Humanoid Robotics to enhance STEM Education via. EZ JD in Wales

By Jayesh Saini and Dr. Esyin Chew, EUREKA Robotics Lab, Cardiff School of Technologies, Cardiff Metropolitan University

School Holiday and Enrichment Programme from First Campus with EUREKA Robotics Lab (St Teilo's Church in Wales): High School teacher, Students, Jayesh (top right) and Esyin (bottom left)

Nowadays, robotics can be the mean of present and future education revolution. All 21st Century learners need to understand the Fourth Industrialization (Robotics and AI) to make us adaptable to the drastic change in our job roles in what is coming up. As children are the forthcoming human labor’s in the next Industrialization, educators need to assure that they receive comprehensive and cutting edge education which will not only make our career bright but overall it creates a sustainability for the future generations to grow in terms of knowledge and technology. Education Department of the UK Parliament has published both oral and written evidence from the national expert views on how the national leaders and education policymakers should respond to the Fourth Industrialization. As one of the flagship research clusters at the Cardiff School of Technologies, EUREKA Robotics Lab have implemented the 4-steps framework for University-Schools engagement across Wales to deliver STEM workshop at schools through robotics with yearly robotics competition award ceremony. The three-dimensional printable JD Robots are the key applied AI technologies we use.

EZ JD with Jayesh in EUREKA Robotics Lab, Cardiff School of Technologies, Cardiff Metropolitan University

We all know that, robots will form a significant part of our life’s in the coming future, so even, a single piece of information that helps us in understanding them easily or in lay man’s terms that is understandable to everyone will be beneficial for us then, there would be no fear of robots as we think that they will create in future which overall makes the whole future generation future proof ready. As the next revolution is based on AI (Artificial Intelligence), we would assert that education policymakers need to include these subjects in the formal curriculum of the primary education in simplest of terms so that it is easily understandable to anyone irrespective of their educational background. Currently, EUREKA Robotics lab and our STEM education outreach programme are popular across Wales for schools’ robotics and AI workshops, not merely within the schools’ Science Weeks or STEM weeks, and the UK Saturday Science Clubs. However, in order to embed that formally into the daily curriculum is the next big step we are working with policymakers and leaders in Wales. There are many educational robots exhibited in the recent BETT London. We would suggest that not all “educational robots” exhibited in BETT are worthwhile be included in formal curriculum. Some are merely too costly for schools to afford or too simple to teach the complexity of robotics and AI. Currently, EUREKA Robotics Lab use a few robots 3D printable robots, Robot Baby Newton, JD and Nao Robots for STEM workshops across schools.

Currently, there are lots of robots in the commercial market which helps in enhancing robotics education but EZ JD robots takes an edge over all of them by making robotics education as easy to understand as possible which means it resembles humans i.e., human like interactions. In terms of JD, it is a humanoid robot

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Scientists call for decade of concerted effort to enhance understanding of the deep seas

Scientists call for decade of concerted effort to enhance understanding of the deep seas
A close-up image of a bamboo coral called Acanella arbuscula taken from ~1000m deep in the North East Atlantic Credit: NERC funded Deep Links Project (University of Plymouth, Oxford University, JNCC, BGS)

The deep seas—vast expanses of water and seabed hidden more than 200 meters below the ocean surface to depths up to 11,000 meters—are recognized globally as an important frontier of science and discovery.


But despite the fact they account for around 60% of Earth’s surface area, large areas remain completely unexplored, yet the habitats they support impact on the health of the entire planet.

Now an international team of scientists, spanning 45 institutions in 17 countries, has called for a dedicated decade-long program of research to greatly advance discovery in these remote regions.

The program—which scientists have named Challenger 150—will coincide with the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, which runs from 2021-2030.

Challenger 150 will generate new geological, physical, biogeochemical, and biological data through a global cooperative of science and innovation, including the application of new technology. These data will be used to understand how changes in the deep sea impact the wider ocean and life on the planet.

Among its key areas of focus are to build greater capacity and diversity in the scientific community, acknowledging the fact that existing deep-sea research is conducted primarily by developed nations with access to resources and infrastructure.

The program will use this new knowledge of the deep to support regional, national, and international decision-making on deep-sea issues such as mining, hydrocarbon extraction, fishing, climate mitigation, laying of fiber optic cables and conservation.

The international team presented the rationale behind the call for action in a comment article in Nature Ecology and Evolution, simultaneously publishing a detailed blueprint of how the actions can be best achieved in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Led by members of the Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI) and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), the authorship reflects both the gender and geographical diversity such a program demands, with authors from the six inhabited continents of the world.

They note that the UN Decade provides an unrivaled opportunity to unite the international science community to deliver a giant leap in our knowledge of the deep seas.

Scientists call for decade of concerted effort to enhance understanding of the deep seas
An outcrop of rock makes a perfect home for many different cold water coral species Credit: NERC funded Deep Links Project (University of Plymouth, Oxford University, JNCC, BGS)

Kerry Howell, Professor of Deep-Sea Ecology at the University of Plymouth (UK) and lead author of the research publications, said: “The deep seas and seabed are increasingly being used by society, and they are seen as a potential future asset for the resources they possess. But managing these resources sustainably requires that we first understand deep-sea ecosystems and their role in our planet, its people and its atmosphere. Our vision is for a 10 year program of science and discovery that is global in scale and targeted towards proving the science to inform decisions around deep-ocean use. We

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Researchers prove titanate nanotubes composites enhance photocatalysis of hydrogen

Researchers prove titanate nanotubes composites enhance photocatalysis of hydrogen
The titanate nanotubes (TNTs) composites enhanced the photocatalytic selectivity for H2 generation from formic acid better than Pt/TiO2. In addition, intensified electronic interactions occur between the components of TNTs and the Pt atoms in terms of the strong metal-support interaction, consequently influencing the behavior of photocatalysts. Therefore, the photocatalyst formed by Pt and TNTs has higher photocatalytic performance than TiO2 from a 20% v/v methanol solution under UV and visible light irradiation. Credit: World Scientific Publishing

In a paper published in NANO, researchers from National Taiwan University examined the photocatalytic performances of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) against commonly-used titanium dioxide (TiO2) and discovered superior performance of TNTs.


In the study, TiO2 was used as a reference support compared with TNTs synthesized by a facile method. The results showed that Platinum (Pt/)TNTs fabricated using the microwave heating process enhanced the hydrogen evolution from methanol to a greater extent than Pt/TiO2. The high surface area of TNTs can improve adsorption of methanol on the active site and prevent the formation of agglomerated fine Pt particles.

Additionally, the high surface area led to an increased contact area between Pt and Ti atoms, which enhanced the strong metal-support interaction and increased H2 production performance. This is due to the absorption spectra of TNTs shifting toward the visible light region to a greater extent after loading Pt, thereby improving the selectivity of formic acid decomposition to CO2. Therefore, Pt/TNTs, which have considerably high photocatalytic efficiency, are viable in further applications as promising photocatalysts.

The titanate nanotubes (TNTs) composites enhanced the photocatalytic selectivity for H2 generation from formic acid better than Pt/TiO2. In addition, intensified electronic interactions occur between the components of TNTs and the Pt atoms in terms of the strong metal-support interaction, consequently influencing the behavior of photocatalysts. Therefore, the photocatalyst formed by Pt and TNTs has higher photocatalytic performance than TiO2 from a 20% v/v methanol solution under UV and visible light irradiation.

TNTs offer higher active surface area than TiO2 nanoparticles. The high surface area provides short diffusion paths for electrons and holes, prompting them to transfer to the surface and reducing the recombination of electrons and holes. Also, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) results of the paper showed negative shifts of the Pt binding energies and positive shifts of Ti binding energies due to the strong metal-support interaction between Pt and TNTs. Thus, the remarkably high photocatalytic efficiency of TNT composites facilitates their application as promising photocatalysts.

Besides, it is worth noting that one mole of HCOOH decomposes into one mole of CO2 and one mole of H2, or one mole of CO and one mole of H2O. Thus, it is important to increase the selectivity of formic acid decomposition for CO2 evolution. The results show bare TNTs and Pt/TNTs resulted in lower CO generation than bare TiO2 and Pt/TiO2. This result may be attributed to

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Could Texas A&M make the College Football Playoff? Big wins, less daunting remaining schedule enhance Aggies’ odds

The most encouraging news for Texas A&M on Sunday wasn’t the Aggies’ rise to No. 7 in the AP Top 25.

It was the unranked state of every other team remaining on the schedule. Auburn and Tennessee dropped from the AP Top 25.

The College Football Playoff speculation that bubbled up after A&M (3-1) got its first win at Mississippi State on Saturday got a little more plausible. Imagine the Aggies running the table in the regular season and finishing 9-1 and perhaps claiming a second spot for the SEC in the playoff – ahead of, say, the Big 12 champion.

Hmmm.

Yes, it’s way too early to play connect the dots. The first college football playoff rankings won’t be released this year until Nov. 24. Plenty could go wrong between now and then in the SEC minefield, even if the A&M schedule looks less daunting with Alabama and Florida in the rear-view mirror. Arkansas is far different now under first-year coach Sam Pittman.

For now, you can make a case for A&M if it finishes 9-1.

Assume Alabama runs the table and wins another SEC West title – which may not be much of an assumption – and add a Florida win over Georgia to win the SEC East. Alabama hands Florida a loss in the SEC title game and A&M would have the second-best resume in the conference.

Pencil in spots for the ACC champ (Clemson, very probably) and the Big Ten champ (Ohio State, ditto) and there would be one spot remaining in the four-team playoff.

No. 6 Oklahoma State is the only remaining undefeated team in the Big 12 and rounding into form after a slow start. The Cowboys have the skill position talent and a veteran defense. Will that be enough to beat No. 17 Iowa State (3-1) this week in Stillwater? And can Oklahoma State end a five-game losing streak to Bedlam rival Oklahoma?

Even if Oklahoma State survives, no one knows how the playoff selection committee views a conference that didn’t exactly distinguish itself in its abbreviated non-conference slate.

Plus, there could be other contenders potentially vying with the Aggies and Big 12 champs.

Notre Dame could emerge as a second team from the ACC as could Wisconsin or Penn State in the Big Ten. Maybe BYU or SMU could give the group of five a contender.

Only once, during the 2017 season, the selection committee picked two teams from the same conference – Georgia and Alabama.

For now, A&M isn’t thinking beyond the bye week and Arkansas.

“We’ve got a lot of work to do,” coach Jimbo Fisher said. “We’re nowhere close to where we can be.”

Two weeks into the season, the Aggies were being buried by the same media types praising them now. Things are different now, including A&M developing an identity as a power running team behind an experienced and nasty offensive line. It’s not necessarily sexy but it can be effective.

“Their offensive line does a great job

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