What Is A Trade Career?

A trade career involves an individual having a set of specialized abilities. The skills may range from construction to HVAC to plumbing. While some of these individuals may hold associates, bachelors, or even masters degrees, the majority have usually attended a trade school, participated in an apprenticeship, and may have earned additional certification beyond the base qualifications. The examples below highlight the most common and well-known trade careers.

Electrician

Those who wish to enter into this field usually attend a vocational technical school, or participate in an apprenticeship program. Those who choose the apprenticeship program are also usually required to take part in a few courses in a classroom setting. The main skills these individuals will learn include testing, assembling, installing, inspecting, maintaining, and diagnosing different electrical systems, wiring, and components. As these individuals will frequently be near high voltage, instruction should also include detailed safety training.

HVAC

This acronym is short for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC). These individuals typically train at technical or trade schools, or partake in junior or community college course. Apprenticeship programs are also common, and typically take three to five years to complete. While in any program, these individuals should learn how to install, repair, and maintain equipment such as heating pumps, air conditioning, heating units, refrigeration, burners, electric motors, and boilers.

Construction Manager

This career is one that actually values experience over education. However, this fact exists for only earning this title, other than gaining construction manager certification, which is required at most job sites. This certification will prove an individual has experience in advanced construction and design. While in this career, these professionals typically opt to earn further certification in specialized areas, which allows their expertise and marketability to expand. Some may also earn a two to four degree in a relevant area such as construction engineering, building science, construction management, and construction science, among other similar areas.

Plumber

This trade career is probably the most widely recognized and remembered. Those who are interested in this career typically participate in an apprenticeship program, which will take approximately four to five years to complete. However, individuals may also enroll in technical or community colleges, which offer relevant programs or smaller courses in particular skills, such as taking apart a kitchen sink. In order to begin an apprenticeship, individuals must have first earned at least a high school diploma. A high score on the ACT in the math section may also improve acceptance into these programs.