Norway Preserves ‘The Scream’ for Future Generations by Burying Digital Copy in Arctic Coal Mine | Smart News

Regardless of what disasters afflict the world over the next 1,000 years, Edvard Munch’s iconic depiction of human suffering, The Scream, should be around to greet whoever’s left. As the Local reports, Norway’s National Museum has placed a digital version of Munch’s masterpiece, along with copies of around 400,000 other objects, in an Arctic coal mine for (very) long-term safekeeping.

Technology company Piql created the Arctic World Archive (AWA) in 2017 as “a safe repository for world memory” designed to last more than a millennium, according to the project’s website. The digital trove features the entirety of the museum’s collections, as well as offerings from other cultural organizations around the world.

“At the National Museum we have works from antiquity until today,” says director Karin Hindsbo in a statement translated by the Local. “We work with the same perspective on the future. The collection is not only ours, but also belongs to the generations after us. By storing a copy of the entire collection in the Arctic World Archive, we are making sure the art will be safe for many centuries.”

Per the Art Newspaper’s Christian House, staff took photographs of the museum’s paintings, works of architecture and other artifacts, then transferred these images to specialized analog film. The medium is designed to keep works readable even as technologies change.

“The only thing you need to read the film is light,” Rolf Yngve Uggen, the museum’s director of collections management, tells the Art Newspaper.

In addition to The Scream, other works preserved in the archive include The Baldishol, a medieval Norwegian tapestry representing part of a calendar, and Harald Sohlberg’s 1914 painting Winter Night in the Mountains. Also featured is a ball dress that belonged to Queen Maud, who ascended to the throne with her husband, Haakon VII, in 1905.

AWA vault
The AWA vault is buried deep in an old mine.

(Arctic World Archive)

The dry, cold and low-oxygen air in the archive helps preserve the plastic film rolls on which the digital images are stored. Storing the images offline, in a remote location, also protects them against cyber attacks.

“It’s like being on another planet,” Uggen tells the Art Newspaper. “It’s like the final frontier.”

Located on the island of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago, east of Greenland, the archive now contains digital replicas of treasures from more than 15 countries. Among the organizations storing copies of artifacts in the AWA are the National Archives of Mexico, the Vatican Library, the European Space Agency and Brazilian multimedia archive the Museum of the Person. A number of corporations have also stored records in the digital repository.

The archive’s designers took into account potential threats from wars and natural disasters, as well as technological and societal changes. According to the AWA’s website, the “futureproof and technology independent” archiving technique is designed to withstand strong electromagnetic energy.

A similar safekeeping venture—the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, which opened in 2008 to store samples of the world’s

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Shanghai Normal University Establishes Digital Humanities Research Center to Promote Chinese DH Research and Education

Press release content from Marketers MEDIA. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

On November 23, 2020, the International Summit Forum on Digital Humanities and the Opening Ceremony of …

On November 23, 2020, the International Summit Forum on Digital Humanities and the Opening Ceremony of Digital Humanities Research Center of Shanghai Normal University (SHNUDH) was held in Xuhui campus of Shanghai Normal University. Dozens of experts and scholars from Harvard, UCL, Academia Sinica, PKU and other well-known universities, research and cultural institutions were invited to attend the meeting.

After a brief and warm opening ceremony, the scholars conducted in-depth exchanges on giving full play to the advantages of Humanities in the digital age, responding to the major concerns of the times and society, and enabling the humanities and social sciences to combine the latest progress in the frontier fields of digital technology, methods and artificial intelligence, and realizing the deep integration and collaborative innovation of science and technology and humanities and social sciences. Scholars also discussed on their research theories and methods, history and current situation, development direction of DH and development mode of DH projects.

Chen Heng, vice president of Shanghai Normal University, pointed out in his speech that the university has a strong accumulation in DH Research. After the establishment of the Digital Humanities Research Center, it will continue to promote the construction of multi-cultural and historical thematic databases, to conduct the “SHNUDH Platform” and DH-Lab, to develop DH research tools, to support publications of relevant research, to advance global academic exchanges and cooperation, and to build a DH teaching system.

Prof. Zha Qinghua, director of SHNUDH, said that DH is a frontier field in the international academia, and is also a burgeoning interdiscipline. It aims to introduce the humanities academic research with digital and technical methods, and to promote its academic innovation. SHNU has always been an important place in the study of humanities in China. The establishment of the center will surely promote the advantages of Chinese Humanities and make it an important and dynamic field at home and abroad.

Author: Zhao Wenwen
Contact: Wang He, vice director of SHNUDH, associate professor of Chinese Literature at SHNU.
Email: [email protected]
Follow SHNUDH Official Accounts: http://ll028.cn/w2aMQU

Contact Info:
Name: Wang He
Email: Send Email
Organization: SHNUDH
Website: https://www.shine.cn/news/metro/2011230416/

Release ID: 88985859

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U.N. Panel: Digital Technology in Policing Can Reinforce Racial Bias

Governments need an abrupt change of direction to avoid “stumbling zombielike into a digital welfare dystopia,” Philip G. Alston, a human rights expert reporting on poverty, told the United Nations General Assembly last year, in a report calling for the regulation of digital technologies, including artificial intelligence, to ensure compliance with human rights. The private companies that play an increasingly dominant role in social welfare delivery, he noted, “operate in a virtually human-rights-free zone.”

Last month, the U.N. expert monitoring contemporary forms of racism flagged concerns that “governments and nonstate actors are developing and deploying emerging digital technologies in ways that are uniquely experimental, dangerous, and discriminatory in the border and immigration enforcement context.”

The European Border and Coast Guard Agency, also called Frontex, has tested unpiloted military-grade drones in the Mediterranean and Aegean for the surveillance and interdiction of vessels of migrants and refugees trying to reach Europe, the expert, E. Tendayi Achiume, reported.

The U.N. antiracism panel, which is charged with monitoring and holding states to account for their compliance with the international convention on eliminating racial discrimination, said states must legislate measures combating racial bias and create independent mechanisms for handling complaints. It emphasized the need for transparency in the design and application of algorithms used in profiling.

“This includes public disclosure of the use of such systems and explanations of how the systems work, what data sets are being used and what measures preventing human rights harms are in place,” the group said.

The panel’s recommendations are aimed at a global audience of 182 states that have signed the convention, but most of the complaints it received over the past two years came from the United States, Ms. Shepherd said, and its findings amplify concerns voiced by American digital rights activists.

American police departments have fiercely resisted sharing details of the number or type of technologies they employ, and there is scarce regulation requiring any accountability for what or how they use them, said Rashida Richardson, a visiting scholar at Rutgers Law School and director of research policy at New York University’s A.I. Now Institute.

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Shanghai Normal University Establishes Digital Humanities Research Center to Promote Chinese DH Research and Education – Press Release

On November 23, 2020, the International Summit Forum on Digital Humanities and the Opening Ceremony of Digital Humanities Research Center of Shanghai Normal University (SHNUDH) was held in Xuhui campus of Shanghai Normal University. Dozens of experts and scholars from Harvard, UCL, Academia Sinica, PKU and other well-known universities, research and cultural institutions were invited to attend the meeting.

 

After a brief and warm opening ceremony, the scholars conducted in-depth exchanges on giving full play to the advantages of Humanities in the digital age, responding to the major concerns of the times and society, and enabling the humanities and social sciences to combine the latest progress in the frontier fields of digital technology, methods and artificial intelligence, and realizing the deep integration and collaborative innovation of science and technology and humanities and social sciences. Scholars also discussed on their research theories and methods, history and current situation, development direction of DH and development mode of DH projects.

Chen Heng, vice president of Shanghai Normal University, pointed out in his speech that the university has a strong accumulation in DH Research. After the establishment of the Digital Humanities Research Center, it will continue to promote the construction of multi-cultural and historical thematic databases, to conduct the “SHNUDH Platform” and DH-Lab, to develop DH research tools, to support publications of relevant research, to advance global academic exchanges and cooperation, and to build a DH teaching system.

Prof. Zha Qinghua, director of SHNUDH, said that DH is a frontier field in the international academia, and is also a burgeoning interdiscipline. It aims to introduce the humanities academic research with digital and technical methods, and to promote its academic innovation. SHNU has always been an important place in the study of humanities in China. The establishment of the center will surely promote the advantages of Chinese Humanities and make it an important and dynamic field at home and abroad.

Author: Zhao Wenwen

Contact: Wang He, vice director of SHNUDH, associate professor of Chinese Literature at SHNU.

Email: [email protected]

Follow SHNUDH Official Accounts: http://ll028.cn/w2aMQU

Media Contact
Company Name: SHNUDH
Contact Person: Wang He
Email: Send Email
Country: China
Website: https://www.shine.cn/news/metro/2011230416/

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Scientists Use DNA To Store Digital Data

In my previous article, I have written about the proliferation and abundance of data in our world, and the need for novel computing mechanisms, as our current computers may not be able to effectively handle such an influx data coming from the increasing use of digital technologies. This being the case, scientists are coming up with creative and cutting edge solutions to harness these large volumes of data in their quest to forge ahead with innovation. However, in order to do so we must either have novel and more efficient computers, or better ways of working and storing the data. One such breakthrough in data storage was recently developed at Harvard University by a team of researchers that used DNA as the storage material for digital data. 

DNA is the building block of life, carrying the genetic material of all life on this planet. Thus, DNA is an exceptionally powerful storage material which has been optimized to store a large volume of information over a span of thousands of years. What if we could leverage it store own digital data in DNA? This is precisely the question researchers lead by a pioneer in the field, George Church, have been gripping with for several years. Using DNA as a storage for digital data may sound like science fiction but with the resent work published in Nature Communications shows that it is not, rather it is reality. In this recently published research scientists have shown that they have figured out a way to encode music from the popular Super Mario Brothers game into 12 synthetics strands of DNA and play it back on the computer. 

In order to do this, the researchers used an ingenious trick of using a well known method from the computer chip manufacturing industry and adapting it to DNA sequencing. The method is known as the photolithographic approach, which uses light to induce a chemical change thereby transferring images onto a substrate, or the surface of a material. It is much akin to the working with film in the dark room, where a photographer uses light to expose image. In this case we can think of an image as information captured on film. The advantage of this method is its high precision as the light can be controlled, thereby allowing information encoding at the level of nucleotide base, or the building blocks of DNA. This process can be repeated many times over, which in turn enables the creation of custom made DNA sequencing with high precision. In other words, if we think about the DNA as composed of legos, we can then imagine the infinite possibility of what can be stored in using this method. 

This research has the potential to revolutionize computing through interweaving nature with computing. It also sheds light to the high complexity and elegance of nature, which

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University of Phoenix Launches a New Digital Platform to Help Working Learners Access Course Materials

PHOENIX, Oct. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — University of Phoenix and BibliU are teaming up to bring students seamless access to course materials in an interactive digital format. The initiative reflects the University of Phoenix’s ongoing commitment to providing students with innovations that help make learning accessible and convenient for working adult learners.

bibliu

“Our students are working adults who lead busy lives; managing time effectively is crucial to them,”  said John Woods, PhD., provost, University of Phoenix. “BibliU’s platform makes it easy to access reading, research and course material they need for their studies. Students can access the digital collection anytime and anywhere just by accessing an app on their computer, tablet, or phone.” 

The BibliU platform provides millions of titles from more than 2,000 publishers. Students can search the entire collection with one click and download unlimited material. BibliU also syncs a student’s highlights and comments across all devices, which helps students find their notes easily.

“We’re delighted to announce that BibliU is working with the University of Phoenix to deliver online digital content to their students,” said Dave Sherwood, CEO and co-founder of BibliU. “The University of Phoenix has always been a pioneer in providing online and digital solutions for their students, and BibliU is excited to help the next generation of the University of Phoenix’s students get the information they need in a rapidly changing world.”

Founded through Oxford University’s startup incubator, BibliU has helped more than 100 institutions across the United States and Europe provide essential course materials from more than 2,000 publishers.

About University of Phoenix
University of Phoenix is continually innovating to help working adults enhance their careers in a rapidly changing world. Flexible schedules, relevant courses and interactive learning help students more effectively pursue career and personal aspirations while balancing their busy lives. We serve a diverse student population, offering degree programs at select locations across the U.S. as well as online. For more information, visit phoenix.edu.

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New Jersey education officials still don’t know the depth of state’s digital divide

More than seven months after schools closed in March, and as coronavirus cases are rising again in New Jersey, the state Department of Education still does not have a solid handle on how many students lack access to the internet or devices on which to learn remotely.



a desk with a laptop computer sitting on top of a table: Chromebooks are seen after being cleaned at an elementary school in August.


© John Moore/Getty Images
Chromebooks are seen after being cleaned at an elementary school in August.

“We are working to collect updated info on the digital divide,” Mike Yaple, a DOE spokesperson, said in an email. Asked for a “ballpark figure” or an estimate on how many students are still struggling to connect, Yaple could not produce one and said the data could take “a few days, a week, or a few weeks,” to compile.

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Tracy Munford, a spokesperson for the department, said in an email Friday that the DOE “has compiled data submitted by school districts and is currently reviewing the data to ensure accuracy.”

The state reported in June that more than 358,000 students needed devices. Since then, some districts have taken it upon themselves and placed massive orders for laptops and Chromebooks, assuming reimbursements will come. Local philanthropists and businesses have also made donations to get students online.

It remains unclear how well this patchwork of solutions has worked.

Now, the New Jersey School Boards Association is calling on the DOE — under the new leadership of acting Commissioner Angelica Allen-McMillan — to produce documentation showing what the state has done to try and close the divide.

In its latest report, the NJSBA surveyed school officials and interviewed local board of education members and superintendents and found that as of July, nearly a quarter of the superintendents who responded said 16 percent or more of their students lacked internet access. Some said they did not have enough time to develop and implement their reopening plans accordingly.

Among other recommendations, the association is urging the DOE to make public a status report detailing how $54 million in “Bridging the Digital Divide” grants and related philanthropic contributions announced in July have been spent and used by schools.

POLITICO has attempted to obtain information on the grants through a public records request but was told the “application and review process is still ongoing.”

The association also recommends the Department of Education develop a statewide report on what students learned during the shutdown, a strategic plan to address learning loss, a report on the experience of New Jersey’s 246,693 special education students during the shutdown and a program to improve online learning.

The school boards association report — and months of conversations with teachers, superintendents and lawmakers — has revealed a foggy picture of what exactly the state has done to help get kids connected.

State Sen. Teresa Ruiz (D-Essex), the most vocal critic of the DOE and the Murphy administration’s approach to handling the digital divide and remote learning, said in an interview last month that “it’s been a complete debacle.”

“I know everybody was hoping for a best-case scenario but

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Higher Digital Launches its Culture Assessment to Measure Higher Education Institutions’ Cultural-Readiness for Digital Transformation

The data-driven assessment allows colleges and universities to obtain actionable data to better align their cultures for successful digital transformation in today’s new age of digital learning

Higher Digital, a leader in helping higher education institutions drive actionable change, launches a data-driven Culture Assessment that can measure an institution’s cultural-readiness for digital transformation. The Culture Assessment is complimentary and available to any employee at any institution.

Recognizing that an institution’s cultural alignment is a critical success factor in digital transformation initiatives, Higher Digital releases the assessment tool to help institutions better understand their culture in the context of a digital world, benchmark themselves against other institutions, and identify priorities for adjusting their culture to embrace strategic change.

“Digital transformation is more than just integrating and upgrading digital technology or moving to the cloud. It requires a cultural alignment that prioritizes and enables such activities to be enacted quickly and successfully,” said Wayne Bovier, CEO of Higher Digital. “Our new Culture Assessment allows institutions to gauge their cultural-readiness and chart a path forward that enables them to keep pace with the new age of digital learning and improve student experiences.”

Higher Digital’s Culture Assessment will help institutions of all sizes, complexity, and stages of digital maturity understand how they score relative to best practices in higher education culture. Features include:

  • Determine the cultural readiness for digital transformation across 3 dimensions (organization, operations, and technology).

  • Quickly prioritize the most important improvement areas to increase chances for digital transformation success.

  • Benchmark results across the industry on cultural aspects of digital transformation.

  • Build awareness of cultural readiness for digital transformation across the institution.

This Culture Assessment is the fourth in a series of assessments that Higher Digital has created for higher education institutions. Earlier this year, Higher Digital collaborated with the Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC) to launch an Accreditation-Readiness Assessment that evaluates distance education capabilities and provides insight to develop an improvement plan. The Culture Assessment is available now, alongside other assessments for digital transformation success, here.

About Higher Digital

Higher Digital is a digital transformation management company that provides consulting, software, and data benchmarking tools to significantly reduce the time and cost for higher education executives to assess, plan, and measure their technology strategies. Higher Digital’s corporate headquarters is located in Tysons Corner, Virginia, and the company’s European office is located in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. For more information, please visit higher.digital.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201027005616/en/

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Emily Brown
REQ
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Education Disruption Brings School Digital Strategies Into Focus

Al Kingsley is MD of NetSupport, Chair of 2 Multi-Academy Trusts in the UK and a regular presenter on all things #EdTech.  @AlKingsley_edu.

With education thrown into disarray by the pandemic, the challenge of providing teaching and learning for K-12 students has been — and continues to be — immense.

Even before the virus made such an impact, many schools had already realized that a growing array of apps and solutions — that they sometimes only used for a short time before abandoning for the next best thing — was not the way to achieve meaningful, technology-enhanced teaching and learning experiences for their students. These were the schools that had defined (or were in the process of defining) a sustainable, pedagogy-driven, whole-school digital strategy for the longer term.

It is, of course, no surprise that they could move more easily to an online learning model than others that had not yet reached this point. But even they were not prepared to review how they could update their strategies to support the new demands of education.

Putting The Pieces Together

High-quality lesson content is paramount, and dedicated teachers across the country have gone all out to plan and shape their lessons for online delivery. But it is not just a matter of switching on the webcam and broadcasting them to students. Online learning is a complex beast that brings with it the need for enhanced communication alongside effective collaboration — not just with students, but with parents, colleagues, school leaders and counselors.

Balancing all these things is crucial if this model of learning is to succeed. So, it is vital that a school has the infrastructure, training and support from the whole school community in place to ensure it has flexible communication and collaboration tools included in its digital strategy, as well as the mechanisms to deliver learning.

The best communication apps will help to increase productivity, visibility and collaboration, rather than create more friction by cluttering inboxes. Cloud solutions can aid collaboration between colleagues, whether by facilitating the shared creating and editing of documents or through the use of comms and collaborative apps such as Slack, Teams or Trello.

Digital strategy practicalities

When creating your digital strategy, my recommendation is to, first, step back, reflect and be totally honest about what your school’s priorities are so you can see which areas need the most attention.

Thanks to Covid-19, there are even more points to add to your checklist now, such as digital equity challenges, blended learning CPD for staff, finding the “right” learning tools that tick the boxes for pedagogy and online safety, and agreeing on effective tools for remote assessment — alongside contingency plans for when staff and students do not have connectivity. Even though the last point is not strictly “digital,” it must factor into your strategy in the interests of students who are disadvantaged by circumstance, not by ability or choice.

Ensuring your school has the infrastructure to support varied learning scenarios is more important than

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Top 10 Mistakes Digital Marketers Make With Salesforce Marketing Cloud

Chitiz Agarwal aka Kumar is a Salesforce.com evangelist with 14 yrs of IT experience. He is the founder and CEO of Techila Global Services

We live in a world of marketing automation and business analytics. Over time, the need for automation in the smallest of businesses and every sector of the industry has skyrocketed.

Salesforce Marketing Cloud is one platform that can help businesses fulfill this need for marketing automation, helping them interact with their clients throughout their buying journey and improve the same by providing personalized services at every stage.

However, many marketers tend to make certain specific mistakes that can lead to their own strategies backfiring. From my experience, here are some of the most common mistakes digital marketers commit while using the marketing cloud and how you can avoid them:

1. Spreading Yourself Thin

Most digital marketers make the mistake of targeting as many customers as they can with the belief that they will get maximum traction.

If you target more audiences than you require, your services can lose their exclusive nature, and you might not be able to attract a particular group of customers. Your marketing messages could eventually fade out in your attempt to make a far-reaching impact.

2. Ignoring Proven Marketing Channels

The marketing cloud can provide you with a channel-specific approach, allowing you to connect with your customers using marketing channels that are most suitable for your business. Never make the mistake of ignoring channels that have been proven to be the most productive for marketing communications, such as email, mobile and social media.

3. Overlooking Your Goals

No matter how flexible you are with it, marketing is a goal-based activity. You need to chart out a detailed marketing plan based on the goals you want to achieve over a specific period of time.

The variety of editions and offerings on the vast platform can make it very easy for digital marketers to overlook their goals and get tempted by specific tools just because they seem enticing. It is always advisable to keep your core marketing goals in mind when you’re performing every activity on the CRM platform.

4. Over-Messaging

Although the Salesforce Marketing Cloud can allow you to create personalized messages and contact your customers through multiple marketing channels, that does not mean it should be used for over-messaging.

No one likes being bombarded with promotional messages from the same company (no matter how loyal a customer they are) when they are busy. The key is to focus on quality instead of quantity. It is advisable to create and deliver fewer messages — provided that these messages have highly engaging, original and creative content.

5. Taking Email Marketing Lightly

Email marketing acts as a strong pillar in any marketing campaign. Never make the mistake of underutilizing the potential of email marketing.

Make sure to draft personalized emails based on the specific needs and preferences of your customers. Email marketing can help you reach out to multiple existing and potential customers

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