Is College Education Worth It?

Today, with increasing expenses, people find themselves asking, “Why should I go to college? Is it even worth it?” Yes, college is expensive. Yes, it requires a few years of your time that most think they would rather spend working. But the truth, and the ultimate reason why a college education is worth it, is that it is the key to a happier, more secure future.

Some people don’t see the need to get a college education. They think that as long as they work hard and are talented enough, they can make a good living without having to worry about student loans and ‘wasting’ precious time. While there is nothing really wrong with a person being hard-working and sincere without having a college degree, it is worth mentioning that a college education will only supplement your knowledge, provide a strong foundation for your future and give you something to rely on when times are tough.

Let’s take a look at what makes a college education worthwhile.

Better opportunities and a stable career – While many might consider this as an ‘obvious’ benefit, the truth is not everyone realizes what it implies. Not only is it easier to find a job with a college degree, but employers are also willing to pay higher salaries to those with a college education. People with college education are likely to progress in the future with promotions and salary hikes. Studies have shown that most people are disgruntled with their current work situation because they want to improve their financial situation and even though they have years of work experience, lack of a college degree keeps them from getting there.

Experience and life skills – Going to a college helps develop important skills that are relevant to your career such as technical expertise, communication skills and theoretical and practical knowledge. But that isn’t all. College education will go a long way in shaping you as a young adult capable of thinking rationally, planning ahead, analyzing difficult situations and making decisions. It is through college that you are exposed to people from different walks of life, sharing the same views and interests as you. You imbibe values and life lessons from your surroundings. In college, you start to envision the life you want for yourself.

Growth and development – When you are in college, you might have to take on a part time job to bring in extra money. During this time you learn to juggle between college and earning money and maintaining a social life. This phase in your life teaches you the importance of money and the value of time. You go through a series of changes emotionally and mentally that finally shapes you into a young adult.

Confidence and personal satisfaction – We live in a world of stiff competition where everyone wants to get ahead in their lives. A college education gives you the confidence to face the world head on.

So what about those who want to work and study? …

The SAT

The SAT or Scholastic Assessment Test (formerly known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test), is a standardized test used by colleges and universities in the United States to help select incoming students. In the United States the SAT is published by the Educational Testing Service ( http://www.ets.org/ ) and administrated by the College Board. Virtually every college in America accepts the SAT or Subject Tests as a portion of its admissions procedure. Over two million students take the SAT annually.

Many students deem the SAT the most daunting test of their high school careers. It is a three-hour test that determines your potential academic success. Many colleges consider the SAT scores as a key factor in the admissions process. Some colleges consider your high school academic performance and extracurricular activities as important as standardized tests. If you are planning on going to college, you will need to take either SAT or ACT scores to complete the application process.

The SAT assesses verbal and math reasoning abilities that students would have developed through their school years. The test is multiple choice and is intended for students to demonstrate their math and verbal skills. The test is supposedly designed for all students without regard to any differences in education or schooling. According to the College Board ([http://www.collegeboard.com/]), the test looks for a student's ability to understand and analyze written material, to drawferences, to differentiate shades of meaning, to draw conclusions and resolve math problems. These types of skills are necessary for future academic achievement and success in the work. …