Now More Than Ever Education is Important

In our great grandparents’ time, a high school education was considered sufficient, but those days are over. These days, a college degree is a goal that an increasing number of people are pursuing and it makes sense. The job market is more advanced and competitive than ever. An individual with a broad scope of job skills has the best chance of landing the most coveted positions.

Naturally, an education brings far more rewards than only financial success. A well-rounded education promotes thinking skills that improve our lives. Education makes us more aware so that we can better comprehend our world and value other cultures. It escalates our confidence to manage life’s challenges. Also, it can be entertaining; learning more about what interests you can add joy to your life despite your age. Besides, education promotes healthy brain function.

The Key to Financial Success

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, an individual with a bachelor’s degree can expect to earn an average of $2.1 million throughout their working life, while people with only a high school diploma can anticipate earning $1.2 million throughout their working life. This important difference in earning potential is predicted to widen even more in coming years, as more jobs necessitate some college education, if not a degree. People with a master’s degree can predict to earn $2.5 million throughout their lifetime, while those with a doctorate can foresee earning $3.4 million and those with a professional degree can anticipate earning $4.4 million.

College graduates are also less likely to be unemployed than those with less education. The need for college-educated employees is also anticipated to remain high. In 2006, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicted that between the years 2004 and 2014, 55 million jobs will be filled by entry-level workers. An estimated 13.9 million of these jobs will be filled by college-educated workers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also predicts that positions for college-educated workers will increase at a faster pace than positions for non-college grads.

Preparation for Life

Extra earning potential is not the only aspect drawing both traditional and non-traditional (adult) students to college in large numbers. College degrees in any major progress to better discipline and increased goal setting skills, and college degrees that focus on a number of liberal arts courses enhance a student’s personal development.

College-educated people are more likely to attain the dialectic level of reasoning. For example, they can evaluate two or more sides of an argument and devise a logical blend of these ideas. College grads have a more reasonable view of life and of social relationships than people who are unable to evaluate such scenarios. This can progress to a better ability to get along with peers.

Keep the Brain in Shape

There is also evidence that proves that education benefits the brain’s physical health. Studies have revealed that highly educated people are less likely to develop various forms of dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease. The foundation behind these claims is still unverified, but scientists do …

Changing Careers After 50 – Five Mistakes That Doom a Career Change!

You're approaching 50 or more and the career you've worked in you whole life is turning to dust. It could be the atmosphere in your work place taking a turn for the worse. Maybe the working conditions have changed, or your new boss is a jerk or sometimes the next manager up the line is impossible to talk to or combinations of all the negatives making the workplace and your career something you want to run away from.

In addition many of your interests have changed and you know you're not going to work out your career with this employer or perhaps even retire in this career. Well you're not alone; thousands every year in midlife not only change employers but move to another career as well.

Get the career change after 50 wrong and not only will you not advance but you may lose a critical year or two in the process. A career move to be successful must be carefully planned and managed. And like any important project each move must be analyzed and thought through with a built-in measure of flexibility.

Let's briefly review some of the more common mistakes many make in deciding on a career change after 50.

1. Lack of Thoughtful Study: Even though a career may fit your skill set and interests, if you fail to understand, for example, you hate to be micro-managed and most of the jobs in this career are tightly controlled from the top a career change will end in failure. Or depending you'll end up in worse shape that before the career changes.

As you research the proposed career field, do not neglect talking to those currently working in the field to get a proper feel for all aspects of the new career.

2. Failure to consider how your interests and skills were achieved: Rarely do your interests and skills move in linear fashion. You try something and then drop it. Your skills languish until you "get it." New interests come to the forefront, and so it goes.

If you continue keeping your eyes open and build and work your career plan; you'll be surprised many times as new opportunities and exactly the right career drops into your lap.

3. Only following the money: If you measure your care satisfaction totally based on your earnings you may miss the whole point of making a career change. Rather, you should focus on the overall impact the career change will have on you and your family and not purely on terms of income.

Career change based on only one of many factors could leave you more dissatisfied than before the move to another career. Add everything together and carefully consider the entire picture in you analysis and you'll make a better decision.

4. Lack of foresight and patience: Your current job and career seems to be so bad that you make the move before you have properly looked and analyzed the next step. More often than not, being employed and …

Manage Your Career-Six Steps to Follow

Manage Your Career. That's the advice I received early in my professional career. Manager your career or someone may manage it for you – and you might not like what they have planned.

Today, as I coach executives, managers and those who find their careers in transition, I always pass that advice on. Manage your career.

So how do you best manage your career? There are six basic steps to follow:

1. Inventory your career – regularly take stock and write down your significant accomplishments, training programs completed, jobs, education, and achievements. Focus on your contribution and value that you bring to your organization rather than the tasks you perform.

2. Have an updated resume – resumes are a must when looking for a new job, but they are a great tool to share with your boss during performance appraisal time, when going for a promotion or pay raise, or when applying for a position within your company. View the resume as your personal marketing piece – and once again, focus on achievements rather than tasks performed.

3. Know what makes you happy – jobs and career are a big part of your life so you might as well be happy doing it. And remember, job and career are two different things. A job is what we do to make money. A career is a passion, a professional focus. It's what excites you, challenges you, drives you. You know you've arrived when you get paid to work in your career field in a company that appreciates your unique contribution.

4. Network, network, network – successful people are good networkers and they do it often. Get out of the office and meet with different people. Join professional associations and take an active role. Build your Rolodex.

5. Stay current – no matter what your education or training, in a short period of time you'll find yourself falling behind if you're not regularly taking courses, attending trainings, and reading professional journals.

6. Get a professional coach or mentor – coaches can provide you needed advice and counsel in a safe environment. They are a sounding board for your ideas, an unbiased critic, the one who can give you a push when you're stuck. They assist with business issues or style issues and they'll help to strengthen your knowledge, performance, and image.

Imagine what it would be like to find yourself enjoying a successful career – doing what you want to do, where you want to do it, and getting paid well for doing it. Follow these six steps and your career will take off. Remember, only you can manage your career. …

The SAT

The SAT or Scholastic Assessment Test (formerly known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test), is a standardized test used by colleges and universities in the United States to help select incoming students. In the United States the SAT is published by the Educational Testing Service ( http://www.ets.org/ ) and administrated by the College Board. Virtually every college in America accepts the SAT or Subject Tests as a portion of its admissions procedure. Over two million students take the SAT annually.

Many students deem the SAT the most daunting test of their high school careers. It is a three-hour test that determines your potential academic success. Many colleges consider the SAT scores as a key factor in the admissions process. Some colleges consider your high school academic performance and extracurricular activities as important as standardized tests. If you are planning on going to college, you will need to take either SAT or ACT scores to complete the application process.

The SAT assesses verbal and math reasoning abilities that students would have developed through their school years. The test is multiple choice and is intended for students to demonstrate their math and verbal skills. The test is supposedly designed for all students without regard to any differences in education or schooling. According to the College Board ([http://www.collegeboard.com/]), the test looks for a student's ability to understand and analyze written material, to drawferences, to differentiate shades of meaning, to draw conclusions and resolve math problems. These types of skills are necessary for future academic achievement and success in the work. …

Careers & Employment Information

There are excellent careers and employment opportunities available to recent graduations at universities across the country. These graduates will find these positions using the careers & employment information that is posted on many Internet employment websites.

These graduates will begin to suspect that a great career is ahead of them, when they see the pay scales offered in some of the careers and employment information that they see. Some of these young graduates may not be altogether familiar with what a yearly salary should be in their field, and will take the employees and employment information about pay and benefits when they are first offered, without giving it a second thought.

There are many companies that are listed on these employment websites, and all of them are interested in hiring people with stellar qualifications, and they are clearly focused on getting them hired with their company at the lowest salary price possible. They are not concerned with the practitioners and employment opportunities that these people have dreamed of for such a long time.

These employment office hiring specialist are interested in the employment information that is contained on their resumes though. They are looking for the best value return on their hiring dollars, and generally prefer to hire people with a lot of experience in the position that they are hiring for.

Many of these career opportunities can be found using the search engines that are offered on many Internet websites. If a person is interested in working for a Government agency, then all of them would need to find the government website that lists all of the careers and employment information for the positions that they are hiring for.

The career information that Government agencies list may be very brief in nature and may seem incomplete. Government hiring agencies will generally list the date that the position became opened, and will also provide the closing date that it will use to determine the last day that applicants can send in their applications.

A position description is normally part of the employment description that is provided on a Government job notice. Any other pertinent requirement to make a suitable application will also be listed in the careers & employment information on the Government website.

Some of the information provided on Government job announcements will also provide preferences for military service too. These are definitely good paying positions of employment and the careers and employment information is always read completely before an interview. …

How to Write a Career Objective Statement in Your Resume

Writing a career objective is an integral part of any job resume. In fact most employers will want to know about it more than anything else. If your career objective is well articulated and is in tune with the employer's needs, you stand a better chance of being hired. Career objective is but one of the many elements that institute a well written resume.

Before you sit down to write your career objective it is important to understand what it is. In short it can be defined as a personal statement that articulates what you wish to attain during work.

  • It's Personal: There are many others who might have similar goals, but make it more relevant to your objectives in life – say what you are comfortable with and how you plan to achieve them.
  • It's a Commitment: By stating your objectives in clear terms, you are able to identify who you are and how much you are determined to achieve them. If it closely linked to your employer's needs; all the better for you.
  • It's Action-oriented: By having an objective, you are able to take control of your life. You do not get swayed away by occasional moods or get distracted by seemingly more lofty ideals.
  • It's Directional: Clear objective help you keep moving in a focused direction. It will help you get information, plan for your future (and you employer's) more objectively.
  • It's Specific: Career objective must be very specific and convey a clear message to the readers. Generalizing your objectives is a pitfall you should avoid. Some broad terms like "challenging" or "successful" should be avoided; they are not relevant nowdays.

There are 5 major elements you can include in your career objective –

  1. Career Field: You can write about the major industry in which you would like to work – aviation, software, medical and retailing are some sectors that you can refer to in general terms.
  2. Position Field: If you wish to have a little more elaborate, you can consider talking about your design you would like to attain. This particularly important if you are applying for a specific job position.
  3. Organizational Field: If you have any specific preference in which sector you would like to build you career, you should consider including it here. Usually there are two major types – service sector (includes education, banking, communications, aviation, shipping etc.) or manufacturing sector (includes car manufacture, shipbuilding etc).
  4. Functional Area Field: Here you can mention about the role you would like to play – technical, marketing, administrative, management and planning are some of the functional areas you will want to mention.
  5. Skills Field: Here you can tell something about the skills you have acquired in your previous employment, and the future plans for acquiring newer skills. The most common words you can use in writing include – administrative, human relations, management and so on.

It is not always a necessity to include all the elements in your career objective statement. Normally 3 should suffice, but …

Tips for Success During College

1. Taking a year off before starting college usually does not work; “find yourself” during the Summer after you graduate from high school. The best time to start and complete college is between the ages of 18 and 22. It is more difficult to start and complete college after these ages, because your responsibilities increase as you become older

2. Understand the number of classes and credits that you will need to graduate, and spread them over the number of semesters it will take for you to graduate; typically 8 semesters over 4 years. Note, some colleges refer to “units” and “semester hours”, instead of “classes” and “credits”. If you take classes during the Summer, you can lighten your load during the school year or graduate early. Note also, an increasing number of students are completing college over 5 years, instead of the customary 4 years.

3. Do not wait until the last minute to schedule your classes.

4. When choosing classes, take one tough class, two moderate classes, and one easy class; do not bury yourself by taking all difficult classes in a semester.

5. Spread your classes over at least 4 days per week. This will typically spread out your final exams. You want to avoid having to take multiple final exams on a given day.

6. Ask other students about their experiences with professors, and keep a list of the good and bad professors. Professors are also rated on the internet. Avoid the bad professors.

7. When scheduling classes, be cognizant of the location of such classes. You do not want to have to hurry between classes to avoid being late.

8. Get your books ahead of time whenever possible.

9. At the beginning of each semester, schedule all projects and exams; stay organized throughout each semester; utilize a written or electronic planner.

10. Turn your phone off while attending class, and while studying.

11. Spread your homework over seven days. Do not fall behind with your homework.

12. Review your class notes every evening, and add to them when necessary.

13. Before submitting papers, use the spell check on your computer and fully justify your papers.

14. Professors typically make themselves available during office hours, do not be scared to ask for help.

15. Do not skip classes; the professors usually emphasize the material that will be on the exams.

16. Some professors make available old exams at the library, or online; look at them when available.

17. When studying for an exam, study the material that you do not know, instead of the material that you do know. Do not always review the material from the oldest chapter to the newest chapter. Once in a while, start with the newest chapter and work backwards.

18. Two weeks prior to your final exams, your entire focus should be on completing your final papers and studying for such exams.

19. Prior to starting your first answer on any exam, quickly scan the entire exam so you can …

Types of Online College Nursing Degrees

There are many types of online college nursing degrees out there. The education of a regular RN is never ending either. Many of the online college nursing degrees are out there to help further and advance their education, and to help serve their patients better in the medical field. Some job positions are even required to have a certain degree in order to have the position. Taking these online college nursing degree courses can be beneficial as well especially to the already working nurses who want to advance in their career. Online they can go at their own pace and work it into their own busy schedules.

Online College Nursing Degrees

Master of Science (MS) in Nursing and Special Education: This program is approved by the American Nurses Association. The course available at Walden University and you get your Master's of Science degree in nursing and teaching so you can teach future nurses.

RN to BS in Nursing (BSN): This course is for continuing education for the already RNs who have already gotten their association of degree and hospital diploma. Taking this course will give them a chance to earn their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). This Course is available at Walden University as well and University of Phoenix.

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN): Here your Master's in Nursing can be earned to become a Registered Nurse. Course available at University of Phoenix.

(MSN) RN Track – Informatics: Available at Walden University this is for RN to expand their knowledge on blending technology and science along with nursing to help improve their patient care.

PHD in Nursing- This degree course is for Certified Nurses to help prepare them to take their master's degree.

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) / Master of Health Administration: This is a duel course in which you will earn your MSN as well business skills too to help further their career.

LPN to RN: This is online degree program is where an LPN and get their Masters or Associates in Nursing degree to become an RN.

LPN to BSN: A course for LPN nurses to earn their Bachelor's of Science in nursing which is needed to become a Registered Nurse.

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) / Nurse Family Practitioner- This is a course for a nurse to get their MSN and also learn skills to become a Nurse Family Practitioners. …