So long, jazzoids. After nearly 30 years, KNKX’s Dick Stein calls it a career

Dick Stein finally felt comfortable telling the story — the real story.

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At long last, he was ready to come clean.

“Maybe since we’re doing, ‘now it can be told,’ I can tell you the truth,” Stein said by phone, on the first day of what would be his last week as a jazz DJ and host on KNKX.

“I never knew anyone named Jeannine. I never dated anybody named Jeannine,” Stein went on to admit.

“I just like the song.”

It was one of several revelations divulged Monday, during a wide-ranging conversation that clearly made Stein more uncomfortable than listeners are accustomed to.

After spending the better part of three decades on the air at KPLU and later KNKX, including weaving numerous colorful tales to explain his well-known affinity for the jazz standard “Jeannine,” it turns out that the 75-year-old local radio personality had no idea that his imminent retirement would strike such a chord.

Stein said the reaction to the news — which was announced in a short personal note he penned for KNKX last week — left him “overwhelmed,” and, for once, searching for the right words.

“To be honest, I really didn’t expect all of this. I didn’t think it would be that big of a deal,” Stein told The News Tribune, downplaying the situation with self-effacement and humility.

“I was really just moved by it,” Stein said.

While the prospect of a career twilight tribute might make Stein squirm, it should come as no surprise that news of his retirement has reverberated across the South Sound

Having begun his career as a jazz DJ at KPLU in the early 1990s, Stein’s unique voice and offbeat sense of humor — which seem specifically designed for dry one-liners — have become staples for public radio listeners in the area.

Whether you’re a fan of his favored music or not, Stein’s familiar “Hi ho, Jazzoids!” sign on and his descriptions of the “Big Red Switch” in the studio — which back in the original KPLU days was essentially a reset button that would erase the station’s software — were long ago woven into the local cultural fabric.

So, too, was Stein’s predictable playing of a rendition of “Jeannine” every Friday.

By speakerphone from his Tacoma home on Monday, Stein said it was simply time to hang it up.

If that meant dispelling the mystery of Jeannine after all these years — and putting an end to the playful speculation and innuendo he cultivated behind the microphone, which typically revolved around fabricated romantic encounters from his younger days — so be it.

“I’m no spring chicken. I’ve been doing this for a long time,” Stein said of his decision to call it a career.

“I don’t know what I’m going to do,” he added with a chuckle. “It just seemed like it was time to retire. I’m pretty old.”

Stein’s career playing jazz for local listeners actually marked his second foray into radio.

Originally from New York,

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Eagles’ Darius Slay calls performance against DK Metcalf the worst game of his career

The Philadelphia Eagles gave Darius Slay $50 million over three years to contain elite wide receivers like DK Metcalf. To say Slay fell flat on his face in the Eagles’ loss to the Seattle Seahawks would be an understatement. 

Metcalf finished with 10 catches for a career-high 177 yards in Seattle’s 23-17 win over Philadelphia, with seven catches for 141 yards were when Slay was covering him. The Eagles decided to leave their high-priced cornerback in man coverage against Metcalf, who dominated the matchup against Slay throughout the night.

“It was tough. I feel like the plays weren’t going my way,” Slay admitted after the game. “Like I said, he did a great job of catching the ball. He did everything good as a receiver. I would say this is by far the worst game I have ever played in the league. I truly lost every 50/50 ball. I was probably 0-for. I have never been that, but I say props to him, he played his ass off today, and I have to get better.

“I let the team down. I told the defense, that game was on me.”

Slay took full accountability for his performance, which is uncommon with the recent history of Eagles’ high-priced cornerbacks. The Eagles haven’t received the bang for their buck regarding Slay’s contract, as the former All-Pro cornerback has allowed 71.4% of the passes targeted his way to be caught heading into Monday’s loss against the Seahawks. Slay has allowed 8.0 yards per target as opposing quarterbacks have a 100.8 passer rating when targeting him, even though he’s only allowed one touchdown on the year. 

The Eagles guaranteed Slay $12 million this year to be an elite cornerback. While Slay has played the part at times, the lack of interceptions (zero) and passes defensed (four) are concerning — despite Slay being targeted just 5.1 times a game (not counting his numbers against the Seahawks). 

“I am a man about what I do. I am always feeling great. I am not always in a bad mood or bad spirit, but I understand and I have great ownership,” Slay said. “I know that I can change the game and I could have helped. I put that game on me because I was supposed to do my job and shut him down. 

“Like I said, he was making every catch possible, every 50/50 one. That is why he had no yards after catch because I am right there. He just made more plays than I did and I take real big ownership because I feel like I am one of the best in the game and I will continue to take my ownership. He got the best of me today, but I am looking forward to going to work next week, this week, and getting better for the team. They deserve it, I deserve it, and this organization does.”

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Lindsey Graham Calls Biden, Pelosi and Schumer ‘Trifecta from Hell,’ Says They’ll End Electoral College

On Monday night, Republican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham called President-elect Joe Biden, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York a “trifecta from hell” and said that all three would help end the Electoral College.



Lindsey Graham wearing a suit and tie: In a Monday night Fox News interview, Republican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham called President-elect Joe Biden, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer a "trifecta from Hell" and said that all three would help end the electoral college. In this September 27, 2018 photo, Graham speaks at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.


© Michael Reynolds – Pool/Getty
In a Monday night Fox News interview, Republican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham called President-elect Joe Biden, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer a “trifecta from Hell” and said that all three would help end the electoral college. In this September 27, 2018 photo, Graham speaks at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.

Graham made his comments while appearing as a guest on the Fox News program Hannity, which was guest hosted Monday night by former Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.). He appeared on the show to predict the political ramifications if Democrats win the January special runoff election in Georgia. The election will determine the state’s two Senate seats and, thus, party control of the national Senate.

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“If we lose these two Senate seats in Georgia, Pelosi will run the house, Schumer will run the Senate and, if the president falls short and Biden gets to be president, you’re gonna have Pelosi, Schumer and Biden,” Graham said. “That’s the trifecta from hell for big government, it’s a nightmare for conservatism, it’s the end of checks and balances.”

Graham then claimed the trifecta would change the number of justices on the U.S. Supreme Court from nine to 13 and then eventually abolish the Electoral College.

“The winner of the presidency would go to the popular vote,” Graham said. “That means that South Carolina, Georgia and other states would be basically dealt out, and California and New York would pick the president in perpetuity. It would fundamentally change the country as we know it.”

Graham also voiced worries that mail-in voting in the state of Georgia could swing the runoff election’s outcome to favor Democrats.

“If you expand mail-in voting in Georgia and you allow a single person to validate the signature at an election office, and you don’t have bipartisan signature validation, that’s a formula for disaster for our two candidates in Georgia,” he said.

The Georgia runoff election is scheduled for January 5, with early voting beginning on December 14. Democratic candidates Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff are facing off against Republican opponents Senators Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, respectively.

On Monday, Georgia’s State Election Board extended two emergency rules for absentee voting ahead of the January runoff. The rules will continue the use of secure absentee ballot drop boxes and require counties to process absentee ballots a week before January 5.

The rules will not require bipartisan signature validation like Graham voiced support for on Hannity.

If Warnock and Ossoff beat Loeffler and Perdue, the Senate will be tied with each major political party holding 50 seats each.

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China calls launch a success as robotic spacecraft heads to moon

WENCHANG, China (Reuters) – China hailed as a success its pre-dawn launch on Tuesday of a robotic spacecraft to bring back rocks from the moon in the first bid by any country to retrieve lunar surface samples since the 1970s, a mission underscoring Chinese ambitions in space.

The Long March-5 Y5 rocket, carrying the Chang’e-5 lunar probe, takes off from Wenchang Space Launch Center, in Wenchang, Hainan province, China November 24, 2020. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang

The Long March-5, China’s largest carrier rocket, blasted off at 4:30 a.m. Beijing time (2030 GMT on Monday) in a launch from Wenchang Space Launch Center on the southern Chinese island of Hainan carrying the Chang’e-5 spacecraft.

The China National Space Administration (CNSA) called the launch a success and said in a statement that the rocket flew for nearly 37 minutes before sending the spacecraft on its intended trajectory.

The Chang’e-5 mission, named after the ancient Chinese goddess of the moon, will seek to collect lunar material to help scientists understand more about the moon’s origins and formation. The mission will test China’s ability to remotely acquire samples from space, ahead of more complex missions.

State broadcaster CCTV, which ran live coverage of the launch, showed images of CNSA staff in blue uniforms applauding and cheering as they watched the spacecraft climbing through the atmosphere, lighting up the night sky.

If the mission is completed as planned, it would make China only the third country to have retrieved lunar samples, joining the United States and the Soviet Union.

Upon entering the moon’s orbit, the spacecraft is intended to deploy a pair of vehicles to the lunar surface: a lander and an ascender. The landing is due to take place in about eight days, according to Pei Zhaoyu, a spokesman for the mission. The probe is due to be on the lunar surface for about two days, while the entire mission is scheduled to take around 23 days.

The plan is for the lander to drill into the lunar surface, with a robotic arm scooping out soil and rocks. This material would be transferred to the ascender vehicle, which is due to carry it from the surface and then dock with an orbiting module.

The samples then would be transferred to a return capsule for the return trip to Earth, with a landing in China’s Inner Mongolia region.

“The biggest challenges … are the sampling work on the lunar surface, take-off from the lunar surface, rendezvous and docking in the lunar orbit, as well as high-speed re-entry to Earth,” said Pei, also director of the space administration’s Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center.

“We can conduct sampling through circumlunar and moon- landing exploration, but it is more intuitive to obtain samples to conduct scientific research – the method is more direct,” Pei added. “Plus, there will be more instruments and more methods to study them on Earth.”

SPACE STATION PLANS

China, which last year carried out the first landing on the far side of the moon and

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China Calls Launch a Success as Robotic Spacecraft Heads to Moon | World News

WENCHANG, China (Reuters) – China hailed as a success its pre-dawn launch on Tuesday of a robotic spacecraft to bring back rocks from the moon in the first bid by any country to retrieve lunar surface samples since the 1970s, a mission underscoring Chinese ambitions in space.

The Long March-5, China’s largest carrier rocket, blasted off at 4:30 a.m. Beijing time (2030 GMT on Monday) in a launch from Wenchang Space Launch Center on the southern Chinese island of Hainan carrying the Chang’e-5 spacecraft.

The China National Space Administration (CNSA) called the launch a success and said in a statement that the rocket flew for nearly 37 minutes before sending the spacecraft on its intended trajectory.

The Chang’e-5 mission, named after the ancient Chinese goddess of the moon, will seek to collect lunar material to help scientists understand more about the moon’s origins and formation. The mission will test China’s ability to remotely acquire samples from space, ahead of more complex missions.

State broadcaster CCTV, which ran live coverage of the launch, showed images of CNSA staff in blue uniforms applauding and cheering as they watched the spacecraft climbing through the atmosphere, lighting up the night sky.

If the mission is completed as planned, it would make China only the third country to have retrieved lunar samples, joining the United States and the Soviet Union.

Upon entering the moon’s orbit, the spacecraft is intended to deploy a pair of vehicles to the lunar surface: a lander and an ascender. The landing is due to take place in about eight days, according to Pei Zhaoyu, a spokesman for the mission. The probe is due to be on the lunar surface for about two days, while the entire mission is scheduled to take around 23 days.

The plan is for the lander to drill into the lunar surface, with a robotic arm scooping out soil and rocks. This material would be transferred to the ascender vehicle, which is due to carry it from the surface and then dock with an orbiting module.

The samples then would be transferred to a return capsule for the return trip to Earth, with a landing in China’s Inner Mongolia region.

“The biggest challenges … are the sampling work on the lunar surface, take-off from the lunar surface, rendezvous and docking in the lunar orbit, as well as high-speed re-entry to Earth,” said Pei, also director of the space administration’s Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center.

“We can conduct sampling through circumlunar and moon- landing exploration, but it is more intuitive to obtain samples to conduct scientific research – the method is more direct,” Pei added. “Plus, there will be more instruments and more methods to study them on Earth.”

China, which last year carried out the first landing on the far side of the moon and in July of this year launched a robotic probe to Mars, has other space goals in its sights. It aims to have a permanent manned space station in service around

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Kurt Ogilvie calls time on illustrious hockey career | Illawarra Mercury

news, latest-news, kiama, kurt ogilvie, hockey, moorebank, australia, kookaburras, Moorebank Liverpool District Hockey Club, retirement

ALTHOUGH his glittering hockey career didn’t end the way he wanted, Kurt Ogilvie is thankful for everyone that made the ride enjoyable. The 36-year-old Kiama resident called time on his competitive hockey career during the Sydney Premier League Hockey decider last month – as his Moorebank Liverpool District Hockey Club minor premiers side, featuring Shoalhaven trio Nick Jennings and Alex and Callum Mackay, lost 3-2 to the Norwest Strikers. “Like most sporting teams, 2020 was very challenging with the COVID-related interruptions and modifications but I was proud of the way the team had put the distractions aside and performed at a high level all season,” Ogilvie, whose side had gone 12 games unbeaten before the grand final, said. “We claimed the minor premiership, so it was certainly a successful regular season. Read more: Phoenix can play key role in Wollongong’s A-League rise: Timpano “In the final, we began the game very strongly but the opposition had done their homework and planned well, making a few tactical changes at quarter-time and half-time and we didn’t adapt. “While we certainly weren’t at our best, they produced a strong performance and deserved the win. “Naturally, I was disappointed to lose, as were my teammates because we hadn’t finished with the desired result but I couldn’t be too upset after the efforts of the group all year and reflecting back on the opportunities I’ve received through hockey. “I certainly got a bit emotional talking to our team later in the stands, as I thanked them for everything they had sacrificed and contributed to our time together.” As with the case of all athletes, Ogilvie, who’s been at Moorebank since 2003, had been wrestling with the idea of retirement for some time. “I made the decision to retire mid-season and was comfortable with it,” he said. “It had been in my mind the last couple of seasons but this was the first time I’d really felt at peace with stepping aside and moving on. “Previously the decision had been hard and I believe if I had retired earlier, I may have regretted it in some aspects but for years, I had known what level of commitment and preparation I had expected of teammates at the premier league level and I could no longer commit to that standard. “I needed to and wanted to spend more time and energy with my family, so ultimately I knew the decision was right for me.” Read more: United and Sharks shine in unpredictable Illawarra Premier League season This decision brought an end to more than 20 years in the sport, which all began with the University of Wollongong under 13s side. He got his first taste of senior hockey with Kiama, before he returned to UOW – who he went on to win close to 10 Illawarra premierships with. A short time later he started with Moorebank – where he won six Sydney first

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With A Pre-Election EO, Trump Is Again Pushing For Something He Calls ‘Patriotic Education’

On Election Day Eve, President Donald Trump signed an executive order underlining a central theme of his reelection campaign: Liberals want to indoctrinate America’s children. 

The order itself was a bit wordier, but it neatly echoed Trump’s closing message to voters on the campaign trail — that non-white politicians and left-wing ideologue educators wanted to create a new, unrecognizable country.

According to the document establishing “the President’s Advisory 1776 Commission” Monday, allegations that America is systematically racist “place rising generations in jeopardy of a crippling self-doubt that could cause them to abandon faith in the common story that binds us to one another across our differences.”

Huh? 

Trump’s been on this kick for months. In a speech at Mount Rushmore on July 4th, for example, he warned of “a new far-left fascism” in schools, in newsrooms and on corporate boards.

“If you do not speak its language, perform its rituals, recite its mantras, and follow its commandments, then you will be censored, banished, blacklisted, persecuted, and punished,” Trump said. 

Trump’s order makes four references to “patriotic education,” at one point defining the phrase as “the presentation of the history of the American founding and foundational principles, the examination of how the United States has grown closer to those principles throughout its history, and the explanation of why commitment to America’s aspirations is beneficial and justified.” 

The order attacked the “radicalized view of American history” that “has vilified our Founders” and which threatens to “erase the bonds that knit our country and culture together.”  

“Viewing America as an irredeemably and systemically racist country cannot account for the extraordinary role of the great heroes of the American movement against slavery and for civil rights — a great moral endeavor that, from Abraham Lincoln to Martin Luther King, Jr., was marked by religious fellowship, good will, generosity of heart, an emphasis on our shared principles, and an inclusive vision for the future,” the order said. 

The “1776 Commission,” per Trump’s order, will produce a report within a year “regarding the core principles of the American founding and how these principles may be understood to further enjoyment of ‘the blessings of liberty’ and to promote our striving ‘to form a more perfect Union.’”

But even in its name, the 1776 Commission appears to be part of Trump’s response to the 1619 Project, a New York Times Magazine package that examined the legacy of slavery in American history. 

New York University Professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat, an expert on authoritarianism, told TPM during a phone interview in September that the notion of teaching kids about the country’s racist past and how it bleeds into the present moment “goes against everything Trump has been in office to do, which is enact white hegemony.”

“It’s about shutting down certain conversations and allowing others,” Ben-Ghiat said. “Trump

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Former Bulldogs and Dragons veteran James Graham calls time on 18-year rugby league career

2020 will be the last year of James Graham’s illustrious rugby league career after the St. Helens veteran forward announced his retirement.

The 35-year-old will hang the boots up having played over 400 games across an 18-year career in the Super League and NRL, as well as 44 Tests for England.

Graham debuted with the Saints in 2003 and played 224 games for the club before shifting to the Canterbury Bulldogs in 2012.

MORE: Everything you need to know about State of Origin game one

The Englishman played 135 first grade games at Belmore and featured in the Bulldogs’ 2012 and 2014 grand final sides. He was named captain of the club in the 2015 season.

Graham then moved to the St. George Illawarra Dragons ahead of the 2018 season and played 52 matches across three seasons for the Red V, before gaining a release and returning to St. Helens midway through this season.

The fan-favourite front-rower retires a Man of Steel winner, three-time Challenge Cup winner and Super League grand finalist. 

“Playing for St Helens and over in the NRL has been an absolute honour. I am gutted this season will be my final one as a player, but I came to Saints saying I would have one last all in push for this season and nothing has changed there.

“Finishing my career at my boyhood Club was an opportunity that I couldn’t resist. Unfortunately, I am gutted we have not been able to play in front of our fans as I know they feel every pass, every tackle and every run. I have even missed the opposition fans who would give me a piece of their mind!

“I have had so many fantastic memories throughout my career here at Saints, in the NRL and on the International stage representing my country. It has all been a huge honour. I would like to thank all my family and friends who have supported me throughout my career and all the people involved from community clubs Thatto Heath and Blackbrook to people in the St Helens Academy as well as everybody involved at Canterbury Bulldogs and St George Illawarra Dragons.

“Now that all has been said, the season has not finished yet and my intention now is completing the job I came here to do with St Helens. We are going to take things a game at a time, moment by moment and give ourselves the best possible opportunity to finish the job.”

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Mixed Martial Arts: Dominant Khabib calls time on undefeated MMA career

FILE PHOTO: MMA – UFC 242 – Khabib Nurmagomedov v Dustin Poirier – Men’s UFC Lightweight title – Yas Island, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates – September 7, 2019 Khabib Nurmagomedov reacts after winning his match against Dustin Poirier REUTERS/Christopher Pike/File Photo

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Khabib Nurmagomedov called time on his mixed martial arts career following a second-round submission win over Justin Gaethje on Saturday, leaving his gloves in the centre of the octagon to fulfil a promise to his mother.

He wore down his opponent with his constant forward pressure before mounting Gaethje and locking him in a triangle choke that rendered the American unconscious to extend his record to 29 wins and no defeats.

Many questioned if he would have the heart for the fight against Gaethje following the death of his father Abdulmanap in July from complications caused by COVID-19 at the age of 57.

His father had schooled him in combat sports from an early age and was in his corner in Abu Dhabi in September 2019 when Khabib choked out Dustin Poirier, on that occasion using a rear naked choke in another successful title defence.

“I talked to my mother three days (ago). She didn’t want me to go fight without (my) father, but I promised her it’s going to be my last fight, and if I give my word, I have to follow this,” an emotional Khabib said in the octagon.

“It was my last fight. I know only one thing I want from the UFC – you guys have to put me number one pound-for-pound fighter in the world, because I deserve this.”

After a stunning run of 13 wins in eight years and a professional record featuring eight knockouts and 11 submission wins in his 29 victories, few would argue with the 32-year-old who has now left the cage for the last time.

Reporting by Philip O’Connor; Editing by Christian Radnedge

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Dominant Khabib calls time on undefeated MMA career

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Khabib Nurmagomedov called time on his mixed martial arts career following a second-round submission win over Justin Gaethje on Saturday, leaving his gloves in the centre of the octagon to fulfil a promise to his mother.



FILE PHOTO: UFC 242 - Khabib Nurmagomedov v Dustin Poirier - Men's UFC lightweight title


© Reuters/Christopher Pike
FILE PHOTO: UFC 242 – Khabib Nurmagomedov v Dustin Poirier – Men’s UFC lightweight title

He wore down his opponent with his constant forward pressure before mounting Gaethje and locking him in a triangle choke that rendered the American unconscious to extend his record to 29 wins and no defeats.

Many questioned if he would have the heart for the fight against Gaethje following the death of his father Abdulmanap in July from complications caused by COVID-19 at the age of 57.

His father had schooled him in combat sports from an early age and was in his corner in Abu Dhabi in September 2019 when Khabib choked out Dustin Poirier, on that occasion using a rear naked choke in another successful title defence.

“I talked to my mother three days (ago). She didn’t want me to go fight without (my) father, but I promised her it’s going to be my last fight, and if I give my word, I have to follow this,” an emotional Khabib said in the octagon.

“It was my last fight. I know only one thing I want from the UFC – you guys have to put me number one pound-for-pound fighter in the world, because I deserve this.”

After a stunning run of 13 wins in eight years and a professional record featuring eight knockouts and 11 submission wins in his 29 victories, few would argue with the 32-year-old who has now left the cage for the last time.

(Reporting by Philip O’Connor; Editing by Christian Radnedge)

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