University of Denver Ready to Drop Puck on New Season

In a year that has been anything but ordinary and plagued by many unfortunate firsts, the University of Denver hockey team is embarking this week on a first of its own. Following the strategy of both the NHL and the NBA, the National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC) is beginning the season in a “pod” to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. In pod play, the conference’s eight teams will be limited to playing each other for the first leg of the season.

“It’s going to be unlike anything we have ever done,” says David Carle, the Richard and Kitzia Goodman Head Coach. “It’s going to be unique, so we are trying to prepare the guys as best we can by exposing them to people who have experienced [the pod system].”

That means calling upon some old friends. Paul Stastny, who played for the Pioneers in the early 2000s and spent 55 days in the NHL bubble with the Vegas Golden Nights, spoke with the entire team about the experience. As did Derek Lalonde, an assistant coach at DU for five years who served as an assistant this year for the Stanley Cup champions, the Tampa Bay Lightning. Both talked about what did and didn’t work and explained what Denver can expect as they prepare to start play this week in the pod at Baxter Arena in Omaha, Neb.

“The No. 1 thing that seemed to work was having an attitude of gratefulness that we even have the opportunity to do this,” Carle says. “The second thing that really stood out was maintaining your mental health, because it is an odd environment where you can’t go anywhere, you are constantly under watch and not allowed to leave a certain place.”

DU will open the season on Wednesday night against Minnesota Duluth, and over the next 19 days will play a total of 10 games against five conference rivals. Their first opponent will be No. 4 ranked Minnesota-Duluth. Two nights later they will face top-ranked North Dakota.

“It’s going to be tough and a bit of a grind playing so many games in a short period of time. It’s something we’ve never had to do in a college atmosphere before,” says senior and team captain Kohen Olischefski. “We have never started a season with Duluth and North Dakota back-to-back, so that’s going to be a different challenge for us, but obviously they are in the same boat.”

The student-athletes and coaches are ready for the challenge and grateful for the opportunity to play. However, getting to this point has not been easy. To limit any potential cases of coronavirus, the team has spent the fall primarily in three different cohorts. It was not until recently that they were able to get on the ice together.

Olischefski acknowledges the discipline required by everyone on the team to stay safe. A positive test could easily derail their season, and no one, he says, wants to see things end the way they did last year, with

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This Year’s Emissions Drop Is a ‘Tiny Blip,’ UN Agency Says

(Bloomberg) — Human emissions of the greenhouse gases responsible for climate change will fall between 4.2% and 7.5% this year due to the global industrial slowdown caused by coronavirus lockdowns.

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But carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere will continue to go up, albeit at a slightly reduced pace, according to preliminary data by the World Meteorological Organization released on Monday. The short-term impact of the Covid-19 pandemic can’t be distinguished from natural variability, the United Nations agency said.

“The lockdown-related fall in emissions is just a tiny blip on the long-term graph,” WMO secretary general Petteri Taalas said in a statement. “We need a sustained flattening of the curve.”

Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for centuries, and in the ocean for even longer. That means concentrations of the warming gas will continue to rise for years, even if human emissions fall or are brought to a halt. In 2019, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere breached a new threshold of 410 parts per million, from 400 parts per million in 2015, according to the WMO’s Greenhouse Gas Bulletin released on Monday.

“Such a rate of increase has never been seen in the history of our records,” Taalas said. “The last time the Earth experienced a comparable concentration of CO₂ was 3-5 million years ago, when the temperature was 2-3°C warmer and sea level was 10-20 meters higher than now —but there weren’t 7.7 billion inhabitants.”



chart, pie chart: Heating Power


© Bloomberg
Heating Power

Concentrations of CO₂ in the atmosphere were 48% higher in 2019 than 1750, according to the report. The increase observed from 2018 to 2019 was larger than that observed during the previous one-year period, and larger than the average over the last decade.

Methane presence in the atmosphere were up by 160% from pre-industrial times, while nitrous oxide was up 23%.

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Trinity College to resume in-person classes as COVID cases drop

While COVID-19 cases continue to climb in Connecticut, reaching a 3 percent infection rate Tuesday, Trinity College reported a drop in the number of active cases and a return date for in-person classes.

The Hartford college, which temporarily switched to online instruction last week, said it plans to resume in-person classes on Wednesday as active cases decline.

The college reported its COVID-19 alert status has dropped to yellow after reaching an orange level last week.

At the yellow level, it allows the main body of employees to be present for on-campus tasks, while the orange level only allowed essential employees on campus.

The university’s number of active cases dropped from 32 last week to 18 — 17 students and one employee — on Monday. Of the 18 active cases, Trinity College said nine are students in isolation spaces on campus.

At the University of Connecticut, officials announced eight new cases — three on-campus cases where individuals were already in quarantine and five among employees/affiliates, one of whom had already been working remotely since March.

UConn reported no new off-campus cases. There are 20 students in isolation on campus who have tested positive or are symptomatic, the school said.

Sacred Heart University in Fairfield is reporting at least three additional COVID-19 cases since last week, the school announced Monday. The school has now reached a total of 36 infected students on campus, data shows. Eighty-nine on-campus students have recovered from the virus.

There are 23 off-campus SHU students who have been diagnosed with the coronavirus, with 182 off-campus recoveries, according to the university’s data. One employee has tested positive for the virus.

Yale University reported 23 cases of the virus among students and four among faculty and staff last week. Five of the infected individuals are on-campus students, the data shows.

Fairfield University reported four new cases of the virus on Monday — all among students. Those additional cases put the university’s total number of active positive cases at 80, which includes four faculty and staff members. Eighteen of the student cases are on-campus residents.

The university’s virus alert status remains at orange, or moderate, meaning there are many cases, including community spread with some likely undetected cases, according to the school’s guidelines.

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COVID-19 pushes college students to drop out, which could devastate economy and their lives

Jasmine Justice hit her breaking point during the last week of September.

Trump urges colleges to keep in-person learning

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Overwhelmed at the juggling act of three full-time gigs – as a community college student, an employee and a mom – Justice crumbled. She ignored reminder emails from her instructors to send in her assignments. “I wasn’t comprehending what I was reading. I was looking at diagrams that made no sense.” On Zoom work meetings, she noted her pale complexion and dark under-eye circles. Her appetite disappeared. She snapped at her 17-year-old daughter, Josiah, a high school senior also cooped up inside their small apartment. 

“Being a community college student, it’s a balancing act,” says Justice, 39, a student at Pierce College in Lakewood, Washington, about 50 miles south of Seattle. “And at any moment, the scales could tip.” 

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Across the country, as the coronavirus pandemic continues to upend normalcy and infects Americans, students of every level are trying to adjust to virtual learning and socially distanced schools. But the virus and the ensuing recession have taken a particularly hard toll on community college students like Justice. They’re often older, balancing school and full-time work. Many are single parents. Statistically, they’re often the first in their family to pursue post-secondary education and likely to come from a lower socioeconomic bracket – which impacts access to distance learning necessities like high-speed internet. 



At Southern State Community College in Ohio, enrollment has dropped 16% even as the campus welcomed students back for some in-person learning -- provided they were wearing masks.


© Courtesy Southern State Community College
At Southern State Community College in Ohio, enrollment has dropped 16% even as the campus welcomed students back for some in-person learning — provided they were wearing masks.

And during the pandemic, they’re dropping out or sidelining their education plans. For these students, delaying their education could have devastating consequences.

Rethinking college during coronavirus? You risk not graduating

Race- and class-based gaps already rampant in college achievement could grow to a gaping chasm, experts fear, long after the virus is under control.

“We’ve never experienced anything like (the pandemic) in our lifetime. … The majority of our students are lower-income earners, and if faced with, ‘How am I going to put food on the table?’ versus ‘How am I going to take a class at community college?’ we know what one they’re going to pick,” says Martha Parham at the American Association of Community Colleges. “We already see evidence that the gap is widening – but how do you plan for that when you’re building the plane in flight for the students you have?”

Enrollment is already down 8% nationwide – unusual during a recession – and the economic impact could be significant. Community college programs tend to graduate students who feed directly into the workforce, people like nurses, electricians, mechanics and dental hygienists. In 2012, for example, community college-educated workers added roughly $800 billion to the U.S. economy.

Will students show up for college in fall 2020? Community colleges offer a hint.

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Illinois community colleges see big drop in enrollment amid the coronavirus pandemic, reflecting national declines in higher education

Enrollment at Illinois community colleges plunged nearly 14% this fall, an indication that low-income and older students who typically favor the institutions might be struggling to pursue higher education because of the coronavirus pandemic.



a large brick building with grass in front of a house: Enrollment at Oakton Community College, whose Skokie campus is shown here, dropped this fall by about 12.4% to 7,079 students.


© Erin Hooley / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Enrollment at Oakton Community College, whose Skokie campus is shown here, dropped this fall by about 12.4% to 7,079 students.

All but three of the state’s 48 community colleges saw substantial headcount declines, according to initial data from the Illinois Community College Board. Compared to last year, about 37,200 fewer students enrolled in for-credit classes this fall. Some of the biggest drops were among students over age 30 and in career-track courses such as nursing, construction and welding.

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The preliminary data, collected in an online survey at the end of class registration, mirrors national trends. The latest analysis by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center shows community colleges are suffering the greatest losses, with first-year students down nearly 23%. Countrywide, undergraduate enrollment declined about 4% across all colleges and universities.

In Illinois, community colleges serve a significant population of minority and first-generation students, said Brian Durham, executive director of the ICCB.

Many of these students already face financial or technological hurdles, which have only worsened during the pandemic, Durham said. Enrollment for African American and Latino students were down about 19% compared to a 12% decrease for white students, Durham said.

“Even those that might enroll virtually, they may have a challenge getting access to a computer,” Durham said. “They may have a challenge having enough computers to also allow their children to do virtual instruction. Or of course, it could be that people have lost jobs, or they are having housing challenges.”

In the survey sent to Illinois community colleges, many identified the pandemic as the biggest issue affecting enrollment. Colleges reported large dips in areas such as career technical education and adult education. Those courses typically require in-person instruction, which has been difficult to offer during the pandemic and possibly undesirable to students, Durham said.

Though the state’s community college enrollment has been decreasing in recent years, the drops this fall are steeper. In each year since 2016, enrollment fell between 3% and 4%, according to ICCB. This fall, overall headcount fell by 13.7%.

During economic downturns, community colleges often see demand surge. Instead of entering a shaky job market, recent graduates and adults have enrolled to earn professional certifications and increase their earning potential. This year, community colleges tried to present themselves as affordable options for students who would otherwise be living at home and taking online classes at expensive four-year universities.

Out of the grim data, one bright spot emerged from City Colleges of Chicago. While enrollment at six of the network’s seven schools decreased, the overall headcount at the Malcolm X campus on the Near West Side jumped by 4.7%. Outside of the city, McHenry County College in Crystal Lake and Shawnee Community College in downstate Ullin, near the Missouri border, saw

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COVID-19 is pushing these college students to drop out. That could devastate the economy and their lives.

Jasmine Justice hit her breaking point during the last week of September.

Trump urges colleges to keep in-person learning

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Overwhelmed at the juggling act of three full-time gigs — as a community college student, an employee and a mom — Justice crumbled. She ignored reminder emails from her instructors to send in her assignments. “I wasn’t comprehending what I was reading. I was looking at diagrams that made no sense.” On Zoom work meetings, she noted her pale complexion and dark under-eye circles. Her appetite disappeared. She snapped at her 17-year-old daughter, Josiah, a high school senior also cooped up inside their small apartment. 

“Being a community college student, it’s a balancing act,” says Justice, 39, a student at Pierce College in Lakewood, Washington, about 50 miles south of Seattle. “And at any moment, the scales could tip.” 

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Across the country, as the coronavirus pandemic continues to upend normalcy and infect Americans, students of every level are trying to adjust to virtual learning and socially distanced schools. But the virus and the ensuing recession have taken a particularly hard toll on community college students like Justice. They’re often older, balancing school and full-time work. Many are single parents. Statistically, they’re often the first in their family to pursue post-secondary education and likely to come from a lower socioeconomic bracket — which impacts access to distance learning necessities like high-speed internet. 



At Southern State Community College in Ohio, enrollment has dropped 16% even as the campus welcomed students back for some in-person learning -- provided they were wearing masks.


© Courtesy Southern State Community College
At Southern State Community College in Ohio, enrollment has dropped 16% even as the campus welcomed students back for some in-person learning — provided they were wearing masks.

And during the pandemic, they’re dropping out, or sidelining their education plans. For these students, delaying their education could have devastating consequences.

Rethinking college during coronavirus? You risk not graduating

Race- and class-based gaps already rampant in college achievement could grow to a gaping chasm, experts fear, long after the virus is under control.

“We’ve never experienced anything like (the pandemic) in our lifetime. … The majority of our students are lower-income earners, and if faced with, ‘How am I going to put food on the table?’ versus ‘How am I going to take a class at community college?’ we know what one they’re going to pick,” says Martha Parham at the American Association of Community Colleges. “We already see evidence that the gap is widening — but how do you plan for that when you’re building the plane in flight for the students you have?”

Enrollment is already down 8% nationwide — unusual during a recession — and the economic impact could be significant. Community college programs tend to graduate students who feed directly into the workforce, people like nurses, electricians, mechanics and dental hygienists. In 2012, for example, community college-educated workers added roughly $800 billion to the U.S. economy.

Will students show up for college in fall 2020? Community colleges offer a hint.

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Clemson vs. Georgia Tech score: No. 1 Tigers drop 73 points as Trevor Lawrence posts career passing day

No. 1 Clemson got off to a sluggish start to its early kickoff against Georgia Tech on Saturday. But after a few mental mistakes and the cobwebs were cleared, the Tigers turned took a 7-7 score and turned it into a 52-7 halftime lead and eventually a 73-7 final in one of the most impressive blowouts you’ll see anywhere in college football this week. 

Clemson star quarterback Trevor Lawrence threw for a career-high 404 yards on 24-of-32 passing with five touchdowns and one interception; he was done for the day after the first drive of the second half. Much of that early damage done through the passing game was courtesy of the speedy senior wide receiver Amari Rodgers (six catches, 161 yards, two touchdowns), but the first half included touchdown grabs for Cornell Powell, Frank Ladson and tight end Davis Allen. 

Lawrence gives any group of skill players a high floor, but the ceiling for the pass game was always going to be determined by how the wide receivers stepped up after the departure of Tee Higgins and the loss of Justyn Ross to injury. Early in the season, the answer was leaning on Rodgers and running back Travis Etienne, players who often get mismatches against defenders and excel at making plays after the catch. Even after Lawrence left the game, a big theme of the day was the depth at receiver as players like Ladson, E.J. Williams and Ajou Ajou flashed throughout the day. 

Georgia Tech had some life early thanks to a nice call that had Jalen Camp open down the field for along touchdown, but the Tigers defense buttoned things up after that early scoring drive. Jeff Sims had 59 yards passing on that scoring play to Camp and just 22 yards on the rest of his pass attempts, as the Yellow Jackets offense was limited to just 204 yards at 3.5 yards per play. 

Coaches have bemoaned the absence of nonconference games from the schedule — not expressly because they give the opportunity for extra wins but instead for the extra reps that backups get in games that get lopsided. That playing time on Saturdays is impossible to replicate during the week or in preseason, and it’s huge for solidifying a team’s depth.

Clemson just used Georgia Tech, its annual crossover rival in ACC play, as an opportunity to sort out its depth for the long season ahead and an eventual (likely) postseason run. That says more about Clemson than it does about Georgia Tech, and the fact it got a chance to treat this like a depth-building game against an FCS opponent is going to make it even harder to see them lose later in the year. 

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