UFC’s Devin Clark determined to get biggest career win on heels of family tragedy

UFC light heavyweight Devin Clark‘s training camp ahead of the biggest fight of his career hasn’t been easy.



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Clark fights former title challenger Anthony Smith in the co-main event of UFC on ESPN 18 on Saturday night in Las Vegas. This is the fist time Clark (12-4 MMA, 6-4 UFC) will fight in the co-main event of a UFC card during his four-year career with the company.

And ahead of such a big moment, Clark has also had to mourn the death of his mother-in-law, who was in hospice care before she passed away last week.

“To finish camp was super tough,” Clark told reporters Wednesday during UFC on ESPN 18 virtual media day. “To not just pack up my bags, go home, and hug my wife and my daughter and console them is one of the toughest things I’ve had to do as a husband, as a father, as a man.

“It’s a super difficult time, but with that being said, my whole family, we’re all in for this fight, including my mother-in-law. Before she passed, she gave me her blessing to pretty much go out there and beat up Anthony in the first round and finish him right away. She wanted me to stay and fight, and that’s what I’m doing. I also had my wife’s blessing, and my wife has been so tough through this whole thing and just handling it all on her own. It’s super incredible, and I’m super proud of her. We’re in this together.”

Video: Derek Brunson is asking for all of the big names in the UFC’s middleweight division (SMG)

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Lundin Family giving gift to University of Arizona to create interdisciplinary school of mining and mineral resources

VANCOUVER, BC, Oct. 29, 2020 /CNW/ – The Lundin Family is pleased to announce their support for an ambitious new expansion program at the school of mining and mineral resources at the University of Arizona.   The Lundin Family has made a US $2 million commitment and will provide up to an additional US $2.5 million through a grant challenge to match funds raised by December 2022.

The University of Arizona has long been recognized as having one of the top mining engineering programs in the world.  The Lundin Family gift will help the university upgrade facilities, provide financial support to students and work toward an interdisciplinary school of mining and mineral resources.

The program aims to encourage and prepare a new generation of professionals to enter the mining industry from different educational disciplines and specialties including finance, law, computer science, environment and social sciences, etc.

“We are very excited to be supporting such an important initiative alongside the University of Arizona. The drive toward a safer, more sustainable and efficient mining operation requires the very best talent across all disciplines, not just mining engineering and geology,” said Jack Lundin, President and CEO of Bluestone Resources Inc., one of the Lundin Group companies.

The Lundin Group comprises 14 publicly traded companies in the natural resource sector and operates in more than 25 countries around the world.

“While most universities’ mineral resources programs are shrinking or not keeping pace with change, the University of Arizona has demonstrated a vision and commitment to enhancing natural resources education. This gift is intended to catalyze the resources necessary and to attract industry support from our peers to make this vision of creating the best mineral resource program in the world into a reality,” Jack Lundin added. “We believe this partnership with the University of Arizona to create a new interdisciplinary school of mining and mineral resources will bring the kind of energy and excitement needed to attract the very best talent, and to prepare students to positively impact the future of mineral resources.”

Supplying the Best Possible Workforce

At the core of the expansion initiatives is an unwavering commitment to keeping the industry pipeline filled with well-rounded, highly skilled professionals. Thus, the University of Arizona’s College of Engineering, the College of Science, and the Lowell Institute are sharing the gift and working together to develop an interdisciplinary curriculum and update research and teaching facilities, such as the San Xavier Underground Mining Laboratory.

“We look forward to using this gift to become even better,” said David W. Hahn, the Craig M. Berge Dean of the College of Engineering. “The generosity of the Lundin family will allow us to upgrade our facilities, build partnerships with industry and other universities, and strengthen the department’s focus in areas such as data science and artificial intelligence.”

The Lundins are based in Canada and Switzerland, but the family maintains strong ties in Arizona and at the university. Jack earned a master’s degree in mining,

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The Grantecan finds the farthest black hole that belongs to a rare family of galaxies

The Grantecan finds the farthest black hole that belongs to a rare family of galaxies
Black-hole-powered galaxies called blazars are extremely rare. As matter falls toward the supermassive black hole at the galaxy’s center, some of it is accelerated outward at nearly the speed of light along jets pointed in opposite directions. When one of the jets happens to be aimed in the direction of Earth, as illustrated here, the galaxy appears especially bright and is classified as a blazar. Credit: M. Weiss/CfA

An international team of astronomers has identified one of the rarest known classes of gamma-ray emitting galaxies, called BL Lacertae, within the first 2 billion years of the age of the Universe. The team, that has used one of the largest optical telescope in the world, Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), located at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (Garafía, La Palma), consists of researchers from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM, Spain), DESY (Germany), University of California Riverside and Clemson University (USA). Their finding is published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.


Only a small fraction of galaxies emits gamma rays, which are the most extreme form of light. Astronomers believe that these highly energetic photons originate from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole residing at the centers of these galaxies. When this happens, they are known as active galaxies. The black hole swallows matter from its surroundings and emits jets or, in other words, collimated streams of matter and radiation. Few of these active galaxies (less than 1%) have their jets pointing by chance toward Earth. Scientists call them blazars and are one of the most powerful sources of radiation in the universe.

Blazars come in two flavors: BL Lacertae (BL Lac) and flat-spectrum radio-quasars (FSRQs). Our current understanding about these mysterious astronomical objects is that FSRQs are relatively young active galaxies, rich in dust and gas that surround the central black hole. As time passes, the amount of matter available to feed the black hole is consumed and the FSRQ evolves to become a BL Lac object. “In other words, BL Lacs may represent the elderly and evolved phase of a blazar’s life, while FSRQs resemble an adult,” explains Vaidehi Paliya, a DESY researcher who participated in this program.

“Since the speed of light is limited, the farther we look, the earlier in the age of the Universe we investigate,” says Alberto Domínguez of the Institute of Physics of Particles and the Cosmos (IPARCOS) at UCM and co-author of the study. Astronomers believe that the current age of the Universe is around 13.8 billion years. The most distant FSRQ was identified at a distance when the age of the universe was merely 1 billion years. For a comparison, the farthest BL Lac that is known was found when the age of the Universe was around 2.5 billion years. Therefore, the hypothesis of the evolution from FSRQ to BL Lacs appears to be valid.

Now, the team of international scientists has discovered a new BL Lac object, named 4FGL J1219.0+3653, much farther away than the previous record holder. “We

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Colby College receives $2 million family gift for new arts, athletics centers

Colby College announced Tuesday that a multi-generational Waterville family with ties to the school is donating $2 million to support landmark arts and athletics initiatives.

Dana L. Schmaltz and Kate Enroth’s donation will name the Colby College Museum of Art’s gallery in the Paul J. Schupf Art Center in honor of Joan Dignam Schmaltz, Colby class of 1963. In addition, the welcome pavilion at the new Harold Alfond Athletics and Recreation Center will be named for Richard R. “Dick” Schmaltz, Colby class of 1962.

“Where we are in our stage with our relationship with Waterville is that this should be positive, mutually beneficial and eternal,” Colby College President David A. Greene said in a phone interview Tuesday. “This should not be something that ends in the next couple years or has a timeline on it It should be an ongoing commitment for Colby to have a partnership with Waterville.”

Joan Dignam was an artist. Dick Schmaltz was known as “Mr. Colby” to friends and family. In partnership with Waterville Creates!, Colby is developing the Paul J. Schupf Art Center on Main Street in downtown Waterville, which will break ground in 2021. The Joan Dignam Schmaltz Gallery of Art will contain exhibitions from the museum’s permanent collection as well as specially commissioned shows.

“The Schmaltz and Dignam families, much like our family, have a long and proud history in Waterville and at Colby. We all share a dedication to this community, and we can’t think of a more fitting tribute to our dear friends Dick and Joan than the naming of these two spaces in their honor,” said Paula Lunder, D.F.A. ’98 and Peter Lunder ’56, D.F.A. ’98 in a release.

A rendering of an interior space in the future Arts Collaborative building on Main Street in Waterville. Construction on the project is starting this week, Colby College announced on Wednesday. Peter and Paula Lunder are financing almost half of the $6.5 million project, designed by architect Ryan Senatore. The building is expected to be complete by April 2021. Rendering by James Reben, Architectural Image Solutions

The art gallery is one of a handful of efforts by Colby to revitalize Waterville’s downtown. The Bill & Joan Alfond Main Street Commons, which opened in the fall of 2018, houses more than 200 students in downtown Waterville. The Lockwood Mills Hotel, which is currently housing students, will eventually open to the public. The Colby Arts Collaborative on 14 and 20 Main St. is set to open in April of 2021. Waterville’s BUILD grant also makes a difference.

“We’re hitting an inflection point where a number of the major projects are either under construction or will be soon, and over the next few years we’ll see these coming in a consistent fashion,” Greene said. “What’s also important is also all of the activity that is going on that is stimulated by these investments, but not directly related to them.”

Greene alluded to the efforts by others outside of Colby as part of the overall

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Family of slain Utah college student confronts her killer

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Family members of a Utah college student who was found strangled and burned last year following a search for her that captured the nation’s attention called the man who pleaded guilty to her murder a “monster” Friday as they confronted him before he was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.



FILE - In this July 1, 2019, file photo, Ashley Fine speaks during a vigil for Mackenzie Lueck at the university in Salt Lake City. A tech worker pleaded guilty Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, in the death of Lueck, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ayoola A. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. (Jeremy Harmon/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this July 1, 2019, file photo, Ashley Fine speaks during a vigil for Mackenzie Lueck at the university in Salt Lake City. A tech worker pleaded guilty Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, in the death of Lueck, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ayoola A. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. (Jeremy Harmon/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)

Mackenzie Lueck’s father, Gregory Lueck, told Ayoola A. Ajayi that he had no compassion for him because Ajayi had showed no compassion for his daughter, and said he hopes Ajayi spends the rest of his life in prison looking over his shoulder in fear.

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Ajayi has acknowledged he planned the death of the 23-year-old Lueck, whom he met on a dating app and arranged to meet in a park. After they returned to his home, he bound and strangled her, then burned and hid her body while police and loved ones searched for her, authorities say.

“I’m not sure you even have anything to look forward to in the afterlife, if you believe in that,” Gregory Lueck said. “My daughter Mackenzie Lueck was a sweet, amazing young lady with the world ahead of her. She was a kindhearted person that cared about others. Now, I will not have the opportunity to see her blossom in life.”

Her cousin, Carly Stevens, said through tears: “This is a nightmare you can’t wake up from. I will never be able to forgive what happened to her. I will never forgive the monster who took her life. Never in my life have I felt anger the way I have the last 16 months. Never have I been so fearful for my life because I know how real evil is in this world.”



FILE - In this Dec. 20, 2019, file photo, Ayoola A. Ajayi appears in 3rd District Court in Salt Lake City. Ajayi pleaded guilty in the death of a Utah college student Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole in the death of 23-year-old Mackenzie Lueck. (Jeffrey D. Allred/The Deseret News via AP, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Dec. 20, 2019, file photo, Ayoola A. Ajayi appears in 3rd District Court in Salt Lake City. Ajayi pleaded guilty in the death of a Utah college student Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, more than a year after her disappearance sparked a large-scale search that ended with the discovery of her charred remains in his backyard. Ajayi is expected to be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole in the death of 23-year-old Mackenzie Lueck. (Jeffrey D. Allred/The Deseret News via AP, File)

The Lueck family had not said much publicly since their daughter’s charred remains were found in the summer of 2019 in Ajayi’s backyard in Salt

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University of Utah settles with family

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Lauren McCluskey, a senior majoring in communication, was shot and killed Monday night at the University of Utah. (Photo: Steve C. Wilson, University of Utah)

The University of Utah reached a $13.5 million settlement Thursday with the parents of Lauren McCluskey, a student who was killed by her ex-boyfriend on campus two years ago, and acknowledged that her death was preventable. 

The university will pay the McCluskeys $10.5 million and make $3 million donation to the Lauren McCluskey Foundation that is designed to improve campus safety and help collegiate track athletes and animal shelters. The family has said all the money will go to the foundation.

“This settlement is important for many reasons,” Jill McCluskey said at a press conference Thursday. “It addresses how Lauren died, but it also honors how she lived.”

The university also acknowledged in the settlement that it didn’t handle McCluskey’s case properly and that her death was a “brutal, senseless and preventable tragedy.”

“We failed Lauren and her family,” University of Utah President Ruth Watkins said at a press conference Thursday. “If these employees had more complete training and protocols to guide their responses, the university believes they would have been better equipped to protect Lauren.”

McCluskey, a 21-year-old member of the school’s track team, had contacted campus police more than 20 times to report she was being harassed by 37-year-old Melvin Shawn Rowland. McCluskey had ended their relationship when she discovered he had lied about his name, age and status as a sex offender.

She was found shot dead in a car near on-campus student housing in October 2018. Rowland died by suicide after the attack as police tracked him down.

Watkins said in December 2018 that she hadn’t found anything in an initial review of the case to indicate McCluskey’s death could have been prevented. A report commissioned by the university later found officers made several missteps and failed to recognize warning signs, and it offered dozens of recommendations for improvement.

From May: Police chief orders investigation after officer allegedly shared explicit photos of woman later killed by ex-boyfriend

Jill and Matt McCluskey filed a $56 million lawsuit against the university in 2019 that claimed the college was negligent in failing to protect their daughter.

As part of the settlement, the university will also name the newly launched Center for Violence Prevention after McCluskey. The school will also raise money to build an indoor track facility that will bear her name.

Contributing: The Associated Press

Follow N’dea Yancey-Bragg on Twitter: @NdeaYanceyBragg

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University of Utah settles with family of murdered student Lauren McCluskey and renames its violence prevention center in her honor

The University of Utah has settled two lawsuits with the parents of Lauren McCluskey, a 21-year-old student who was killed by an ex-boyfriend she had complained about to police more than 20 times.



Sadie Feighan looking at the camera: Lauren McCluskey


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Lauren McCluskey

McCluskey’s body was found in the back seat of a car on campus two years ago. She had been shot and killed by 37-year-old Melvin Rowland, a convicted sex offender who had spent more than a decade in prison. He killed himself hours later after a police chase, university police had said.

Lauren McCluskey’s parents, Jill and Matt McCluskey, filed a $56 million lawsuit last year alleging the University of Utah had failed to protect their daughter.

“The university acknowledges and deeply regrets that it did not handle Lauren’s case as it should have and that, at the time, its employees failed to fully understand and respond appropriately to Lauren’s situation,” University of Utah President Ruth Watkins said in a statement on Thursday.

“As a result, we failed Lauren and her family.”

The university will pay the McCluskeys $10.5 million and make a charitable donation of $3 million to the Lauren McCluskey Foundation.

The university also said it has also been making improvements to campus safety after the death, including implementing new policies and trainings and adding a new shuttle service.

University: McCluskey’s murder was ‘preventable tragedy’

McCluskey and Rowland had met at a bar and dated for about a month. When McCluskey learned Rowland had a criminal conviction, and had lied about his age and name, she ended the relationship.

Over the course of the next two weeks, she called campus police a number of times to report he was sending her harassing messages, as well as attempting to extort money from her. She told police she sent $1,000 to an account in the hopes of keeping compromising photos of her private, according to a review of the incident.

Audio from McCluskey’s 911 calls to Salt Lake City Police show that she was increasingly frustrated by the pace of the university investigation.

The university said in the settlement “that the murder of Lauren McCluskey was a brutal, senseless, and preventable tragedy and acknowledges the unspeakable loss the McCluskey family has suffered and continues to suffer.”

‘Hope for the future’

As part of the settlement, the University of Utah said it will raise funds to construct an indoor track facility that will be named after Lauren McCluskey, who was a track athlete at the school.

The university will also rename the newly launched Center for Violence Prevention as the McCluskey Center for Violence Prevention.

“We share with the McCluskeys an interest in working to improve safety for all students, not only on our campus but on campuses across the country. With our commitment to learning from our mistakes, we honor Lauren and ensure her legacy will be improved campus safety for all students,” Watkins said.

As part of the campus safety improvements, the university has also consolidated evening classes in

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Slain Utah college student’s family gets $13.5M settlement

Brady Mccombs, Associated Press
Published 8:22 p.m. ET Oct. 22, 2020

Salt Lake City – The parents of a University of Utah track athlete who was killed by her ex-boyfriend on campus two years ago reached a $13.5 million settlement Thursday with the university, which acknowledged that it didn’t handle the woman’s case properly.

University of Utah President Ruth Watkins and the parents of Lauren McCluskey announced the settlement at a joint news conference in Salt Lake City that came on the second anniversary of her death. The case brought new national attention to campus safety and dating-violence issues at universities, spurring several changes at the University of Utah.

McCluskey, 21 of Pullman, Washington, had contacted university police more than 20 times to report harassment by the man she had dated before she was found fatally shot in a car near on-campus student housing in October 2018

“We failed Lauren and her family,” Watkins said. “If these employees had more complete training and protocols to guide their responses, the university believes they would have been better equipped to protect Lauren.”

That marked a shift from what Watkins said back in December 2018 when she said that she hadn’t found anything in an initial review of the case to indicate McCluskey’s death could have been prevented.

Jill and Matt McCluskey bristled at those comments and sued the university in 2019, seeking $56 million while claiming the college was negligent in failing to protect their daughter.

An independent review commissioned by the university found multiple missed warning signs before Lauren McCluskey was killed by 37-year-old Melvin Shawn Rowland after she dumped him because she discovered he had been lying about his name, age and status as a sex offender. Rowland took his own life after the attack as police tracked him down.

The university will pay the McCluskeys $10.5 million and give another $3 million to a foundation founded in their daughter’s name that is designed to improve campus safety, as well as help collegiate track athletes and animal shelters. An indoor track facility will also be built and named after Lauren McCluskey as part of the settlement.

The McCluskeys said all the money will go to the Lauren McCluskey foundation.

“This settlement is important for many reasons,” Jill McCluskey said. “It addresses how Lauren died, but it also honors how she lived.”

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Family of murdered college athlete Lauren McCluskey settles with University of Utah for $13.5 million

Lauren McCluskey was killed by her ex-boyfriend in October 2018.

Two years to the day after the brutal murder of University of Utah athlete Lauren McCluskey, her parents, Jill and Matt McCluskey, and the university announced a $10.5 million settlement in a lawsuit against the school. In addition, the school will donate $3 million to the Lauren McCluskey Foundation.

“The university acknowledges and deeply regrets that it did not handle Lauren’s case as it should have and that, at the time, its employees failed to fully understand and respond appropriately to Lauren’s situation,” University of Utah President Ruth V. Watkins said during a press conference held Thursday. “As a result, we have failed Lauren and her family. If these employees had more complete training and protocols to guide their responses, the university believes they would have been better equipped to protect Lauren.”

Lauren McCluskey was found dead in a parked car near a residential hall on campus in October 2018. Melvin Rowland, McCluskey’s former boyfriend, allegedly shot and killed her before killing himself the same night.

McCluskey, 21, had reported to the university police that Rowland, 37, was harassing and stalking her. McCluskey ended their brief relationship after learning he was a registered sex offender who lied about his identity and criminal history, including a 2004 conviction of enticing a minor, police said.

The settlement comes after the McCluskeys filed a second lawsuit in June saying the university violated the state constitution. The complaint states in the weeks leading up to Lauren’s murder, she was being “sexually and physically abused, stalked and threatened by her killer” and that the police “dismissed and avoided her requests for help.”

PHOTO: Jill McCluskey, the mother of slain University of Utah student-athlete Lauren McCluskey, speaks during a press conference announcing they have reached a settlement in their lawsuit against the university Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020, in Salt Lake City.

Jill McCluskey, the mother of slain University of Utah student-athlete Lauren McCluskey, speaks during a press conference announcing they have reached a settlement in their lawsuit against the university Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020, in Salt Lake City.

Lauren and her friends reported incidents of abusive behavior to university officials in addition to their fears of violence, according to the complaint. The complaint also states the university officials dismissed her requests for help.

In an interview with ABC News in January 2019, her parents said the university did not take Lauren’s complaints seriously.

“They seemed to show no curiosity about this person who had lied about his age, his name, his … he was a sex offender,” Matt McCluskey told ABC News. “And then they found out that he’s also a felon.”

“They should’ve investigated,” her father added. “They would’ve very quickly found his parole status in one call and it would … we wouldn’t be sitting here today.”

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Family of slain University of Utah athlete Lauren McCluskey reach $13.5M settlement with school

The family of slain University of Utah track athlete Lauren McCluskey has reached a $13.5 million settlement with the school.



a group of people playing football on a field: Family of slain University of Utah athlete Lauren McCluskey reach $13.5M settlement with school


© Ethan Miller/Getty Images
Family of slain University of Utah athlete Lauren McCluskey reach $13.5M settlement with school

The settlement was announced Thursday, which was the second anniversary of her death. University of Utah President Ruth Watkins said the school “acknowledges and deeply regrets that it did not handle Lauren’s case as it should have.”

Under the settlement, the state of Utah will pay the McCluskeys $10.5 million by March 31. The University will contribute $3 million to the Lauren McCluskey Foundation by the same date.

The school also pledged to build an indoor track facility that will have her name by Dec. 31, 2030. If the facility is not finished by that time, then the school will make an additional $3 million contribution to the foundation no later than June 30, 2031.

The university also will rename its Center for Violence Prevention as the McCluskey Center for Violence Prevention.

“We share with the McCluskeys an interest in working to improve safety for all students, not only on our campus but on campuses across the country,” Watkins said Thursday. “With our commitment to learning from our mistakes, we honor Lauren and ensure her legacy will be improved campus safety for all students.”

Melvin Rowland, the man McCluskey dated for just a few weeks, kidnapped and shot McCluskey seven times in October 2018 before taking his own life.

Two months after her death, Watkins said that an internal review hadn’t found anything to suggest that her death could have been prevented.

McCluskey’s family filed a suit in June, alleging that before her death, she turned over photographs Rowland used to blackmail her to officer Miguel Deras, who McCluskey’s parents claim saved the images and shared them with other officers.

Deras’s attorney told KSL NewsRadio in May that the allegations were “absolutely untrue.”

The McCluskeys filed a separate lawsuit for civil rights allegations, claiming that their daughter’s case was treated differently due to her gender. The family sought $56 million for both suits.

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