Statistics on Adults Returning to College

Due to the economy these days, and the huge number of newly graduated youngsters, the job market is a fierce competitive monster to be reckoned with. Many older, more experienced, adults are using a return to school to add extra armor to their resume in an attempt to come out on top. But the process of making that return can be a long arduous fight all on its own.

Most employees over 35 have disadvantages they must tote along with them through their returning education years. They have families to care for, financial instability due to unemployment, or they contend with their unsatisfying job that they must cling to for dear life until they are able to earn that certification that will allow them to advance onto something greater. Battling all of these added troubles can be tiresome, but if you want something better for yourself, you have to make sacrifices.

Now, it seems that many older adults are returning to college and deciding to make those sacrifices. Some find ways to squeeze schooling into their already hectic lifestyle by waking up before dawn to study, or attending weekend, or online classes. Some other adults returning to college will take on a full workload during the day and then attend classes afterward for some nighttime college schooling.

Student admissions over the age of 35 have climbed in numbers, especially in the last 10 years. Adults returning to college now make up almost 20% of enrollment these days, which is double what it used to be when they were the young 18-year-old demographic. These days two in every five college students are older than 25.

Online colleges have become the best ally to older adults who wish to progress in the competitive workforce. About 75% of colleges offer online courses in the U.S. alone. The University of Phoenix Online boasts 63,000 students attending already with numbers rising. Adults returning to college to finish a bachelor’s degree or earn some type of certification tend to gravitate towards these types of methods because it allows them to attend a class at home while watching over their children, or allot their time given for school in a more convenient way.

The numbers on adults returning to college is on the rise, and it doesn’t seem to be slowing down anytime soon. Soon, the income gap between college graduates and non-grads will grow even larger and education will be more important than ever.…

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Recent MBA Graduates Without a Job – 10 Tips to Take Control of Your Career

So, you graduated with your MBA and have no full-time job waiting for you?

Before we dive right in, let me just congratulate you on earning your MBA degree. I know that it took a large effort on your part, possibly a sacrifice on many levels, and was also stressful, fun, exhausting, and fulfilling. Well done!

Graduation itself was probably a mix of happiness, relief, and even a little sadness because you were saying goodbye to some good friends.

Maybe there was also something else. You knew that many of your classmates had full-time job offers waiting for them in a few weeks or months, while you had/have nothing lined up.

This article is for you.

I am reaching out to you because I was you six years ago. I graduated from Kenan-Flagler Business School (UNC) with an MBA in marketing and had no job waiting for me after graduation. I was a career switcher (Wall St. to Marketing) and despite many parallels between the two career paths, many recruiters and companies were not seeing the connection and instead were only seeing limited marketing experience on my résumé.

Any of this sound familiar?

Also, I know the income is needed. You have expenses, possibly including new student loans. I get it. I moved back home after graduation. I certainly don’t have advice for every specific situation but what I do know is that you cannot get down on yourself or let negative thoughts creep in and impact your next move.

You have a lot of value to add to an organization and now you need to regroup and find a way in. Keep in mind that this may take several months or longer, however if you remain persistent and focused, you will overcome this minor setback.

Allow me to offer some advice based on either my personal experience or what I learned in hindsight. I hope they are a help to you.

1. Don’t compare yourself to your classmates

You don’t know what you don’t know. Everyone is in a different situation. For example, some of your classmates got their dream offer, some possibly took an offer and now have a hint of regret, some maybe took the first or only offer presented to them, while others are returning to the companies that they worked at before business school because they have to.

You don’t know everyone’s story and it doesn’t matter. Your classmates are starting their new journeys and so are you.

Wish them well and focus on your next steps.

2. Take care of yourself

· Exercise at least several times a week

· Eat well

· Get enough sleep

· Get outside

· Laugh. Read funny books; watch comedies or stand-up comedy

Looking for a new job is stressful and is even more difficult if you’re sick. Stay healthy.

3. Get together with people

Reach out to friends, former co-workers, or classmates for coffee or lunch. It’s great just to catch up and have a good conversation. …

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