, people call to ask for our opinion about bills and what we need to make the lottery better.”

He was also onboard when Oklahoma joined other multistate lotteries such as Powerball and Mega Millions.

He counts among his accomplishments getting 711 to come on board as a lottery partner. The agency in 2020 flipped a switch that turned on the lottery for 108 locations, he said.

He said a possible next step for the lottery is to expand into mobile platforms where players can buy tickets on their phones and a reward system where players earn points to the purchase of merchandise.

Ostrowe said the Oklahoma Lottery Commission is the most efficient state agency by far, spending far less on administration and overhead than other agencies.

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WGU Academy now an independent nonprofit focused on college readiness

New status gives Academy more flexibility to achieve its college readiness mission through partnering with other institutions and grant funding

WGU Academy—a largely independent operating unit of Western Governors University that was established in 2018—today announced that it is now a separate 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation. The Academy’s new status provides greater flexibility to pursue its mission of dramatically scaling college readiness solutions through service agreements and partnerships with other higher education institutions, K–12 schools, community groups, employers, and foundations.

WGU Academy began enrolling students in April 2019 and has already served over 10,000 individuals identified as needing additional preparation before enrolling full time into WGU. The Academy provides a low-risk and low-cost on-ramp to admission into WGU by providing transferable courses, but more importantly by developing students’ essential non-academic competencies: self-awareness and self-efficacy, a sense of belonging and growth mindset, and an increased capacity for ownership and accountability.

WGU Academy began pilot programs with other schools in 2019, and its new status allows the organization to more rapidly expand its ability to help students at community colleges and four-year institutions, in K–12 schools, through online summer bridge programs, and by helping employers develop the academic readiness of their employees—particularly frontline workers for whom postsecondary education is often perceived as out of reach.

“In addition to our ongoing work with WGU, our goal is to expand postsecondary access and equity for hundreds of thousands of students from underserved populations and to align with rapidly changing workforce needs,” said Pat Partridge, President of WGU Academy. “But access isn’t enough. We want to truly develop resilient learners, students who are equipped with the confidence, social and emotional skills, and mindset to reach their academic and career goals.”

Since launching in May 2018, the Academy has conducted pilot initiatives with tnAchieves in support of the Tennessee Promise Program, with Weber County (Utah) in support of an intergenerational poverty program, and with two K–12 districts in North Carolina to support seniors as they prepare to transition to postsecondary programs. The Academy’s staff has grown to over 50 employees to serve its growing enrollment and in preparation for supporting other organizations in the coming year.

“Students are facing tremendous stresses in the current environment,” Partridge said. “Students today must deal with COVID-19, a recession, and other stressors—including personal challenges—and success in college is tenuous at best for a lot of them. WGU Academy can help many students overcome these non-academic barriers.”

Whereas most college readiness efforts focus on remedial preparation for math and language skills, WGU Academy goes beyond that to include transferable college-level courses. More importantly, all students take the course Program for Academic and Career Advancement (PACA) to develop the mental and emotional characteristics of a resilient learner. Modeled on a nationally recognized course used by WGU for several years, PACA uses self-serve modules, group sessions, peer interaction, and one-to-one coaching to build confidence and persistence.

“Unlike traditional advising, which serves important roles,” Partridge said, “the Academy’s coaches and the PACA curriculum

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Half Way to Earth Day Celebration at Husson University Focused on Sustainability

Event paid tribute to the planet as part of Indigenous People’s Day

“We wanted to pay tribute to our beautiful planet as part of Indigenous People’s Day,” said Wynne Guglielmo, environmental, health and safety compliance officer at Husson University. “In addition to increasing environmental awareness, this event provided our students with an opportunity to contribute positively to our campus community.”

Halfway to Earth Day consisted of two separate activities. First, students participated in a campus cleanup and removed discarded waste from the campus grounds.

The second activity was a free e-waste drive that was open to students, staff, faculty and alumni. Individuals dropped off large CRTs (old-fashioned TV sets with cathode ray tubes), flat screen TVs, computer monitors, desktop printers, computer towers and laptops. Anyone who brought in one of these items was entered into a raffle for a Dunkin’ Donuts gift card.
“We wanted to pay tribute to our beautiful planet as part of Indigenous People’s Day,” said Wynne Guglielmo, environmental, health and safety compliance officer at Husson University. “In addition to increasing environmental awareness, this event provided our students with an opportunity to contribute positively to our campus community.” Halfway to Earth Day consisted of two separate activities. First, students participated in a campus cleanup and removed discarded waste from the campus grounds. The second activity was a free e-waste drive that was open to students, staff, faculty and alumni. Individuals dropped off large CRTs (old-fashioned TV sets with cathode ray tubes), flat screen TVs, computer monitors, desktop printers, computer towers and laptops. Anyone who brought in one of these items was entered into a raffle for a Dunkin’ Donuts gift card.
“We wanted to pay tribute to our beautiful planet as part of Indigenous People’s Day,” said Wynne Guglielmo, environmental, health and safety compliance officer at Husson University. “In addition to increasing environmental awareness, this event provided our students with an opportunity to contribute positively to our campus community.” Halfway to Earth Day consisted of two separate activities. First, students participated in a campus cleanup and removed discarded waste from the campus grounds. The second activity was a free e-waste drive that was open to students, staff, faculty and alumni. Individuals dropped off large CRTs (old-fashioned TV sets with cathode ray tubes), flat screen TVs, computer monitors, desktop printers, computer towers and laptops. Anyone who brought in one of these items was entered into a raffle for a Dunkin’ Donuts gift card.

BANGOR, MAINE, Oct. 20, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Native American culture has always had a deep and abiding respect for the land and its people.1 This culture’s approach to living in harmony with nature continues to resonate with many Americans as we face challenges brought on by pollution and global warming.

In accordance with Native Americans’ commitment to ecology and sustainability, Husson University hosted “Half Way to Earth Day” at their Bangor campus on Monday, October 12 from 12 p.m. (noon) to 4 p.m.

“We wanted to pay tribute to our beautiful planet as part of Indigenous People’s Day,” said Wynne Guglielmo, environmental, health and safety compliance officer at Husson University. “In addition to increasing environmental awareness, this event provided our students with an opportunity to contribute positively to our campus community.”

Halfway to Earth Day consisted of two separate activities. First, students participated in a campus cleanup and removed discarded waste from the campus grounds. In addition to helping Husson stay environmentally friendly, students had the opportunity to earn community service credits.

Community service is an important value at Husson University. Each student is required to complete 40 hours of service before he or she can graduate. This past year, graduates completed more than 15,000 hours of community service.

The second event was a free e-waste drive that was open to students,

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