Tapping overlooked marketing data to drive business growth

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Researchers from University of Houston, Columbia University, Emory University, and University of Connecticut published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that reviews factors that contribute to the disconnect between the data companies create and the productive use of that data.


The study, forthcoming in the the Journal of Marketing, is titled “Capturing Marketing Information to Fuel Growth” and is authored by Rex Du, Oded Netzer, David Schweidel, and Debanjan Mitra.

Digital home assistants and wearables have become more popular than ever, collecting detailed information from consumers. In addition to the data explosion, the public offerings of Palantir and Snowflake highlight the rise of companies focused on big data analytics. Yet, despite enterprise leaders’ and researchers’ optimism in the potential that data holds, there is still a disconnect between the volume of data created and the ability of organizations to harness that potential to drive growth. A new article in the Journal of Marketing reviews factors that contribute to this disconnect, drawing attention to organizations’ tendency to focus on data that is easier to access and measure and highlighting overlooked data sources that offer considerable opportunity to support growth.

To examine how marketing data can be leveraged to drive organizational growth, the researchers look at the different ways value can be created for the organization. Drawing on the customer equity framework, they review how marketing data may support growth in customer acquisition, customer relationship development, and customer retention.

With regards to customer acquisition, the study probes the potential for organizations to make use of biometric data to support acquisition efforts, such as identifying the ideal time and means of engaging prospects. It also identifies opportunities to use social network data to make acquisition efforts more efficient and effective by leveraging existing social ties that may facilitate the spread of marketing messages. In developing customer relationships, the researchers discuss what can be gained from identifying and predicting trends so that organizations can stay ahead of the curve. They also highlight how customer-level competitive intelligence can be gathered and used to grow existing customer relationships. To support customer retention, they illustrate the potential to take advantage of unstructured data such as call center logs and videos of service interactions to support firm representatives by providing them with real-time feedback. They also discuss the value that can be derived from data that supports causal inference and how this may be used to support proactive churn mitigation efforts.

Du elaborates that “While we see tremendous potential in tying marketing data to firm growth, we cannot ignore the challenges to implementing a data-driven growth strategy. Specifically, how does an enterprise move from obtaining control over data and deriving relevant insights to implementing a data strategy? For marketing data to drive organizational growth, marketers must consider data as a component of a strategy problem. That is, how can emerging sources of data be brought into alignment with an organization’s growth strategy? To do so, we call for not only quantifying

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A ‘tsunami’ for astrophysics: New Gaia data reveals the best map of our galaxy yet

Astronomers were hit today (Dec. 3) with a huge wave of data from the European Space Agency’s Gaia space observatory.

Those researchers can now explore the best-yet map of the Milky Way, with detailed information on the positions, distances and motion of 1.8 billion cosmic objects, to help us better understand our place in the universe. 

“Gaia data is like a tsunami rolling through astrophysics,” said Martin Barstow, head of the physics and astronomy department at the University of Leicester, who is part of Gaia’s data processing team. He was speaking at a virtual news conference held today, at which another Gaia researcher, Giorgia Busso of the Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands, also told reporters that this data has produced “a revolution” in many fields of astrophysics, from the study of galactic dynamics like stellar evolution to the study of nearby objects like asteroids in the solar system.

Photos: Gaia spacecraft to map Milky Way galaxy

Gaia launched in December 2013 to map the galaxy in unprecedented detail. The $1 billion spacecraft orbits the Lagrange-2, or L2, point, a spot about 1 million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from Earth, where the gravitational forces between our planet and the sun are balanced and the view of the sky is unobstructed. Gaia can measure about 100,000 stars each minute, or 850 million objects each day, and can scan the whole sky about once every two months. 

The latest trove of data improves upon the precision and scope of the two previous Gaia data sets, which were released in 2016 and 2018. For example, compared to the 2018 data, which included measurements for 1.7 billion objects, the 2020 data improves by a factor of two the accuracy of the data points for proper motion, or the apparent change in the position of a star as viewed from our solar system.

“It really gives us an insight into how the Milky Way lives,” Nicholas Walton, an astronomer at the University of Cambridge who is part of Gaia’s science team, said at the same science and news conference. “We’re talking about billions of stars, which really gives us the ability to probe at a meaningful level the whole population of the Milky Way, similar to what you’d want to do with studying people.” 

Walton said the cosmic census would be like having trackers on every person in the U.K. to map their location and monitor their health. “If everyone’s got a tracker, we could tell you if they’re sweating or not. It’s a bit like that with the stars here: We can tell you which ones are sweating, which ones are active, which ones are dormant, which ones are going to die, which ones are going to explode.”

Data from Gaia has already been used across a wide range of applications over the past four years. The mission has helped researchers find the corpse of a galaxy that the Milky Way cannibalized 10 billion years ago, spot 20

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a Learning Management System for Data Integration

SAN MATEO, Calif., Dec. 3, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Celigo, the leading Integration Platform-as-a-Service (iPaaS) provider for both business and technical users, today introduced Celigo University, a learning management system that offers free online tools, resources, training and certification for building integrations across multiple applications.

“In this fast-moving business environment, companies need to efficiently automate and scale while cross-functionally sharing data,” said Jan Arendtsz, Founder and CEO of Celigo. “Regardless of one’s job title or role in the process, integrations should be easy and simple for everyone involved. With the launch of Celigo University, users will become more knowledgeable and empowered to create, customize and deploy the right solutions for their organizations.”

Key features of Celigo University’s on-demand curriculum currently include:

  • Learning paths on the fundamental and advanced features of Celigo’s integrator.io iPaaS platform that enables companies to integrate and manage a wide variety of applications
  • More advanced training on working with NetSuite and Salesforce, EDI integrations and Database, FTP and HTTP connectors
  • Curated courses on Celigo’s Integration Apps, the pre-built, full-featured integrations for popular cloud applications including Amazon, Shopify, Magento, Zendesk, Salesforce and more
  • Developer courses on JavaScript hooks, SuiteScript hooks and integrator.io REST APIs
  • Resource links to relevant webinars, product documentation, demos, ebooks, case studies and whitepapers
  • Incentives for completing training courses and passing quizzes and exams, including points, badges and certification 

For more information, visit Celigo University.

About Celigo

Built for both IT professionals and business users, Celigo is a next-generation integration platform (iPaaS) that easily connects and automates processes across thousands of applications. It allows users to quickly build, manage and handoff complex integrations at scale, requiring fewer IT resources and lowering total cost of ownership.

For more information, visit www.celigo.com, and follow Celigo on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.

For more information, press only:
Rico Andrade
VP of Marketing, Celigo
[email protected]
650-793-3537

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The Milky Way and beyond: Scientists publish new data on nearly 2 billion stars

As of today (Dec. 3), scientists have 1.8 billion local stars at their fingertips.

That bounty is thanks to the European Space Agency’s Gaia mission, which has spent 6.5 years tracking stars in our Milky Way galaxy and beyond. Using the spacecraft’s observations, scientists can create a precise 3D map of stars and find patterns playing out across the galaxy.

“Essentially all of astronomy benefits from this one way or another because it’s very fundamental data,” Anthony Brown, an astronomer at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands and chair of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium Executive team, told Space.com. “It’s a very, very broad survey mission.”

Related: This 3D color map of 1.7 billion stars in the Milky Way is the best ever made

This image shows the paths of 40,000 stars located within 326 light-years of our Milky Way galaxy over the next 400,000 years based on measurements and projections from the European Space Agency’s Gaia spacecraft.. (Image credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC; CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO. Acknowledgement: A. Brown, S. Jordan, T. Roegiers, X. Luri, E. Masana, T. Prusti and A. Moitinho.)

Studying 1.8 billion stars is impressive, of course, but the heart of the mission’s science is the statistical analysis that such large amounts of data facilitate. “I think the precise number doesn’t matter so much,” Brown said. “We’re still only observing probably about 1% of all the stars in the Milky Way, even with this enormous number.”

Although today is scientists’ first chance to access the data publicly, Gaia team members have already dug through it to conduct some initial analyses. One result of that work is that scientists have measured how the solar system is accelerating in its orbit of the Milky Way, a tiny phenomenon.

To do so, Gaia studied more than a million quasars — bright objects at the hearts of galaxies — located so far away that they shouldn’t appear to move. But they do, and in a pattern that points to the center of the center of the Milky Way and reflects all the different tiny tugs that the solar system experiences from neighboring objects.

The result is a value that’s a fraction of a fraction of a meter, measured with a precision still smaller, an eye-wateringly tiny number that couldn’t be calculated meaningfully until the new data release.

“It’s amazing that one can do this,” Brown said of the measurement.

And that’s just the beginning. Today’s data is the Gaia spacecraft’s third trove and includes nearly three years’ worth of observations, less than half of what has been gathered so far. (The disconnect stems from the sheer bulk of data Gaia collects and the processing work that 400 team members spread across Europe must do to turn it into the public results.) And at least two more data releases are planned, potentially more if Gaia’s mission is extended to last a full decade.

Among plenty of other research, the previous data release allowed scientists to track the formation history

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Most accurate data ever for nearly two billion stars

Gaia: astronomers to release most accurate data ever for nearly two billion stars
A diagram of the two most important companion galaxies to the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud or LMC (left) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) made using data from the European Space Agency Gaia satellite. The two galaxies are connected by a 75,000 light-years long bridge of stars, some of which is seen extending from the left of the SMC. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC

Today (3 December), an international team of astronomers announced the most detailed ever catalogue of the stars in a huge swathe of our Milky Way galaxy. The measurements of stellar positions, movement, brightness and colours are in the third early data release from the European Space Agency’s Gaia space observatory, now publicly available. Initial findings include the first optical measurement of the acceleration of the Solar system. The data set, and early scientific discoveries, were presented at a special briefing hosted by the Royal Astronomical Society.


Launched in 2013, Gaia operates in an orbit around the so-called Lagrange 2 (L2) point, located 1.5 million kilometres behind the Earth in the direction away from the Sun. At L2 the gravitational forces between the Earth and Sun are balanced, so the spacecraft stays in a stable position, allowing long-term essentially unobstructed views of the sky.

The primary objective of Gaia is measure stellar distances using the parallax method. In this case astronomers use the observatory to continuously scan the sky, measuring the apparent change in the positions of stars over time, resulting from the Earth’s movement around the Sun.

Knowing that tiny shift in the positions of stars allows their distances to be calculated. On Earth this is made more difficult by the blurring of the Earth’s atmosphere, but in space the measurements are only limited by the optics of the telescope.

Two previous releases included the positions of 1.6 billion stars. This release brings the total to just under 2 billion stars, whose positions are significantly more accurate than in the earlier data. Gaia also tracks the changing brightness and positions of the stars over time across the line of sight (their so-called proper motion), and by splitting their light into spectra, measures how fast they are moving towards or away from the Sun and assesses their chemical composition.

The new data include exceptionally accurate measurements of the 300,000 stars within the closest 326 light years to the Sun. The researchers use these data to predict how the star background will change in the next 1.6 million years. They also confirm that the Solar system is accelerating in its orbit around the Galaxy.

This acceleration is gentle, and is what would be expected from a system in a circular orbit. Over a year the Sun accelerates towards the centre of the Galaxy by 7 mm per second, compared with its speed along its orbit of about 230 kilometres a second.

Gaia data additionally deconstruct the two largest companion galaxies to the Milky Way, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, allowing researchers to see their different stellar populations. A

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Anti-vaxxers exploit confusion over Oxford University data



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Anti-vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety.

Experts fear substantial numbers will refuse the vaccine.

One study predicted only around half of British adults will agree to be vaccinated, severely hitting the ability of the programme to generate herd immunity.

These fears have grown as anti-vaccination campaigners have jumped on criticism of the way the preliminary data from Oxford’s trials has been handled.

The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that protection to 90 per cent.



a group of people standing in front of water: An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London


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An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London

However, officials in the US later claimed the lower dose was given to people only under 55, casting doubts over its ability to protect those who need it most. American analysts have even claimed the vaccine would never be licensed in the US.

British scientists have been less critical, noting that full publication of the data is expected in the Lancet medical journal soon.

The Government has asked the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to assess Oxford’s data, with a view to a rollout early next month.

Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at Oxford and the Government’s life sciences adviser, dismissed the criticism, saying: ‘We weren’t cooking this up as we went along.’ But so-called ‘anti-vaxxers’ have leapt on the confusion to spread fear online.

US campaigner Del Bigtree, producer of the notorious film Vaxxed, described it as a ‘trial disaster’ and sceptics on social media have cast doubts on the vaccine’s safety.

Professor Eleanor Riley, of the University of Edinburgh, said the matter needs to be cleared up rapidly to ensure trust is not lost.

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Anti-vaxxers exploit confusion over Oxford University data to cast doubts on jab’s safety


By Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent For The Daily Mail

02:22 28 Nov 2020, updated 02:22 28 Nov 2020

Anti-vaccine campaigners are exploiting confusion over Oxford researchers’ data to cast doubts on their jab’s safety.

Experts fear substantial numbers will refuse the vaccine.

One study predicted only around half of British adults will agree to be vaccinated, severely hitting the ability of the programme to generate herd immunity.

These fears have grown as anti-vaccination campaigners have jumped on criticism of the way the preliminary data from Oxford’s trials has been handled.

The Oxford team said on Monday that, overall, the trial suggested the vaccine gave 70 per cent protection – but an initial lower dose for the first of the two jabs required would raise that protection to 90 per cent.

An anti-vax demonstrator talks to police while carrying a large syringe near the headquarters of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in London

However, officials in the US later claimed the lower dose was given to people only under 55, casting doubts over its ability to protect those who need it most. American analysts have even claimed the vaccine would never be licensed in the US.

British scientists have been less critical, noting that full publication of the data is expected in the Lancet medical journal soon.

The Government has asked the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) to assess Oxford’s data, with a view to a rollout early next month.

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Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at Oxford and the Government’s life sciences adviser, dismissed the criticism, saying: ‘We weren’t cooking this up as we went along.’ But so-called ‘anti-vaxxers’ have leapt on the confusion to spread fear online.

US campaigner Del Bigtree, producer of the notorious film Vaxxed, described it as a ‘trial disaster’ and sceptics on social media have cast doubts on the vaccine’s safety.

Professor Eleanor Riley, of the University of Edinburgh, said the matter needs to be cleared up rapidly to ensure trust is not lost.

Source Article

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Pitfalls Of Anchoring To Erroneous Pandemic Data

Entrepreneurs’ Organization helps entrepreneurs achieve their full potential by enabling life-enhancing connections, designing shared experiences, and providing collaborative learning. Dr. Gleb Tsipursky, CEO of Disaster Avoidance Experts, author, and EO 360° podcast guest, empowers leaders to avoid business disasters. As a cognitive neuroscientist and expert on how cognitive biases impact human behavior, we asked Dr. Tsipursky what happens to leaders who anchor to the wrong pandemic data. Here’s what he shared:

Have your views stayed the same since the Covid-19 pandemic started in March? Do you know people who continue to view the virus as just a minor inconvenience despite evidence to the contrary?

For instance, many people are still anchored to the erroneous belief spread earlier in the year that Covid-19 isn’t much different from the common flu.

Many top entrepreneurs still express Covid skepticism: For example, Elon Musk said he won’t take a vaccine, casts doubt on Covid tests, and disparages mitigation efforts. That’s despite scientific proof of the benefits of mitigation efforts including masking and new developments, such as recent requests by governors to remain at home and telecommute to slow the third wave of the virus. Similarly, they ignore research showing that crowded indoor spaces such as restaurants, gyms and hotels significantly increase the risk of contracting the virus.

People have a tendency to stick to their beliefs based on the first information they receive. This holds true even with strong new evidence that these beliefs are erroneous. Behavioral economists and cognitive neuroscientists call this mental blind spot anchoring.

Anchoring is one of many dangerous judgment errors, or cognitive biases, that harm the decision-making process in business and every area of life.

Taking steps to address cognitive biases will help us make better decisions to manage risks wisely. Similarly, we can use research-based steps to address anchoring in business decision making.

Anchoring in Fintech: A Case Study 

Let’s look at the case of a fintech startup weighed down by anchoring, which led to a disastrous first few months of remote work and, unfortunately, Covid-19 infections.

When “Lauren,” an EO member and CEO of a130-employee Texas-based startup, first heard of Covid-19, she and her leadership team shrugged it off as a mere nuisance. They didn’t prepare for an extended disruption, opting to follow early CDC guidelines to prepare for a brief interruption caused by a short-term outbreak.

Due to this, the senior management team asked all employees to report to the office as states reopened, totally disregarding news reports of an uptick of cases in Texas.

However, because of the leadership team’s dismissive attitude toward Covid-19, neither executives nor employees took necessary precautions. Many did not follow social distancing guidelines or wear masks in the office environment.

Not surprisingly, problems soon arose, starting with a virus outbreak traced to a company-wide meeting. Almost three dozen staff and three C-suite leaders contracted the virus.

The COO and several employees were hospitalized, and two older employees died. This resulted in a massive decrease in productivity, resignations and low morale.  

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Overseas aid budget for education cut by a quarter this year, data shows | Global development

The overseas aid budget for education was slashed by more than a quarter by the government this year, even before this week’s further axing of a third of aid spending, according to analysis seen by the Guardian.

As anger met the government’s announcement this week, it was revealed that it has already reneged on the Tory manifesto pledge by cutting primary and secondary education funding as part of £2.9bn of cuts made by Dominic Raab in July. On Wednesday in parliament, while announcing he would seek to legally cut the aid budget from 0.7% to 0.5% of gross national income, Raab reiterated a promise to prioritise girls’ education, which was immediately dismissed as “empty rhetoric” by the shadow international secretary.

Labour MP Preet Gill said data analysis showed the government had now broken not one, but two manifesto commitments. Save the Children, whose researchers did the analysis, said the government’s promises on aid and development are “meaningless currency”.

The overseas aid budget from the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) is currently £8.7bn–£2.8bn less than the £11.5bn spent in 2019–20.

There has been a 26% reduction in spend on education, according to analysis of data from the International Aid Transparency Initiative, provided by FCDO. Health has seen a 16% increase, due to a refocus on activities related to Covid-19, such as the global fund, medical research and infectious disease control. However, other areas of health funding that are critical for children – such as basic nutrition, family planning and reproductive healthcare – have been cut, the data shows.

Richard Watts, a senior adviser in development finance at Save the Children, said: “Primary and secondary education were the focus of these education cuts. While they have maintained projects specifically related to girls’ education, the cuts to primary and secondary education will have an important impact on girls’ education.”

Watts said he was also concerned about the reprioritising of the health budget due to Covid, because it has meant a decline in funding to basic nutrition and on family planning and reproductive health.

Gill contrasted the drop in aid funding for primary and secondary schooling with Raab’s comments in the Commons. “The analysis today really calls into question his saying we are going to use the aid budget for girls’ education. That is simply not the case.

“You can’t trust this government, because that’s two commitments. They reneged on the 0.7% manifesto and again on girls’ education. This idea that he’s saying he has prioritised girls’ education at the very same time that there’s been cuts in the money spend by ODA [official development assistance] on education by his department. We’ve seen one programme that they did cut was supporting 200,000 vulnerable young girls completing their schooling, and also cutting teenage pregnancies and sexual violence programmes in Rwanda. These are really important when it comes to addressing inequality.

“So I don’t think we can trust his latest pledge that he is going to prioritise girls going forward … He announced the £2.9bn

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New Hubble data explains missing dark matter

New Hubble data explains missing dark matter
This image shows the sky around the ultra diffuse galaxies NGC 1052-DF4 and NGC 1052-DF2. It was created from images forming part of the Digitized Sky Survey 2. NGC 1052-DF2 is basically invisible in this image.  In 2018 an international team of researchers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and several other observatories uncovered, for the first time, a galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood that is missing most of its dark matter. This discovery of the galaxy NGC 1052-DF2 was a surprise to astronomers, as it was understood that Dark matter (DM) is a key constituent in current models of galaxy formation and evolution. In fact, without the presence of DM, the primordial gas would lack enough gravity pull to start collapsing and forming new galaxies. A year later, another galaxy that misses dark matter was discovered, NGC 1052-DF4, which further triggered intense debates among astronomers about the nature of these objects. Now, new Hubble data have been used to explain the reason behind the missing dark matter in NGC 1052-DF4, which resides 45 million light-years away, providing further evidence for tidal disruption. By studying the galaxy’s light and globular cluster distribution, astronomers have concluded that the gravity forces of the neighbouring galaxy NGC 1035 stripped the dark matter from NGC 1052-DF4 and are now tearing the galaxy apart. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, Digitized Sky Survey 2 Acknowledgement: Davide de Martin

New data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope provides further evidence for tidal disruption in the galaxy NGC 1052-DF4. This result explains a previous finding that this galaxy is missing most of its dark matter. By studying the galaxy’s light and globular cluster distribution, astronomers have concluded that the gravity forces of the neighbouring galaxy NGC 1035 stripped the dark matter from NGC 1052-DF4 and are now tearing the galaxy apart.


In 2018 an international team of researchers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and several other observatories uncovered, for the first time, a galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood that is missing most of its dark matter. This discovery of the galaxy NGC 1052-DF2 was a surprise to astronomers, as it was understood that Dark matter (DM) is a key constituent in current models of galaxy formation and evolution. In fact, without the presence of DM, the primordial gas would lack enough gravity pull to start collapsing and forming new galaxies. A year later, another galaxy that misses dark matter was discovered, NGC 1052-DF4, which further triggered intense debates among astronomers about the nature of these objects.

Now, new Hubble data have been used to explain the reason behind the missing dark matter in NGC 1052-DF4, which resides 45 million light-years away. Mireia Montes of the University of New South Wales in Australia led an international team of astronomers to study the galaxy using deep optical imaging. They discovered that the missing dark matter can be explained by the effects of tidal disruption. The gravity forces of the neighbouring massive galaxy NGC 1035 are tearing NGC 1052-DF4 apart. During this

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