Retiring Editorial Cartoonist Reflects On 50-Year Career : NPR

NPR’s Michel Martin speaks with Washington Post editorial cartoonist Tom Toles, who is retiring after a 50-year career.



MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For 50 years, Tom Toles has been working as an editorial cartoonist, including almost two decades at The Washington Post, where he took over from the legendary cartoonist Herblock in 2002. Now Tom Toles has announced that he is retiring from the Post next week after a long and eventful career at the paper afflicting the comfortable and hopefully offering some comfort to the afflicted. So we wanted to take a look back at his career as well as at some of the rewards and challenges of the work that he does. And Tom Toles is with us now.

Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us.

TOM TOLES: Hi, Michel. Very nice to be with you.

MARTIN: You’ve written a final cartoon, which you were nice enough to share with us. It starts out by saying, I started out 50 years ago at my college newspaper as a long-haired liberal and half a century later as a long-haired liberal (laughter).

TOLES: Yeah. There was a little time in there when I had kids that I looked more like a regular person. I thought I had to, you know, present a little differently. But as soon as they were out of the house, I grew my hair back again and feel much more like myself.

MARTIN: Well, but your views haven’t changed. Your worldview hasn’t changed. Your values didn’t change.

TOLES: In terms of the way I look at the world, no, it hasn’t. I mean, the value system is the bedrock. The policies come and go. They get shaded by different eras and different presidencies, different whole sets of arguments that these change over time. And you see them all a little differently, but you see them always through that same lens of, what do I think makes for a just society? And so that’s always pretty much stayed the same.

MARTIN: It’s interesting that political cartooning is in the news right now as we speak, in part because, you know, yet again, the Charlie Hebdo cartoons in France have sparked this, you know, tremendous – both a reaction and a counterreaction.

I mean, it’s been a hugely traumatic experience with cartoons that were drawn by a satirical magazine in France were strongly objected to by some people who actually killed people at the magazine. And then there was another death recently. And then there’s been a reaction to that, with some people saying that they are showing insensitivity and other people saying that, you know, obviously, this is an attack on free speech. But it’s been a very traumatic event.

And I was just curious, though – over the span of your career, has it ever been that way before, where political cartooning itself has been something of a subject of kind of debate and sort of social interest?

TOLES: Yeah. I mean, the nature of political

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Editorial: 5 candidates to lead Charleston schools through pivotal moment in education | Editorials

The pandemic interrupted every aspect of our lives, probably none more than our schools, which had to convert literally overnight into remote learning centers, and then navigate questions about when and how to allow students back into the classroom.

Those challenges will continue as infection rates rise through the fall and winter, and then a whole host of new questions will arise once a vaccine is available. Yet even when COVID-19 is a memory, we will be left with the problems that have long plagued Charleston County School District: We have some of the best schools in the state and nation, and more than our share of the worst, and by and large the worst schools are filled with students who are poor and black, while the best are filled with students who are much better off and white.



Editorial: What makes sense, what doesn't in Charleston schools overhaul

The district’s “mission critical” actions were designed to improve education for poor kids without losing the support of the better-off parents who have the resources to send their children to private schools and whose support is critical to maintaining the district’s political and financial support in the community. They involve better early childhood education programs, merging too-small schools, focusing extra attention on the worst-performing schools and increasing diversity in the best schools.

These actions were never perfect, and there’s plenty of room to rethink some of the changes. But we can’t afford to abandon the whole concept, as some candidates want to do.

READ THE CANDIDATES ANSWERS to our questionnaires at postandcourier.com/opinion/election2020/

At this pivotal moment, we need school board members who can help guide us through the end of the pandemic and see the mission-critical concept through.

We believe the candidates who are best equipped for and committed to doing this are Charles Monteith and Courtney Waters for the two North Charleston seats, Lauren Herterich for the downtown Charleston seat, and Chris Fraser and Hunter Schimpff for the two seats that represent West Ashley, James Island, Johns Island and Ravenel. (We recognize that the Charleston Coalition for Kids reached the same conclusions about the candidates, a fact that in no way changes our belief that the organization needs to come clean with the public about who’s funding its TV ads supporting them.)



Editorial: Charleston Coalition for Kids needs to come clean with the public

North Charleston seats



MonteithCharles

Charles Monteith


Charles Monteith served four years on the District 4 Constituent Board and over the past year on the committee that vetted proposals by nonprofits to operate underachieving schools under contract with the district. He believes the approach he uses as a software quality-assurance professional can improve the learning process, for instance increasing early literacy education and giving teachers more autonomy. Like critics of public-school choice programs, he says the district’s priority must be making every neighborhood school excellent; unlike those critics, he recognizes that “traditional models of school reform may not be able to provide a more dynamic, innovative approach” quickly enough. He believes the district’s immediate priority should be reversing the learning loss from the COVID-19 school disruptions

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Tulsa World editorial: Rep. Jadine Nollan shows consistency in support of public education | Opinion



Construction program tour

State Rep. Jadine Nollan, Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell and Superintendent Sherry Durkee visit the Interior Design classroom at Charles Page High School September 5.




Rep. Jadine Nollan wasn’t sure she would get another term in office after she voted for a tax package to fund public school pay raises two years ago.

She did it anyway, going against high pressure anti-tax, anti-education lobbying efforts.

It was a rare act of political courage in the state Capitol, and enough to earn our continued support.

In her four terms representing House District 66, Nollan has been a consistent supporter of public schools, even when doing so wasn’t popular in her own caucus.

Nollan pushed the legislation for the Individual Career Academic Plans as part of graduation requirements. This program helps break down silos of higher education, career tech programs and workforce needs.

She fought to expand concurrent enrollment for high school seniors and juniors at state colleges and wants to grow business internship programs for students.

Her background as an 11-year Sand Springs school board member and executive director of the Sand Springs Community Services nonprofit show. She’s a pro-education, public-minded Republican conservative.

District 66 is a unique constituency. In a miracle of gerrymandering, it includes homeless encampments along the Arkansas River, suburban parts of Sand Springs and much of Tulsa’s fashionable Maple Ridge. Most of the registered voters are Republican, although Democrats held the seat for decades prior to Nollan.

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Tulsa World editorial: Rep. Jadine Nollan shows consistency in support of public education (copy) | Opinion



Construction program tour

State Rep. Jadine Nollan, Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell and Superintendent Sherry Durkee visit the Interior Design classroom at Charles Page High School September 5.




Rep. Jadine Nollan wasn’t sure she would get another term in office after she voted for a tax package to fund public school pay raises two years ago. 

She did it anyway, going against high pressure anti-tax, anti-education lobbying efforts.

It was a rare act of political courage in the state Capitol, and enough to earn our continued support.

In her four terms representing House District 66, Nollan has been a consistent supporter of public schools, even when doing so wasn’t popular in her own caucus. 

Nollan pushed the legislation for the Individual Career Academic Plans as part of graduation requirements. This program helps break down silos of higher education, career tech programs and workforce needs. 

She fought to expand concurrent enrollment for high school seniors and juniors at state colleges and wants to grow business internship programs for students.

Her background as an 11-year Sand Springs school board member and executive director of the Sand Springs Community Services nonprofit show. She’s a pro-education, public-minded Republican conservative. 

District 66 is a unique constituency. In a miracle of gerrymandering, it includes homeless encampments along the Arkansas River, suburban parts of Sand Springs and much of Tulsa’s fashionable Maple Ridge. Most of the registered voters are Republican, although Democrats held the seat for decades prior to Nollan.

Source Article

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Tulsa World editorial: Rep. Jadine Nollan shows consistency in support of public education | Editorial



Construction program tour

State Rep. Jadine Nollan, Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell and Superintendent Sherry Durkee visit the Interior Design classroom at Charles Page High School September 5.




Rep. Jadine Nollan wasn’t sure she would get another term in office after she voted for a tax package to fund public school pay raises two years ago.

She did it anyway, going against high pressure anti-tax, anti-education lobbying efforts.

It was a rare act of political courage in the state Capitol, and enough to earn our continued support.

In her four terms representing House District 66, Nollan has been a consistent supporter of public schools, even when doing so wasn’t popular in her own caucus.

Nollan pushed the legislation for the Individual Career Academic Plans as part of graduation requirements. This program helps break down silos of higher education, career tech programs and workforce needs.

She fought to expand concurrent enrollment for high school seniors and juniors at state colleges and wants to grow business internship programs for students.

Her background as an 11-year Sand Springs school board member and executive director of the Sand Springs Community Services nonprofit show. She’s a pro-education, public-minded Republican conservative.

District 66 is a unique constituency. In a miracle of gerrymandering, it includes homeless encampments along the Arkansas River, suburban parts of Sand Springs and much of Tulsa’s fashionable Maple Ridge. Most of the registered voters are Republican, although Democrats held the seat for decades prior to Nollan.

Source Article

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