Deadline to claim your first stimulus check in 2020 is expired. Here’s your last chance to get it

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Missed the deadline to claim your stimulus money in 2020? You still have an option left.


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The IRS deadline to register a claim for a missing stimulus payment this year has now expired, but you can still file a request to get your missing check — you just have to wait until 2021 to receive up to $1,200 per qualified adult for the first payment the IRS sent in April.

We’ll show you how to figure out if you’re part of a group that could still be eligible for a full or catch-up payment. This is separate from a potential second stimulus check, which Congress is still weighing as part of another economic stimulus package amid increased pressure to ramp up negotiations and pass a new bill. (If a second check is approved, you might get it faster if you do these things now.)

We outline who may qualify for more money in the first round and who might not be eligible for a second payment, if one happens — read on for more information. This story was updated recently.


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How to file for your missing stimulus money in 2021

If you belong to one of the groups below, or tried estimating your total stimulus payment and think the IRS didn’t send your check in full, you have one more chance to claim your stimulus check money, which the IRS is calling the Recovery Rebate Credit. You’ll be able to file in tax season 2021; if the typical schedule holds, your federal tax return will be due April 15, though in 2020, the IRS extended the deadline to July 15 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

While the IRS doesn’t have specific instructions yet for every personal situation (more on these below), the agency does say that people who files taxes can use 2020 Form 1040 or 1040SR to claim a catch-up payment. If you received a partial payment, you’ll need the IRS’ calculated amount from the letter called Notice 1444 Your Economic Impact Payment when you file in 2021.

If you don’t normally file a tax return, do this

In September, the IRS started sending letters to 9 million Americans who may have qualified for a payment but perhaps didn’t know they needed to register to claim it. This group — which the IRS categorizes as “nonfilers” — includes people who didn’t file a tax return in 2018 or 2019, such as older adults, retirees, SSDI recipients and individuals with incomes less than $12,200. Those in this group needed to file a claim using the Non-Filers tool by Nov. 21. The IRS said if you missed the deadline you can claim the payment, which, again, it calls a Recovery Rebate Credit, in 2021 when you file a 2020 federal income tax return:  

When you file a 2020 Form 1040 or 1040SR you may be eligible for the Recovery Rebate

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Deadline to claim your stimulus money this year is passed. What to do now

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We’ll show you how to claim your share of the stimulus check.


Sarah Tew/CNET

The IRS deadline to register a claim this year for a missing stimulus payment was yesterday, Nov. 21. If you missed the Saturday deadline, it doesn’t mean you won’t get a payment, but you won’t get a check this year and will have to wait until 2021 to clam your money. We’ll show you how to do that.

Below, we explain how to see if you’re eligible for more economic impact money and how to estimate your total stimulus payment. This payment is separate from a second stimulus check, which Congress is still considering as part of another economic stimulus package if negotiations can yield a bipartisan agreement on the substance of the legislation.

The federal government still owes money to millions of Americans from the first round of coronavirus relief payments. According to ProPublica, more than 12 million people still hadn’t received all they were due by late October. We outline who may qualify for more money in the first round and who might not be eligible for a second payment, should there be one — read on for more information. This story was updated recently.


Now playing:
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Next stimulus checks: What to expect



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People who don’t normally file a tax return

In September, the IRS started sending letters to 9 million Americans who may qualify for a payment but perhaps didn’t know they needed to register to claim it. This group — which the IRS categorizes as “nonfilers” — includes people who didn’t file a tax return in 2018 or 2019, such as older adults, retirees, SSDI recipients and individuals with incomes less than $12,200. Those in this group needed to file a claim using the Non-Filers tool by Nov. 21. The IRS said if you missed the deadline you can claim the payment — which it calls a “Recovery Rebate Credit” — in 2021 when you file a 2020 federal income tax return:  

When you file a 2020 Form 1040 or 1040SR you may be eligible for the Recovery Rebate Credit. Save your IRS letter – Notice 1444 Your Economic Impact Payment – with your 2020 tax records. You’ll need the amount of the payment in the letter when you file in 2021.

People missing a payment for a dependent child

Under the CARES Act, each qualifying child dependent — those 16 years and younger — was eligible for a $500 check. But some people’s payments were short $500 for each eligible dependent. 

If you claimed it by Nov. 21, you could receive the payment in December. You can use our stimulus check calculator to get an idea of how much you may be owed.

As with the nonfilers, if you missed the deadline, the IRS said you can claim the payment on your 2020 federal tax return in 2021, by filing a 2020 Form 1040 or 1040SR.

Note that in a few cases, where

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Manchester University chief apologises for false claim over ‘racial profiling’ incident

The University of Manchester’s vice-chancellor has apologised for falsely claiming to have contacted the alleged victim of a racial profiling incident on campus.

Nancy Rothwell told BBC Newsnight on Thursday she had written to first-year student Zac Adan, 19, to apologise after he was pinned to a wall by security guards who demanded to see his student ID.

During the interview, she said she had been “very, very concerned” by the incident and had “apologised to the student for the distress that he felt”.

However, she has since written to Adan to “sincerely apologise” over the claim. In a YouTube video posted by the university’s media team, Rothwell said the last few weeks had been “extremely difficult” for the university.

Last night, I appeared on BBC Newsnight. It was a difficult interview. This morning, I realised that one of the things I said in that interview, with good intent, was, in fact, incorrect,” she said.

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“I said that I had written to the student that was involved in a serious incident on 13 November. I found out today that, in fact, that was not included in correspondence to him. I am devastated that I made the wrong remark on national television.”

She added: “I can’t tell you how sorry I am about it. I can only commit to the fact that I am passionate about this university, about our staff, our students, and our values, which, of course, include zero tolerance of any discrimination, and support for everybody within it, and I will do the very best I can to uphold those values, and to support our university.”

Adan, a student of French and linguistics, said he was accused of “looking like a drug dealer” by the security officers after returning to the university’s Fallowfield campus from a visit to a local shop on 13 November. He told the BBC he had been left “traumatised” by the events.

The University of Manchester (UoM), which is part of the prestigious Russell group of universities, has since suspended the officers involved and launched an investigation into the incident.

Rothwell’s renewed apology over the handling of the incident comes after anti-racism campaigners called for her to resign last week. On Monday night, dozens of students took part in a protest on campus amid growing anger at the university’s handling of the coronavirus lockdown.

The university has been at the centre of a series of controversies this term, including the installation of temporary fencing around the Fallowfield campus without prior warning, prompting demonstrations from students. The fencing, which was erected on the first day of the lockdown, cost £11,000 and was torn down by students.

A small group of students have also occupied a university building to demand a 40% cut in rent at residential halls following most tuition moving online. A counter-offer of a 20% reduction from the university was this week described as “a slap

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New Documents Back Claim That Education Department Killed Website Meant to Help Defrauded Students

House Democrats released new documents Tuesday detailing how high-ranking Education Department officials froze the development of a website that its Federal Student Aid office designed to help students who have been defrauded by their colleges apply for loan forgiveness, arguing the tool made the process too easy.



a sign on the side of a building: The US Department of Education building building is seen in Washington, DC, on July 22, 2019. (Photo by Alastair Pike / AFP) (Photo credit should read ALASTAIR PIKE/AFP via Getty Images)


© (ALASTAIR PIKE/AFP/Getty Images)
The US Department of Education building building is seen in Washington, DC, on July 22, 2019. (Photo by Alastair Pike / AFP) (Photo credit should read ALASTAIR PIKE/AFP via Getty Images)

“We are deeply troubled that the Department of Education halted a web tool to help simplify and streamline the process for defrauded students applying for relief,” Rep. Carolyn Maloney of New York, the chairwoman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, and Rep. Bobby Scott of Virginia, the chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor, said in a joint statement they released alongside 12 pages of new documents they say prove department officials attempted to block the website.

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“Today, we are releasing further evidence that the Department of Education continues to undermine and harm these defrauded students at every turn,” the Democratic members said.

The documents made public by Maloney and Scott include change orders to the federal contract between the Education Department and Accenture, the contractor hired to produce the new website, as well as emails between Federal Students Aid employees dated May 21, 2020, that include repeated directives to halt work on the website, including “a request to stop work,” “delay the implementation,” “deferred to a later release” and “all work on borrower defense … should stop for now.”

“I know this is disappointing, as many of us have done a lot of work to get to this point,” Jessica Barrett Simpson, a career staffer at the Education Department who is a program manager of digital customer care at the Federal Student Aid office, wrote in one email to her team.

Together the documents and emails show high-ranking Education Department officials did, in fact, halt the development of the new tool, despite claims that it was never blocked.

In June, U.S. News first reported whistleblower complaints to the Department of Education’s inspector general that high-ranking Education Department officials effectively killed the new online tool. According to the whistleblower, Principal Deputy Undersecretary Diane Auer Jones halted the development of it, claiming it was too user-friendly and would have helped too many borrowers complete the application correctly, without any disqualifying mistakes.

“Anyone who says that there has been any effort by anyone at the Department to delay or obstruct the development of a new borrower defense form or website is lying,” a spokeswoman for the department said at the time.

The development of the website was part of a $90 million federal contract to build one main hub for all federal student aid needs that modernized existing loan servicing portals and made them more user-friendly – in the same way that the application for federal student aid was recently redesigned and streamlined to make it

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New Documents Back Claim That Education Department Killed Website Meant to Help Defrauded Students | Education News

House Democrats released new documents Tuesday detailing how high-ranking Education Department officials froze the development of a website that its Federal Student Aid office designed to help students who have been defrauded by their colleges apply for loan forgiveness, arguing the tool made the process too easy.

“We are deeply troubled that the Department of Education halted a web tool to help simplify and streamline the process for defrauded students applying for relief,” Rep. Carolyn Maloney of New York, the chairwoman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, and Rep. Bobby Scott of Virginia, the chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor, said in a joint statement they released alongside 12 pages of new documents they say prove department officials attempted to block the website.

“Today, we are releasing further evidence that the Department of Education continues to undermine and harm these defrauded students at every turn,” the Democratic members said.

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The documents made public by Maloney and Scott include change orders to the federal contract between the Education Department and Accenture, the contractor hired to produce the new website, as well as emails between Federal Students Aid employees dated May 21, 2020, that include repeated directives to halt work on the website, including “a request to stop work,” “delay the implementation,” “deferred to a later release” and “all work on borrower defense … should stop for now.”

“I know this is disappointing, as many of us have done a lot of work to get to this point,” Jessica Barrett Simpson, a career staffer at the Education Department who is a program manager of digital customer care at the Federal Student Aid office, wrote in one email to her team.

Together the documents and emails show high-ranking Education Department officials did, in fact, halt the development of the new tool, despite claims that it was never blocked.

In June, U.S. News first reported whistleblower complaints to the Department of Education’s inspector general that high-ranking Education Department officials effectively killed the new online tool. According to the whistleblower, Principal Deputy Undersecretary Diane Auer Jones halted the development of it, claiming it was too user-friendly and would have helped too many borrowers complete the application correctly, without any disqualifying mistakes.

“Anyone who says that there has been any effort by anyone at the Department to delay or obstruct the development of a new borrower defense form or website is lying,” a spokeswoman for the department said at the time.

The development of the website was part of a $90 million federal contract to build one main hub for all federal student aid needs that modernized existing loan servicing portals and made them more user-friendly – in the same way that the application for federal student aid was recently redesigned and streamlined to make it easier for students to apply.

As part of the larger redesign, staff at the Federal Student Aid office, all of whom are career officers and not political appointees, were tasked with developing a

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Black former University of Iowa football players seek $20M in racial discrimination claim

The University of Iowa has rejected a request from several of its Black former football players demanding $20 million in damages over the racial discrimination they faced while playing for the Hawkeyes.

In a letter dated Oct. 5, civil rights attorney Demario Solomon-Simmons — who is representing the players — wrote the university saying that during their college football career the eight players “were subjected to intentional race discrimination by coaching staff and administration.”

“Through the Program’s pervasive harassment, bullying, policies causing disparate impact, and race-based threats and retaliation, our clients were deprived of a meaningful opportunity to pursue a high-quality education while competing at the highest level of collegiate athletics,” Solomon-Simmons continued.

Specifically, the letter was addressed to Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz, assistant coach Brian Ferentz and athletic director Gary Berta, calling for all three to be fired.

In addition to the firings and the multimillion-dollar payout, the letter had other demands, including compulsory anti-racist training for all athletics staff, the creation of a permanent Black male senior administrator position in the department and tuition waivers for all Black players who didn’t graduate under Kirk Ferentz’s 22-year tenure as head coach.  

The letter also stated that if the university failed to agree to the terms listed by Monday, Oct. 19, then a lawsuit against the coaches and the university would “promptly” be filed.

On Sunday, Carroll Reasoner — the university’s general counsel — replied, “We respectfully decline your monetary and personnel demands,” noting that the university and team had already “publicly addressed some of the concerns.”

Widespread allegations of racial discrimination and mistreatment at the university surfaced in June when 60 former players publicly shared their experiences. This led to Iowa firing its longtime strength and conditioning coach Chris Boyle and having law firm Husch Blackwell conduct an independent review of the football program.

The review, released at the end of July, stated that the program’s structure “perpetuated racial or cultural biases and diminished the value of cultural diversity,” but that “immediate and positive changes” had been implemented since the review started.

The potentially looming lawsuit comes as the Hawkeyes are set to start their coronavirus-shortened season at Purdue on Saturday.

Ferentz briefly addressed the letter Sunday night.

“I am disappointed to receive this type of demand letter. Due to the threat of litigation, I am not able to address the specific comments made by our former players,” Ferentz said, per the Des Moines Register. “As you may know, this past summer we made adjustments to create a more inclusive and welcoming environment for all of our student-athletes. These changes include both policies and rules, as well as an expanded leadership council of current players and a new advisory committee comprised of former players.”

The existence of Solomon-Simmons’s letter was first reported by the Register. 

Solomon-Simmons’s office told The Hill that he’s expected to formally respond to Iowa’s rejection of his sometime Monday afternoon.

The university’s general counsel’s office didn’t immediately respond to The Hill’s request for comment.

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No. 2 Alabama overpowers No. 3 Georgia late, lays early claim to College Football Playoff slot

It was a matchup of elite college football programs that lived up to the hype for most of the game. No. 2 Alabama and No. 3 Georgia were tight for three quarters before the Crimson Tide took charge and walked away with a 41-24 victory. 

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Who will teach the teachers? Budget cuts claim a major university education program.

How many times have we heard that perhaps the single most important factor in a student’s classroom success is the quality of the teacher? What does it mean, then, when one of the most prolific providers of teachers in the Tampa area — one that once was among the nation’s largest programs — decided to shut its doors? A shock to the state budget might be the most immediate impetus for the move, but some observers have suggested that the University of South Florida might want to rethink its approach rather than just closing shop on its College of Education undergraduate program. Read on for that and more Florida education news.



a statue in front of a brick building: The University of South Florida College of Education. [OCTAVIO JONES  |  Times]


© OCTAVIO JONES | Times]/Tampa Bay Times/TNS
The University of South Florida College of Education. [OCTAVIO JONES | Times]

Yes, you read that right. The University of South Florida announced the end of its undergraduate program in the College of Education. Officials said it’s a money thing.

Speaking of universities … Did you know Florida’s public university system is the only one in the nation to require applicants to submit an SAT or ACT score this year? Some seniors are struggling to find a place to take the test.

Are Florida teens ready for higher education? A recent study suggested teachers are too lenient with their course grades. Some district educators said the report offered nothing new.

Teach U.S. history objectively. The Citrus County School Board says it doesn’t want curriculum brought forth by “radical groups,” the Citrus County Chronicle reports.

Mask mandates are dividing school districts. The Indian River County School Board decided not to act on a recommendation to end its rule, instead asking for clarifications, TC Palm reports.

Where are campus coronavirus outbreaks coming from? At one Duval County high school, an off-campus homecoming week party is the likely culprit, the Florida Times-Union reports.Pace High in Santa Rosa County has the state’s highest positivity rate among schools, the Pensacola News Journal reports. Officials don’t plan to change anything at the school.

Students are showing up. After a spotty spring, Palm Beach County children are attending class in better numbers — both online and in person — at the schools serving the district’s poorest communities, the Palm Beach Post reports.

From the campaign trail … Questions are arising about the financial support between a Broward County School Board member and the county sheriff, Florida Bulldog reports.An activist group has launched a campaign opposing Okaloosa County’s school sales tax referendum, questioning the district’s use of tax dollars, the Northwest Florida Daily News reports.

Race remarks get a teacher in hot water. Thousands of people have signed an online petition calling for disciplinary action against an Osceola County high school teacher who told her class she had a right to “dislike Black people,” WFTV reports.

Need a school bus? The Alachua County school district has plenty extra, having just bought a new fleet, and it’s donating some to civic groups, the Gainesville Sun reports.

Stay safe. Two Bay

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