High School Recruiting – Helpful Tips

On February 1 of every year, thousands of high school football athletes decide on which school they will continue their careers. Some players choose schools based off the prestige of the school, past success on the field, and sometimes the style of the jerseys. College coaches around the country have made promises to nearly every player and there is no way they can keep every promise that they have made. I will explain what a high school football prospect should consider when making his college football choice.

• First, a prospect should consider whether the school of his choice gives him a full ride scholarship. Financial aid is very important when considering a school. College is not cheap, even for a lesser-known school. A lot of universities’ tuitions are $10,000 or more a year, and not many people simply have thousands of dollars at their disposal.

• Furthermore, will this school help athletes reach their end goal? A player must do his research on the school, the coach, and the conference he will be playing in. He should know what percentage of players from this team, conference, and coach go off into the NFL and succeed. On the other hand, what percentage of former players, who did not go to the NFL, make it in their profession.

• A player should also consider playing time. many players in high school are considered the best at their school, and they do not know what sitting on the bench is like. Coaches promise players opportunities to start right away, but with so many players being told the same promise, someone must sit and wait his turn. As a player, he must sit down with his self and ask the question “will I start here?” Year after year, players transfer from one school because they did not get the chance to play, but in all actuality, they were not good enough to get on the field.

• The player should know what they are getting into. Each player should consider his own expectations for the school he is committing to. If a player is committing to Duke University, his expectation should be to win a conference title by the end of his college football career; he should not expect them to win a national title anytime soon. Some players’ expectations are too high for their school to achieve. Players need to have an open mind when it comes to their team winning “the big one.” If the player’s team has not won a conference title in over 50 years, what makes him think that they will break the trend when he is there. Be realistic.

• Lastly, a player should want to compete. On average, college football teams add about 25 new players each year to their rosters. Most will be on scholarship, while others will be walking onto the team fighting for a spot. High school players must know that the game has changed and they will need to keep up or …

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Forensic Science History

The "Eureka" legend of Archimedes (287-212 BC) can be considered an early account of the use of forensic science. In this case, by examining the principles of water displacement, Archimedes was able to prove that a certain crown was not made of gold, as it was being fraudulently claimed, by its density and buoyancy. The earliest account of using fingerprints to establish identity was during the 7th century AD. According to Soleiman, an Arabic merchant, a debtor's fingerprints were affixed to a bill, which would then be given to the lender. This bill was sinceforth, legally recognized as a proof of the validity of the debt.

The first written account of using medicine and entomology to resolve criminal cases is attributed to the book Xi Yuan Ji Lu, translated as "Collected Cases of Injustice Rectified", written in 1248 China by Song Ci (1186-1249). In one of the accounts, the case of a person killed with a sickle was solved by a death investigator who taught everyone to bring their sickles to one location. Flies, attracted by the smell of blood, eventually gathered only on a certain sickle. In the light of this, the murderer is always confused. The book also offered advice on how to distinguish between a drowning (water in the lungs) and strangulation (broken neck cartilage).

In sixteenth century Europe, medical practitioners in the army and university settings began to gather information on the cause and manner of death. Ambrose Paré, a French army surgeon, systematically studied the effects of violent death on internal organs. Two Italian surgeons, Fortunato Fidelis and Paolo Zacchia, laid the foundation of modern pathology by studying the changes that occurred in the structure of the body as a result of diseases. In the late 1700s, various writings on these topics begin to appear. These included – "A Treatise on Forensic Medicines and Public Health" by the French physicist Fodéré, and "The Complete System of Police Medicine" by the German medical expert Johann Peter Franck.

In 1775, a Swedish chemist by the name of Carl Wilhelm Scheele devised a way of detecting arsenic oxide, simple arsenic, in corpses, but only in large quantities. This investigation was expanded, in 1806, by a German chemist Valentin Ross, who learnt to detect the poison in the walls of a victim's stomach, and by English chemist James Marsh, who used chemical processes to confirm arsenic as the cause of death in an 1836 murder trial.

Two early examples of English forensic science in individual legal proceedings demonstrated the increased use of logic and procedure in criminal investigations. In 1784, in Lancaster, England, a person called John Toms, was tried and convicted for murdering Edward Culshaw with a pistol. When the dead body of Culshaw was examined, a pistol wad, basically crushed paper used to secure powder and balls in the muzzle, which was found in his head wound, matched perfectly with a torn newspaper found in Toms' pocket. In 1816, in Warwick, England, a farm laborer was tried …

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