Homeless woman found dead on University of Houston campus

Police are investigating the death of a homeless woman found Monday morning on the University of Houston campus, according to police.

A maintenance worker found the woman’s body outside a campus building near Cullen Boulevard and Holman Street, police said. The worker tried to wake her but could not. Her belongings were found in a nearby garage.

Houston police Assistant Chief Sheryl Victorian said an officer recognized the woman as being homeless in the area. She is not a student or affiliated with the school, authorities said.

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University of Houston police spokesman Capt. Bret Collier described the woman as older.

“As always, our priority is the health and well-being of each member of the campus community,” Collier said in a statement. “We do not believe there is any threat to the university community.”

There were no immediate signs of trauma, Victorian said.

“Let’s keep in mind  that last night was a really cold night and tonight is going to be a cold night,” Victorian continued, adding that the woman’s death could have been natural.

Brittany Britto contributed to this report.

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Texas State University football player shot dead in drug deal gone bad

A football player at Texas State University was shot dead in a drug deal gone bad, police said Wednesday.

Khambrail Winters, a 20-year-old defensive back for the Texas State Bobcats, was found with a gunshot wound to the chest at an apartment complex in San Marcos Tuesday at around 9:15 p.m., police said in a statement.

Detectives said that Winters and two others, Enalisa Blackman and Michael Ifeanacho, had gone to The Lodge Apartments that night to buy a couple of ounces of marijuana.

“During the drug deal, Winters was shot and died on scene,” San Marcos police said.

Blackman and Ifeanacho, both 20, were arrested and each charged with capital murder in the student’s death. Both were being held in the Hays County Jail.

Texas State football coach Jake Spavital said he shared news of Winters’ death with his teammates on Wednesday morning and that they were “deeply saddened.”

“We will stand together as a team and support one another during this difficult time,” Spavital said in a statement. “Our thoughts and condolences are with Khambrail’s family and loved ones.”

The team also issued a statement, telling his family that “we cannot possibly know what you’re going through, you are in our thoughts as you go through this incredibly tough time.”

“Remember to tell people you love them every day. Once a Bobcat, always a Bobcat,” the statement said.

Winters, a Houston native, didn’t play in any games in the 2020 season as he was recovering from a torn ACL he suffered in fall camp, according to The Austin American-Statesman.

He was named an honorable mention at the All-Sun Belt conference in 2019, and played in 11 games and started in nine contests, according to the Texas State football website.

Texas Longhorns wide receiver Brennan Eagles, who was a former teammate of Winters at Alief Taylor High School in Houston, also mourned his death.

“God watch over my brothers in this world full of hate that we live in 💔. Love you kham,” Eagles wrote on Twitter.

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IS attack on Afghan university leaves 22 dead

KABUL, Afghanistan — Islamic State militants in Afghanistan stormed Kabul University on Monday as it hosted a book fair attended by the Iranian ambassador, sparking an hours-long gunbattle and leaving at least 22 dead and 22 wounded at the war-torn country’s largest school.

Most of the casualties were students and there were fears the death toll could climb further with some of the wounded said to be in critical condition.

It was the second attack on an educational institution in Kabul in as many weeks.

The Taliban promptly issued a statement denying they took part in the assault, which came as the insurgents continue peace talks with representatives of Kabul’s U.S.-backed government, with the aim to help the United States finally withdraw from Afghanistan. Later in the day, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack.

As the attack unfolded, students and teachers were seen fleeing the part of the campus where law and journalism schools are located, while hand grenades exploded and automatic rifle fire could be heard. Scores of Afghan special forces surrounded the campus, shepherding teachers and students to safety.

The chaos subsided as the sun set over the Afghan capital and the Interior Ministry’s spokesman, Tariq Arian, said all three attackers involved in the assault were killed.

The Islamic State group said it targeted newly graduated “judges and investigators belonging to the apostate Afghan government” gathered at the campus, according to the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors terror online messaging.

The IS statement claimed only two of its fighters were involved, and posted their photographs, which conflicted with the Afghan authorities’ report of three attackers. The claim did not indicate the IS intended to target the Iranian envoy or the book fair.

Last week, IS also claimed a brutal assault on a tutoring center in the Afghan capital’s mostly Shiite neighborhood of Dasht-e-Barchi that killed at least 24 students and wounded more than 100 others on Oct. 24.

The peace negotiations between the Taliban and the Kabul government, known as intra-Afghan talks, were part of a deal Washington signed with the insurgents in February. They are taking place in the Gulf Arab state of Qatar, and are seen as Afghanistan’s best chance at peace – though daily bloodshed has continued.

Five hours into the fighting on Monday, sporadic grenade explosions and automatic weapons fire still echoed down the empty streets surrounding the university’s fenced compound. Afghan troops stood guard.

Ahmad Samim, a university student, told journalists he saw militants armed with pistols and Kalashnikov assault rifles firing at the school, the country’s oldest with some 17,000 students. He said the attack happened at the university’s eastern side, where its law and journalism faculty teach.

Afghan media reported that a book exhibition was being held at the university and attended by a number of dignitaries at the time of the shooting. None of the dignitaries were reported hurt.

While Afghan officials declined to discuss the bookfair, Iran’s semiofficial ISNA news agency reported Sunday that Iranian Ambassador

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At least 22 dead, 22 wounded in ISIS attack on Afghan university

KABUL, Afghanistan — Islamic State militants in Afghanistan stormed Kabul University on Monday as it hosted a book fair attended by the Iranian ambassador, sparking an hours-long gunbattle and leaving at least 22 dead and 22 wounded at the war-torn country’s largest school.

Most of the casualties were students and there were fears the death toll could climb further with some of the wounded said to be in critical condition.

It was the second attack on an educational institution in Kabul in as many weeks.

The Taliban promptly issued a statement denying they took part in the assault, which came as the insurgents continue peace talks with representatives of Kabul’s U.S.-backed government, with the aim to help the United States finally withdraw from Afghanistan. Later in the day, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack.

Gen. Scott Miller, who commands U.S. forces in Afghanistan, told the BBC that Afghan forces must be ready to defend their country. (Operation Resolute Support)

As the attack unfolded, students and teachers were seen fleeing the part of the campus where law and journalism schools are located, while hand grenades exploded and automatic rifle fire could be heard. Scores of Afghan special forces surrounded the campus, shepherding teachers and students to safety.

The chaos subsided as the sun set over the Afghan capital and the Interior Ministry’s spokesman, Tariq Arian, said all three attackers involved in the assault were killed.

The Islamic State group said it targeted newly graduated “judges and investigators belonging to the apostate Afghan government” gathered at the campus, according to the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors terror online messaging.

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ISIS attack on Afghan university leaves 22 dead, 22 wounded

KABUL, Afghanistan — Islamic State militants in Afghanistan stormed Kabul University on Monday as it hosted a book fair attended by the Iranian ambassador, sparking an hours-long gunbattle and leaving at least 22 dead and 22 wounded at the war-torn country’s largest school.

Most of the casualties were students and there were fears the death toll could climb further with some of the wounded said to be in critical condition.

It was the second attack on an educational institution in Kabul in as many weeks.

The Taliban promptly issued a statement denying it took part in the assault, which came as the insurgents continue peace talks with representatives of Kabul’s U.S.-backed government, with the aim to help the United States finally withdraw from Afghanistan. Later in the day, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack.

As the attack unfolded, students and teachers were seen fleeing the part of the campus where law and journalism schools are located, while hand grenades exploded and automatic rifle fire could be heard. Scores of Afghan special forces surrounded the campus, shepherding teachers and students to safety.

The chaos subsided as the sun set over the Afghan capital and the Interior Ministry’s spokesman, Tariq Arian, said all three attackers involved in the assault were killed.

The Islamic State group said it targeted newly graduated “judges and investigators belonging to the apostate Afghan government” gathered at the campus, according to the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors terror online messaging.

The ISIS statement claimed only two of its fighters were involved, and posted their photographs, which conflicted with the Afghan authorities’ report of three attackers. The claim did not indicate the IS intended to target the Iranian envoy or the book fair.

Last week, ISIS also claimed a brutal assault on a tutoring center in the Afghan capital’s mostly Shiite neighborhood of Dasht-e-Barchi that killed at least 24 students and wounded more than 100 others on Oct. 24.

Five hours into the fighting on Monday, sporadic grenade explosions and automatic weapons fire still echoed down the empty streets surrounding the university’s fenced compound. Afghan troops stood guard.

Ahmad Samim, a university student, told journalists he saw militants armed with pistols and Kalashnikov assault rifles firing at the school, the country’s oldest with some 17,000 students. He said the attack happened at the university’s eastern side, where its law and journalism faculty teach.

 

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At least 22 dead after 6-hour siege at Afghanistan university

Nov. 2 (UPI) — A militant attack that lasted for hours at a university in Afghanistan’s capital on Monday has killed nearly two dozen people, authorities said.

The attack at Kabul University killed at least 22 people and injured almost two dozen.

The government has declared Tuesday a national day of mourning.

Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani said authorities would “take revenge for this senseless attack” in a statement issued by the presidential palace.

Witnesses said militants entered classrooms at the school’s law faculty training center and opened fire on students and instructors. They held more than 20 students and professors hostage during the siege.

The school was hosting a book event at the time of the assault, which included senior Afghanistan officials.

Authorities ultimately killed three militants at the university, one of Afghanistan’s largest, to end the standoff.

A regional Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement.

The Islamic State group said on a message on the Telegram app that it had targeted “the graduation of judges and investigators working for the apostate Afghan government.”

COVID-19 restrictions have been eased at the university in recent weeks and students have only recently returned to classes and dormitories.

An affiliate of the Islamic State has fought Afghan and U.S. forces in the country for the past three years. Officials say some fighters have emerged in larger cities like Kabul and have been part of attacks that often resemble those of the Taliban.

The Taliban, which is currently involved in peace talks with the U.S.-backed Afghan government, said it was not involved in Monday’s attack.

Monday’s was the second attack at an educational center in Kabul in the past few weeks. A suicide bomber killed dozens of people at a tutoring center on Oct. 24.

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19 dead, 22 wounded in attack on university in Afghanistan

KABUL, Afghanistan — Gunmen stormed Kabul University on Monday as it hosted a book fair attended by the Iranian ambassador to Afghanistan, sparking an hours-long gun battle and leaving at least 19 dead and 22 wounded at the war-torn country’s largest school.

The ministry’s spokesman, Tariq Arian, also said there were three attackers involved in the assault, all of whom were killed in the ensuing firefight. As the sun slowly set over the Afghan capital, there were few other details though the Taliban issued a statement denying they took part in the assault.

The attack came as the insurgents are continuing peace talks with the U.S.-backed government. Those negotiations, taking place in the Gulf Arab state of Qatar, aim to help the U.S. finally withdraw from America’s longest war, though daily bloodshed continues and an Islamic State affiliate launches its own attacks on Shiites in the country.

Five hours into the fighting, sporadic grenade explosions and automatic weapons fire echoed down the empty streets surrounding the university’s fenced compound. Afghan troops stood guard. Earlier, students were seen fleeing for their lives from the site.

“Unfortunately, there are casualties,” Arian said as the assault unfolded, without elaborating.

Ahmad Samim, a university student, told journalists he saw militants armed with pistols and Kalashnikov assault rifles firing at the school, the country’s oldest with some 17,000 students. He said the attack happened at the university’s eastern side where its law and journalism faculty teach.

Afghan media reported a book exhibition was being held at the university and attended by a number of dignitaries at the time of the shooting.

While Afghan officials declined to discuss the bookfair, Iran’s semiofficial ISNA news agency reported Sunday that Iranian Ambassador Bahador Aminian and cultural attaché Mojtaba Noroozi were scheduled to inaugurate the fair, which would host some 40 Iranian publishers. Iranian state television reported the attack occurred, but did not offer information on its officials.

Iranian diplomats have been targeted previously by attacks in the country and nearly sparked a war between the two countries. In 1998, Iran held the Taliban responsible for the deaths of nine Iranian diplomats who were working in its consulate in northern Afghanistan and sent reinforcements to the 580-mile-long border that Iran and Afghanistan share.

No group immediately took responsibility for the ongoing attack though the Taliban issued a statement saying they were not involved. However, suspicion immediately fell on the Islamic State group.

Last month, the Islamic State group sent a suicide bomber into an education center in the capital’s Shiite dominated neighborhood of Dasht-e-Barchi, killing 24 students and injuring more than 100. The Islamic State affiliate in Afghanistan has declared war on Afghanistan’s minority Shiite Muslims and have staged dozens of attacks since emerging in 2014.

Schools have been targeted for attacks in the past as well. Last year, a bomb outside of the Kabul University campus’ gates killed eight people. In 2016, gunmen attacked the American University in Kabul, killing 13.

Violence has been relentless in Afghanistan even

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The Taliban Denies Involvement After 19 Confirmed Dead

Afghan security forces traded fire with gunmen who stormed the campus of Kabul University on Monday, leaving at least 19 people dead.

“Gunshots still can be heard in the area but security forces have blocked it off,” Tariq Arian, a spokesman for the Afghan Ministry of Interior, told Reuters (via NBC). “We don’t know whether we are dealing with a coordinated attack or something else.”

Accounts of the death toll are fluid, though Arian said at least 19 were killed in the attack.

The latest surge in violence comes as members of the Taliban and Afghan officials work to broker a cease-fire agreement in Qatar to try to bring one of the longest-running conflicts in world history to an end. Neither the Taliban nor any other high-profile groups like al-Qaida said their fighters were involved in the university attack.

Monday’s attack follows the deadliest month in the country in terms of civilian casualties since September 2019. A tally from The New York Times put the October death toll at 212.

During the first nine months of the year, more than 2,000 people died as a result of attacks and another 3,800 were wounded. In August, Saba Sahar, one of the country’s best-known actresses and Afghanistan’s first woman filmmaker, was shot in the stomach as she left for work, but recovered.

Stefano Pontecorvo, NATO’s senior civilian envoy to Afghanistan, said the recent attack was a blow to Afghan reconstruction.

“Afghan children and youth need to feel safe going to school,” he told Reuters.

The university had recently lifted restrictions in place because of the pandemic.

President Donald Trump has campaigned on bringing troops home from the conflict sooner than later.

Negotiators from both sides in Afghanistan's 19-year-old war have been meeting for peace talks in Qatar since September Negotiators from both sides in Afghanistan’s 19-year-old war have been meeting for peace talks in Qatar since September Photo: AFP / WAKIL KOHSAR

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IS attack on Afghan university leaves 22 dead, 22 wounded


KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Islamic State militants in Afghanistan stormed the Kabul University on Monday as it hosted a book fair attended by the Iranian ambassador, sparking an hours-long gun battle and leaving at least 22 dead and 22 wounded at the war-torn country’s largest school.

Most of the casualties were students and there were fears the death toll could climb further with some of the wounded said to be in critical condition.


It was the second attack on an educational institution in Kabul in as many weeks.

The Taliban promptly issued a statement denying they took part in the assault, which came as the insurgents continue peace talks with representatives of Kabul’s U.S.-backed government, with the aim to help the United States finally withdraw from Afghanistan. Later in the day, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack.



As the attack unfolded, students and teachers were seen fleeing the part of the campus where law and journalism schools are located, while hand grenades exploded and automatic rifle fire could be heard. Scores of Afghan special forces surrounded the campus, shepherding teachers and students to safety.


The chaos subsided as the sun set over the Afghan capital and the Interior Ministry’s spokesman, Tariq Arian, said all three attackers involved in the assault were killed.

The Islamic State group said it targeted newly graduated “judges and investigators belonging to the apostate Afghan government” gathered at the campus, according to the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors terror online messaging.


The IS statement claimed only two of its fighters were involved, and posted their photographs, which conflicted with the Afghan authorities’ report of three attackers. The claim did not indicate the IS intended to target the Iranian envoy or the book fair.

Last week, IS also claimed a brutal assault on a tutoring center in the Afghan capital’s mostly Shiite neighborhood of Dasht-e-Barchi that

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At least 19 people dead after gunmen storm Kabul University | Afghanistan

Gunmen have stormed Kabul University as it was hosting a book fair attended by the Iranian ambassador to Afghanistan, leading to a gun battle lasting several hours that left at least 19 people dead and 22 wounded.

The ministry’s spokesman, Tariq Arian, said three attackers participated in the assault on Monday, all of whom were killed in the ensuing firefight.

The Taliban issued a statement denying responsibility for the attack. The insurgents are in peace talks with the Washington-backed government. The negotiations, taking place in Qatar, aim to enable the US to finally withdraw from its longest war, though daily bloodshed continues, while an Islamic State affiliate has launched its own attacks on Shia Muslims in the country.

Five hours into the fighting, sporadic grenade explosions and automatic weapons fire echoed down the empty streets surrounding the fenced university compound as Afghan troops stood guard. Earlier, students were seen fleeing from the site.

“Unfortunately, there are casualties,” Arian said, without elaborating.

Ahmad Samim, a university student, told journalists he saw militants armed with pistols and Kalashnikov assault rifles firing at the school, the country’s oldest, which has about 17,000 students. He said the attack happened at the university’s eastern side, which houses its law and journalism faculty.

Afghan media reported that a book exhibition was being held at the university and attended by a number of dignitaries at the time of the shooting. While Afghan officials declined to discuss the fair, Iran’s semi-official ISNA news agency reported on Sunday that the Iranian ambassador, Bahador Aminian, and the cultural attache Mojtaba Noroozi were scheduled to inaugurate the fair, which was hosting about 40 Iranian publishers. Iranian state television reported on the attack but did not offer information on the officials.

Iranian diplomats have been targeted previously by attacks in the country, nearly provoking a war between the two countries. In 1998, Iran held the Taliban responsible for the deaths of nine Iranian diplomats who were working in its consulate in northern Afghanistan and sent reinforcements to the border the countries share.

No group immediately took responsibility for the attack but suspicion immediately fell on the Isis affiliate.

Last month, the group sent a suicide bomber into an education centre in the capital’s Shia-dominated neighbourhood of Dasht-e-Barchi, killing 24 students and injuring more than 100. It has declared war on Afghanistan’s minority Shia population and staged dozens of attacks since emerging in 2014.

Schools have been targeted for attacks in the past as well. Last year, a bomb outside Kabul University’s gates killed eight people. In 2016, gunmen attacked the American University in Kabul, killing 13.

Violence has been relentless in Afghanistan, even as the Taliban and a government-appointed negotiation team discuss the peace agreement to end more than four decades of war in the country. Progress in the talks in Doha has been painfully slow and despite repeated demands for a reduction in violence, it has continued unabated.

A US deal with the Taliban in February set the stage for the

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