Why Dallas DirecTV and U-Verse customers may miss college football and ‘The Bachelorette,’ and how to watch elsewhere

As channel blackouts for AT&T U-Verse and DirecTV subscribers continue, Dallasites may have to look to alternative sources for their weekly dose of college football and hit shows like The Bachelorette.

That’s because Tegna, owner of Dallas ABC-affiliate station WFAA, has yet to come to an agreement with AT&T-owned TV providers DirecTV and AT&T U-Verse.

It means subscribers could miss out on college football games carried by ABC this weekend, including Ohio State-Michigan State, Indiana-Wisconsin and Clemson-Virginia Tech. The following weekend, ABC will carry the Big 12 Championship game as well as the ACC Championship game.

“We are working on and remain committed to reaching fair deals with DirecTV and AT&T U-verse. Our track record proves it,” Tegna spokeswoman Anne Bentley said in a statement Thursday.

“Over the past few years, we reached hundreds of multiyear deals with cable and satellite companies all across the country,” Bentley said. “The reason we have successfully negotiated so many deals with so many partners is because we seek fair, market-based deals. It has been disappointing that DirecTV and AT&T U-verse, so far, have refused to reach an agreement.”

WFAA's studio in the newly renamed PNC Plaza in Dallas.

Dozens of Texas TV stations owned by media companies Tegna and Irving-based Nexstar could be inaccessible for satellite TV customers for the foreseeable future if the owners can’t agree with TV providers over what the companies are able to charge to carry the broadcast channels.

Nexstar also took its stations dark Wednesday evening after failing to reach a deal with Dish Network. The blackout affected 5.4 million Dish customers.

The longest recent blackout that kept channels dark for Texas TV subscribers was last year when AT&T and CBS failed to reach an agreement for 20 days. The stalemate was resolved just in time for the start of the NFL season.

If companies don’t come to agreement by the time you’re trying to tune into the big game or your favorite show, viewers still have options.

First, stations like WFAA in Dallas are free over the air if you have a working TV antenna that can pick up the station’s signal.

Locast is a not-for-profit live TV broadcast service available in major metro areas like Dallas and carries all the local TV affiliates, including Fox, NBC, ABC and CBS. The service is free to use and requires you to register an account online. It can be downloaded on various platforms, including Roku, Apple’s App Store and Apple TV, Google Play Store, TiVo, Amazon, DirecTV and U-Verse, according to its website.

AT&T was directing WFAA viewers to Locast in light of the channel blackout this week.

ABC offers a dedicated app to stream its shows, but it requires you to log in with your TV provider, meaning it may not be a viable option for DirecTV and AT&T U-Verse subscribers unless you’re willing to switch providers.

ESPN’s app will carry college football games this weekend, including ABC sports programming. Its app also requires logging in to your TV provider.

Hulu and YouTube TV are two other

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University of Phoenix and Dallas College Offer New Credit Transfer Program

PHOENIX–(BUSINESS WIRE)–University of Phoenix and Dallas College announced an agreement today that will allow graduates of Dallas College to easily transfer their credits to University of Phoenix towards earning a bachelor’s degree. Enrolling in the 3+1 transfer program will allow students to save on the cost of their education by spending three years completing general course requirements at Dallas College with a final year at University of Phoenix to earn a Bachelor’s degree in Management, Information Technology, Health Management or Nursing.

“We are excited to align with Dallas College to help address needs in popular industries as IT and healthcare,” said University of Phoenix Provost John Woods. “The ultimate goal is to help prepare students for rewarding careers by getting them started on the right foot. This agreement is a pathway that will help students save money, while still completing their bachelor’s degree in four years. Eligible students need to complete just 11 classes to finish their bachelor’s degree and can graduate in as little as 14 months, when transferring 87 credits to University of Phoenix.”

“Dallas College and University of Phoenix aim to provide students with an opportunity to earn their bachelor’s degree in an affordable manner,” said Dr. Shawnda Floyd, Provost of Dallas College. “Both institutions are committed to offering students an economical path for their educational journey.”

The agreement applies to all seven campuses of Dallas College. Students can transfer up to 87 credits towards a bachelor’s degree. If all 87 credits are transferred, students will only need to complete 33 credits to graduate. University of Phoenix offers undergraduate students one course at a time in five-week increments with new courses starting monthly. Additionally, University of Phoenix will waive all fees and tuition for the first course and provides a special Associate Degree Transfer tuition rate for all remaining courses, which is a savings of $144.00 per course.

For more information visit:

www.phoenix.edu/ccstudent

About University of Phoenix

University of Phoenix is continually innovating to help working adults enhance their careers in a rapidly changing world. Flexible schedules, relevant courses and interactive learning help students more effectively pursue career and personal aspirations while balancing their busy lives. We serve a diverse student population, offering degree programs at select locations across the U.S. as well as online. For more information, visit phoenix.edu

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Here are your candidates for the Dallas College board of trustees election

Dallas College, which has pivoted to nearly all virtual classes during the pandemic, has two board seats up for election on Nov. 3.

The elections come at a time when the system — previously known as Dallas County Community College District — is unifying its seven campuses under Dallas College and as the coronavirus pandemic continues keeping students and faculty largely working and teaching online.

Diana Flores, the board chair and incumbent for district 6, said that the unification process is still in its early stages, meaning that it should be a priority for anyone elected to the board. Other issues of note are making sure that disadvantaged students receive additional financial and academic support, she said.

The system is also still waiting to make use of a $1.1 billion bond, intended to expand facilities, address workforce needs, and build programs. The bond was approved by voters last May, but the use of that money was brought to a halt by a lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed by former GOP Dallas County Sheriff candidate Kirk Launius, alleges that the election was mishandled.

Dallas College cannot use any of the funds until the litigation is concluded, but Flores said that the trustees still have plans for how the funds could eventually be used.

“It’s possible that we will re-look at the projects based on the online environment we’ve moved to, where we would make some changes to make sure we’re the most current in meeting student needs in terms of facilities,” Flores said.

In addition to further adapting the college’s offerings to the circumstances of the pandemic, the board still wants to move forward with the projects they had planned, including building new facilities on multiple campuses, she said.

Flores, 69, is vice president of organizational development for the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. She has been a Dallas College trustee since 1996 and says she wants to continue addressing the challenges students may face, such as poverty. She also wants to improve access to academic advising and strengthen faculty development.

Running against Flores in District 6 — which includes Oak Cliff, West and northwest Dallas — is Angela Enciso, the director of people experience for Teach for America.

Enciso, 30, agreed that the pandemic has changed the needs of students and faculty, which means that trustees must be strategic in how they accommodate them.

Trustees must also address the problems that many students face outside of the classroom — such as homelessness or lack of access to food — and help them through those roadblocks. Those challenges are particularly acute for first-generation students and students of color.

“There are gaps in our education system that are not serving our students of color well,” she said. “That’s where we really have to be strategic in terms of ensuring that we’re bringing community voices to our conversations.”

Enciso said her priorities include increasing workforce opportunities and partnerships for students while keeping tuition affordable. She also expressed support for continuing and expanding the

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Dallas DJ Ursa Minor finds new pandemic career as the Butter Fairy

One of Dallas’ best DJs is now thriving as a baker selling cookies. DJ Ursa Minor is also the Butter Fairy.

Rachel Harvey knows how to pivot. Once a flute player studying music education at the University of Houston, she left school and moved back to North Texas after becoming more interested in being a DJ.

After seven years as DJ Ursa Minor, Harvey quit her day job in 2019 and started mixing full time. She had regular spots at local clubs, private gigs, residencies, and corporate jobs for companies, including Netflix. But then the pandemic shut everything down in March, and her career came to a screeching halt.

“I had to do a bit of digging for myself,” Harvey says. “I’ve always baked, and I found an old Facebook post from 2015 of me bringing chocolate chip cookies to gigs. That’s what I used to do. I had a Super Mario Bros. backpack full of chocolate chips cookies, and I would sell them at gigs.”

Not expecting to have regular work as a DJ until after 2021, Harvey started promoting cookies instead of gigs on social media, and then became the Buttery Fairy in March. She has now sold nearly 5,000 cookies, she says. She even started an online social and support group called the Black Girl Baking Club.

“It ended up working out a lot better than I thought!” Harvey says. “I really wasn’t expecting it to work out or happen so fast. I was just hoping it would help pay the rent. But for months I’ve either been baking cookies or delivering cookies in the craziest PPE that I can muster.”

Her cookies are indeed buttery and soft enough to seem like they just came out of the oven. She has mainly delivered orders up until last week, when she started using a new shop at Oak Cliff’s Tyler Station, Trade, as a pickup spot.

“I’ve known her for years, and this cookie thing just came out of nowhere as COVID started to destroy her success as a DJ,” says Brooke Chaney, an artist and one of the founders of Trade, an artist co-op in Oak Cliff. “She did not let that defeat her and just flipped the script.”

Harvey has also advanced far beyond chocolate chip cookies. She now sells honey lavender and double double, a cookies and cream flavor that includes Oreos. Vegan options include red velvet, confetti, pineapple cherry, a pineapple cookie with dried cherries topped with caramel, and strawberry lemonade.

But her Frosted Flake cookie might be the star of the show, and they are habit forming. Chaney was an early supporter of this particular cookie.

“I used to go to these parties, and she would sell them while she was DJing,” Chaney says. “I bought maybe six or seven the first time and ate all of them. Pillowy, golden discs of Frosted Flake goodness. They’re light, the sugar’s not overwhelming, and they’re soft and cake-like so you can break through to that

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The Dallas Morning News announces staff for its Education Lab

The Dallas Morning News is adding four staffers to its new Education Lab, building a team of journalists to expand the newspaper’s in-depth education coverage.



Gerhard Schröder, Ferdi Sabit Soyer that are sitting on a table: Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and Northern Cyprus Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer during their press conference in Nicosia, Northern Cyprus, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa Sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Sagiroglu Mustafa/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and Northern Cyprus Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer during their press conference in Nicosia, Northern Cyprus, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa Sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM

The Education Lab is The News’ most ambitious move yet into community-funded journalism, where coverage is supported by philanthropic funding.

“The mission of the Education Lab is to report the stories that help kids,” said editor Eva-Marie Ayala. “The stakes are incredibly high because if we don’t get education right, it’s not just one student who is let down but a whole family — a whole city. And we will spend generations trying to overcome those setbacks.”



Gerhard Schröder, Ferdi Sabit Soyer are posing for a picture: Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and Northern Cyprus Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer during their press conference in Nicosia, Northern Cyprus, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Sagiroglu Mustafa/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and Northern Cyprus Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer during their press conference in Nicosia, Northern Cyprus, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM

“I’m excited about the Education Lab team because each journalist has a heart for kids. Their different experiences, perspectives and talents will deepen the reporting and storytelling that serves our communities.”



Gerhard Schröder sitting at a table: Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder talks at the press conference during his visit to Turkish northern Cyprus, for talks with Turkish Cypriot leaders in Nicosia, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa Sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Sagiroglu Mustafa/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder talks at the press conference during his visit to Turkish northern Cyprus, for talks with Turkish Cypriot leaders in Nicosia, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa Sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM

All four reporters — Talia Richman, Emily Donaldson, Valeria Olivares and Nicolette White — have strong ties to Texas.

Richman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist at The Baltimore Sun, will be a reporter with the Ed Lab.



Mehmet Ali Talat, Gerhard Schröder are posing for a picture: Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder shakes hand with Northern Cyprus' President Mehmet Ali Talat during his visit to Turkish northern Cyprus, in Nicosia, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa Sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM


© Sagiroglu Mustafa/ABACA PRESS/Abaca
Former German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder shakes hand with Northern Cyprus’ President Mehmet Ali Talat during his visit to Turkish northern Cyprus, in Nicosia, on February 01, 2008. Gerhard Schroeder called for the economic isolation of northern Cyprus to end and he believed that Greek Cypriot membership of the European Union was the main reason for the failure to lift economic embargoes. Photo by Mustafa Sagiroglu/AA/ABACAPRESS.COM

A Dallas native and Richardson High School graduate, Richman has served as The Sun’s city hall reporter for the past year. She was a part of a team that won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize in Local Reporting, exposing self-dealing from Mayor Cathrerine Pugh through a self-published children’s book and a larger pattern of no-bid contracts among several

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How the coronavirus has changed education for some of Dallas’ most vulnerable students

It’s after midnight when Gabriella Munoz, 18, comes home, legs weary from waiting tables for eight hours. She sits down at her computer and mulls the economics chapters to read and math problems to finish before returning to another day at North Garland High.

This is Munoz’s new routine since the COVID-19 pandemic interrupted her life and left her older sister, who made nearly half of the family’s income, out of a job.

After struggling to keep up with remote learning this spring she was excited to engage with her teachers in a classroom during the first eight weeks of the fall semester. But Munoz, who lives in Rowlett, quickly found her new and unpredictable work hours made it hard to stick to the school schedule.

Based on her experience last year, she’s worried.

“School was very rough for me and I barely passed because I didn’t feel like there was a point,” Munoz said. “The only thing I wanted to do was to go to work and make money because I can look at the money, I can use the money.”

Now, Munoz fears her chances for going to college are in jeopardy as harder courses demand more time and focus that already disadvantaged students like her no longer have.

She is among a more vulnerable group who are considering putting off college because of disruptions caused by COVID, prompting experts to warn that the pandemic may be increasing an achievement gap based on socioeconomic class.

“This whole situation has shed light on the inequity that has existed for a long time,” said Michael Arreola, principal at North Garland High School.

The obstacles for low-income students — no access to tutors, no space to study and new demands to work or take care of siblings — affected many students at the school last year, he said.

In Texas, about 70% public schoolchildren come from families that are struggling financially. Across the Garland Independent School District’s seven high schools, the rate is almost that high — 65%.

District officials noticed last spring that many students didn’t finish their work because of limited access to computers. So Garland ISD handed out more than 10,000 wifi hotspots along with Chromebooks and iPads, which boosted student participation, said Diana Montgomery, Garland ISD’s student success coordinator.

For schools with large numbers of low-income students, that extra technological support could mean the difference between temporary academic losses and those that last long into the future.

“It creates a deeper sense of urgency,” North Garland High School Assistant principal Mark Booker said. “If we are not careful, if we don’t approach our work this fall with fidelity and make sure that we are pushing and fighting for all kids, then we are losing a whole generation of them.”

The problem with online courses

A number of studies show that online courses are less effective than traditional in-person ones.

For instance, researchers at Stanford University found that students who took an in-person class earned roughly a B-,

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COVID-19 outbreak hits University of Dallas campus in Rome as dozens of students test positive

Dozens of students at the University of Dallas campus in Rome, Italy, are in quarantine after an outbreak of COVID-19, according to the university.

Since last week, 61 members of the university’s Rome campus, including at least 52 students, have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a letter to students and parents from Peter Hatlie, dean and director of the Rome programs. There are 78 students in the study abroad program.

So far only a few of the students are experiencing symptoms, which are mild, he said in the letter, dated Monday.

In the letter, Hatlie provided a detailed description of the campus’ actions before and since the outbreak.

Students arrived at the Rome campus Sept. 13, and all tested negative for the virus five days later. By Sept. 27, after completing the 14-day self-isolation required of all new travelers arriving in Italy, students were free to leave campus, shop at local markets and travel. Classes met at St. Peter’s Basilica and the Basilica of St. Mary Major.

The group then traveled to southern Italy and Sicily, where students toured museums and spent time on the beach and in the mountains before returning home on a boat.

On Oct. 10, during the boat ride home, the first student came forward describing a “loss of smell and/or taste” but had no fever, Hatlie wrote. The next day, five more reported symptoms.

Those six students were tested for COVID-19 on Oct. 12, with three testing positive and three negative. The three students who tested positive for the virus “were immediately put into self-isolation from the rest of the community, likewise for their roommates,” according to Hatlie’s letter.

All of the students in the program and 10 campus staff members were subsequently tested on Sunday, Oct. 18, with dozens testing positive for COVID-19.

A lone passenger has a car to himself on the DART Orange Line near the North Lake College station at around 8:00 p.m. on Friday, March 20, 2020, in Irving.

Italian health authorities have required the campus to isolate those who tested positive for COVID-19 from the others and place all students, even those with negative results, under quarantine pending further testing, Hatlie said.

Students will attend online classes for the next 10 days, and the campus has suspended in-person religious services, according to the letter. Meals will be delivered to dormitory rooms, and students will be allowed outdoor recreational time, with alternating access for students who have tested positive and those who have tested negative. Masks are required both indoors and outdoors.

“Rest assured that we will do everything in our power — in cooperation with local health officials — to contain any further spread of COVID-19 on campus, to monitor the health of and find medical support as necessary for infected individuals, and to emerge from this crisis as soon as possible,” Hatlie wrote in the letter.

The city of Irving is expanding a program to help small businesses affected by COVID-19.

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Arizona Cardinals’ Budda Baker gets first career interception as defense steamrolls Dallas

Leading up to Monday’s game, the Cardinals said everyone — offense, defense, special teams, coaches — would have to step up in the absence of linebacker Chandler Jones. 

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Longtime Dallas schools leader receives top honor for being a ‘champion’ for urban education

Dallas ISD superintendent Michael Hinojosa has been named as the 2020 Urban Educator of the Year by the Council of the Great City Schools.

Hinojosa, 64, was presented the award this week in a virtual ceremony during the Council’s 64th annual fall conference. He was the lone finalist for the honor, also known as the Green-Garner Award.

“Michael Hinojosa has been a true champion for urban education and his passion for equity and excellence has had a profound effect on how all of us advocate for our urban students,” said Council Executive Director Michael Casserly in a statement. “Over his 41-year career, his dedication and humility have made a difference in the lives of the students he serves and there could be no one more deserving of this award.”

Hinojosa said the honor was especially meaningful coming from an organization like the Council of the Great City Schools, which focuses its lens on 76 of the nation’s largest urban school districts.

“I believe in the mission of urban public education,” he said. “It’s one of the hardest things to do in this business.”

As part of the award, Hinojosa will receive a $10,000 college scholarship to present to a Dallas ISD student.

Hinojosa, a Sunset High School graduate, started working in education in Dallas in 1979, hired as a teacher at Stockard Middle School. In his second stint as Dallas’ superintendent, Hinojosa has shepherded the district through a stretch of rapid improvement, as DISD cut its number of underperforming campuses from 43 to the single digits. He also helped steer passage of its $1.6 billion bond in 2015, as well as getting approval from voters on a tax-ratification election.

The DMN Education Lab deepens the coverage and conversation about urgent education issues critical to the future of North Texas.

The DMN Education Lab is a community-funded journalism initiative, with support from The Communities Foundation of Texas, The Meadows Foundation, The Dallas Foundation, Southern Methodist University, Todd A. Williams Family Foundation, The Beck Group, Bobby and Lottye Lyle, and the Solutions Journalism Network. The Dallas Morning News retains full editorial control of the Education Lab’s journalism.

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Paul Quinn College in Dallas part of Chipotle’s debt-free degree program for workers

Paul Quinn College in southern Dallas is partnering with Chipotle Mexican Grill in an education initiative that covers 100% of tuition costs up front for eligible employees.

The restaurant chain’s Cultivate Education program can be applied to more than 75 business and technology degrees. The partnership comes as a result of Chipotle’s alliance with Guild Education, a for-profit company that manages tuition reimbursement programs.

After 120 days of employment, Chipotle workers are eligible to pursue debt-free degrees from nonprofit, accredited universities, including Paul Quinn, the nation’s first urban work college and one of its oldest historically Black colleges and universities.

“It expands who we get to define as our students,” Paul Quinn President Michael Sorrell said in an interview with KXAS-TV (NBC 5). “The opportunity to welcome an amazing group of individuals like these to our college, to what we offer, to our culture, is just something we are incredibly thrilled by and frankly quite humbled to have the opportunity to do.”

More than 8,000 Chipotle employees have enrolled in classes since the program launched in 2016, the company said.

“We want to provide employees with the tools to achieve their full potential and recognize that financial barriers can be one of the biggest obstacles for not furthering their education,” Marissa Andrada, chief diversity, inclusion and people officer at Chipotle, said in a written statement. “Ensuring we provide inclusive benefits and a support system for our employees and recognizing the importance of offering an HBCU in our education program will continue to aid in our efforts to cultivate a better world.”

Michael Sorrell, president of Paul Quinn College in Dallas.

Sorrell also spoke about institutions owning their role in making college more affordable, including by changing fee structures.

“Just like Chipotle found a way to do debt-free education, how about we find a way to make sure that students don’t have to ask multiple generations of their families to go into debt for them to graduate?” he said in the NBC 5 interview. “These types of things, we have to have honest conversations about them, in broad daylight, so that then we can address the issues in a way that leaves everyone better off than when the conversation began.”

This story, originally published in Texas Metro News, is reprinted as part of a collaborative partnership between The Dallas Morning News and TMN. The partnership seeks to boost coverage of Dallas’ communities of color, particularly in southern Dallas.

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