Why Goal Achievement * IS * Rocket Science After All!

You will hear and read the following often when people talk about goal achievement – 'It's a simple theory to follow, it's not rocket science!'

I say and write it myself all the time, and I believe it, I have done for over 20 years, and have used it to great effect in my life.
I write about the theories in my book 'Transform Your Life in 21 Days!', So why would I write this article saying that goal achievement * is * in fact rocket science after all?

Ooh, good question, and here's the answer …

Simply because we can look to the exploration of space (rocket science) to find an almost endless flow of goal achievement nuggets.
The recently revived US Space Shuttle Progamme is great to watch.
Now they show the whole mission streamed live online, so you get to see all the daily mundane workings of the astronauts as well as the more spectacular stuff.

In December 2006 the shuttle discovery docked with the International Space Station, and although the shuttle only stayed a few days, they dropped a crew member, Sunita Williams, to start her 6 month stay at the station.

Yes, 6 months in space!

As I was following her progress, I was fascinated to learn that she has to do 2 hours of exercise a day.
1 hour of cardio work, and 1 hour of weight work.

This is not to turn her into a superhuman, it's just to keep up with the rest of us back here on Earth.

Because of her zero gravity environment, Williams' muscles, including heart, lungs, legs, arms, etc, will not be taxed anything like as much as they are to just move about in the gravity we feel here.

If she did not exercise, over 6 months, she would be in a bad way on her return home, she just would not be strong enough to walk or do the simple functions we take for granted.

Here her 2 hours a day.

Now, an absolute classic tip in the field of goal achievement is to give 1 solid hour a day working on your goal.
If you do this, you will make leaps and bounds you had not thought possible.
The reason for this is that most people simply * do not * commit this time.
An hour a day adds up to 7 hours a week (I kept up at school!), And you can get a lot done in 7 hours.

So, as you work toward your goal, think of Suni Williams in space.
As I write this, Jan 4th 2007, she gives 2 hours solid every day – not to make progress, but just to keep up with the rest of us!
She'll continue to do it every day for 6 months!

That's impressive in my book, and she can do it, imagine what you could achieve with 2 hours a day for 6 months!
Can not find 2 hours every day?
Stick to the …

Science Fair Project Ideas – Winning Projects Start With the Right Topic

It takes a lot of work to come up with a science experiment that will really impress the judges. While the choices for science fair projects are endless, it does take some planning to come up with the perfect topic that will result in a project that shows well for judging.

One thing that is important to consider when picking a topic is the skill level of the student. An experiment that is too difficult will be hard for the child to successfully complete. Even if the project is done well, if the child does not understand the concepts behind the experiment, it will be evident to the sentences during the science fair.

Careful planning is important in choosing an appropriate science fair project, also. Do not decide on a topic that will take 3 weeks to implement and finish if there is only one week before the experiment is due. Be sure to have all the items needed, or know for sure that you can get them before deciding on a topic.

Children are naturally curious about things. Use this quality in kids to think of an idea that will appeal to your child and their interests. If your child has always been interested in weather, think of an idea that will go along with this interest.

The possibilities for science fair project ideas are unlimited. Take the time to plan ahead and choose the best experiment for your child. The extra time spent in preparation will show when the project is finished. The judges will be sure to be impressed. …

Computer Based Education System

Computers and communication technology continue to make an ever-increasing impact on all levels, education and training from primary to secondary and for distance learning. The computers in education are designed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the educational process. Online education has revolutionized the education industry.

Computer managed instruction and curriculum integration are inevitable for educational purposes with the advancement of latest technology. It is important to integrate technology into classroom curriculum to organize resources. Reading and Language Arts, Social Science, Science and Mathematics are the main subjects to be integrated in curriculum.

Issues in educational computing are diversified, having legal issues, ethical issues along with a need to tackle with cyber crime hackers. For this purpose, the educational institutions need to ensure the safety on net. Effective network and telecommunication is an essential requirement for classrooms and laboratory. It is the part and parcel of the school curricula as the computer technology forms a deep impact in the modern education system.

The advantages of computers in education include an efficient storage and rendition of information, quick information processing and very importantly saving of paper! Home works and assignments submitted as soft copies save paper.In the modern era, the students find it easier to refer to the internet than searching for information in reference books. Today, the process of education has gone beyond learning from prescribed books. Moreover, its easier to store information on computers than maintaining hand-written notes! Thus we can say text-books versus computer teaching!

The computer technology has made the dream of distance learning into a reality! Education is no more limited to classrooms but it has reached far and wide. Internet plays an important role in education. The information on various subjects can be found to be taught to the students on internet. Computer facilitates an effective presentation of information. Software like Power-Point, and animation software are of great help to the teachers while delivering information.

Audio-Visual representation of information makes the process of learning interesting and interactive. Electronically erasable memory devices can be used repeatedly. It thus eases the process of learning.

Today, computer is an essential part in every industry. Life without computers would be unimaginable! It is evident that they are no more limited to software industry but computers are widely used in networking, information access, data storage and the processing of information. Therefore, IT experts recommend early introduction of computers in education for early childhood development stage because it lays a strong foundation of most of the major competitive careers.

Computers play a significant role in one’s personal and professional life.…

All These Worlds Are Yours – The Appeal of Science Fiction

I've been fascinated with science fiction stories for as long as I can remember, though, I must confess, I never thought of science fiction as being mainstream literature. I, like many readers, pursed science fiction as a form of escapism, a way to keep up with speculation on recent scientific discoveries, or just a way to pass the time.

It was not until I met with my thesis adviser to celebrate the approval of my paper that I had to think about science fiction in a new light. My adviser works for a large, well-known literary foundation that is considered to be very "canonical" in its tastes. When he asked me if I liked science fiction, and if I would be willing to select about one hundred stories for possible inclusion in an anthology that they were thinking about producing, I was somewhat surprised. When he told me it might lead to a paying gig, I became even more astounded. I went home that afternoon feeling very content: my paper had been approved, and I might get a paying job to select science fiction, of all things.

Then it hit me: I'd actually have to seriously think about some sort of a method to select from the thousands of science fiction short stories that had been written in the past century. When I considered that the ideals of the foundation would have to be reflected in the stories which I selected, something near panic set in: science fiction was not part of the "cannon."

"While I pondered weak and weary, over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore," I reached a decision: I'd first try to figure out what science fiction "was," and then I'd develop a set of themes that related to the essence of science fiction. So, armed with this battle plan, I proceeded to read what several famous authors had to say about science fiction. This seemed simple enough, until I discovered that no two authors thought science fiction meant quite the same thing. Oh, great, thought I: "nevermore." (Sorry, Edgar, I could not resist).

Having failed to discover the essence of science fiction, I selected four authors which work I liked to try to determine what they contributed to the art of science fiction. The authors were: Isaac Asimov, Robert Silverberg, Orson Scott Card, and Arthur C Clarke. At the time, I did not realize that two of the authors, Asimov and Clarke were considered "hard" science fiction writers, and the other two, Silverberg and Card, were considered "soft" science fiction writers.

So, you might ask: what is the difference between "hard" and "soft" science fiction. I'm glad you asked, else I would have to stop writing right about now. "Hard" science fiction is concerned with an understanding of quantum sciences, such as astronomy, physics, chemistry, etc. "Soft" science fiction is often associated with the humanities or social sciences, such as sociology, psychology or economics. Of course, some writers blend "hard" and "soft" science …

What You Should Know About ACT

There comes a time in every college bound person's life when they ask the questions "What is the ACT and how does it affect my future"?

A national college admission examination, the ACT consists of subject area tests in English, mathematics, reading, and science plus an optional writing exam.

Originally, "ACT" stand for American College Testing. However, in 1996 the official name of the organization was shorted to simply "ACT" to better reflect the broad array of programs and services offered beyond college entrance testing.

There are three good reasons to take the ACT:

1. The ACT tests are universally accepted for college admission.

2. The ACT is not an aptitude or an IQ test. Instead, the questions on the ACT are directly related to high school courses in English, mathematics, and science.

3. In addition to the tests, the ACT also provides test takers with a unique interest inventory that provides valuable information for career and educational planning and a student profile section that provides a comprehensive profile of high school work and future plans.

In the US, the ACT is administrated on five national test dates in October, December, February, April, and June. In selected states, the ACT is also offered in late September.

The ACT tests are prepared according to the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, & National Council on Measurement in Education (1985); Code of Professional Responsibilities in Educational Measurement, National Council on Measurement in Education (1995); and Code of Fair Testing Practices in Education, Joint Committee on Testing Practices (1988).

People of all ages and grade levels are eligible to take the ACT. This includes junior high or middle school students and those who have already graduated from high school.

The test includes 215 multiple-choice questions in four subject areas: English-75 questions; Math-60 questions; Reading-40 questions; and Science-40 questions. Plus one writing prompt in the optional writing portion.

There are no limits on how many times you can take the ACT, although there are restrictions on how frequently you can do so. For example, you can test only once per national or state test date, or if you test through non-national testing such as special testing, you must wait a minimum of 60 days between retests. Many students take the test twice, once as a junior and again as a senior.

You should definitely consider retesting if you had any problems during the test, such as misunderstanding the directions or not feeling well. You may also want to consider retesting if you are not satisfied that your scores accurately represent your abilities.

Retesting may be a good idea if you see a discrepancy between your ACT scores and your high school grades, or if you have completed coursework or an intensive review in the subject areas included in the ACT since you were tested. Research shows that of the students who took the ACT more than once 55% increased their Composite score on the retest. If you …

The Emerging Science of Positive Psychology

Traditional Psychology

Since WWII, human sciences such, and particularly psychology, have been mostly concerned with fixing psychological disorders. Let's call it the abnormal. Because psychology reckoned the greatest contribution it could make was in the field of disorders, it followed the medical model. The clients were called patients.

Knowledge generation was mainly about non-copying people, their issues and how to help them from not-coping to coping / being OK. When a person got to the point where he copes, psychology lost interest, because the 'mission was successfully completed'.

Knowledge generation was mainly about non-copying people, their issues and how to help them from not-coping to coping / being OK. When a person got to the point where he copes, psychology lost interest, because the 'mission was successfully completed'.

The dilemma is that majority of people are OK and they do cope. Little proven knowledge sought to assist in getting even better – from being OK to being great.

Emerging Positive Psychology

Positive Psychology then emerging. It aims at Personal Well-being and how to achieve it, ie how to get from only being OK to being great.
I see the paradigm shift described in the notice that when a person becomes great, pettiness of symptoms disappear in the background.
Positive psychology is a new science. It got momentum only after 2000. Its official birth was thought about in 1998 Dr Martin Seligman, chairman of the most influential body of psychology, the American Psychological Association (APA). The APA is the engine room of the psychology fraternity worldwide.

One can argue that, since ancient times, philosophers, religious leaders and even contemporary thoughts about what makes people great. It is true, but now we have science to research these questions for us.
Vive! 'S roots are planed in the soil of Positive Psychology focusing on building existing strengths. The focus is definitely not on troubleshooting one's weaknesses. It aims at releasing positive forces within a person that traditional self-improvement programs have note yet come to grips with. These forces become the vehicle of Vive! 'S mental makeovers.
We are privileged to bring to you well-being stuff that has been tested and that can definitely make a positive difference in your life!
What is Personal Well-Being?

Personal Well-being is a collective term referring to a subjective sense of feeling good; experimenting positive emotions. It encompasses a positive perception of oneself, having a positive approach to life, a sense being fulfilling and experiencing that my life has meaning. It focuses on having peace of mind, being content and living authentically.
Personal well-being is the result of effective living where the following powers are unleashed and cultivated:

* The power of purpose and meaning-giving goals,

* The power of hope,

* The power of creativity and authenticity,

* The power of continuous reality negotiation,

* The power of love, compassion and empathy-altruism,

* The power of forgiveness and gratitude,

* The power of operating in one's Zone of Unique Excellence – 'Flow',

* The power of wisdom, …

5 Universities To Pursue Engineering Courses In Pakistan

Are you planning of pursuing an engineering course in Pakistan? There are many Universities in the country where you can pursue your dream course. Some of the best institutions that you can attend include:

Air University

This is a public research University that is located in Islamabad and Multan. The institution was established in 2002 and over the years it has become one of the most reputable institutions of higher learning.

In fact, it was recently ranked among the most notable universities in Engineering and Technology. Some of the notable engineering courses that you can study in the University include: mechanical, mechatronics, electrical, aerospace, avionics, communication systems, and control systems engineering.

University Of Central Punjab

It’s popularly known as UCP and it’s a private University that is located in Lahore, Pakistan. The institution was established in 1996 and over the years it has grown to become one of the most popular universities in Lahore. Currently the University has over 8,000 students.

There are many engineering courses that you can take in the institution. Some of the courses include: electrical, computer, data communication, electrical machine and telecommunication engineering.

University Of Engineering and Technology, Peshawar

It’s located in Peshawar, Pakistan and one of the most reputable universities in the country. The institution is widely known for its civil engineering programs which are heavily involved with the research of earthquakes.

The good thing with the institution is that it offers undergraduate, post-graduate and doctoral programs in engineering; therefore, regardless of your level you will definitely find a place in the institution.

NED University of Engineering and Technology

It’s a public University and one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in Pakistan. It’s popular for its strong emphasis in science and technology. It was founded in 1922 and offers many types of engineering courses such as: civil, bio medical, mechanical and manufacturing, computer, and chemical and process engineering.

Balochistan University of Engineering and Technology

It’s a public institution offering different types of engineering courses. Some of the courses that it offers include: civil, information technology, computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering.

Conclusion

These are some of the best engineering universities where you can pursue your dream-engineering course. It’s good to note that the different institutions have different admission dates and criteria. All you need to do is your research and find the admission dates and criteria for the institution where you want to study.…

Today in Science Class – Instilling Christian Values ​​in Today's Children

What do you do when your child comes home from school and questions questions about God versus what he learned today in science class? It's normal for kids to question beliefs and values ​​and it's difficult to counter the information that's being fed to them every day in public schools.

Christian educator, David Millette, has written a brave new book, Today in Science Class: Ben's Big Bang Botheration, that will help children and parents in the quest to retain Christian values ​​in the home.

Ben's Big Bang Botheration is the first in the Today in Science Class series and deals with the issue of Creation and the Big Bang theory. Middle school student, Ben, loves science and has always enthusiastically studied class subjects. But laTely, Ben's teacher has been presenting the theory that everything on earth just happened and was not created by God. These teachings are completely opposite from those that his parents and church says are true – and Ben wishes answers.

Out of Ben's questions and search for the truth comes an understanding that God is the most logical explanation for the creation of our universe. Children who read Ben's Big Bang Botheration will be engaged in lively thoughts and conversations throughout the book and will begin to understand the concepts presented in school and at home.

The first half of each Today in Science Class book is written in story form and dedicated to children readers. The second half is specifically written to help parents and teachers understand what children of middle-school and teens are being taught in our schools and how to counteract the influence of those teachings.

Millette's promise is that parents must become their children's primary educators and be prepared to teach them why the theories that they're being taught in school are not correct. This can not be done through brow-beating or a "because I said so …" attitude. Parents must be armed with facts and the educated ability to sit down with their children and have meaningful conversations about God.

Millette has laid an impressive foundation in the first book of the Today in Science Class series – Ben's Big Bang Botheration. When a child believes the first five words of the Bible: "In the beginning, God created …," he has all the foundation he'll need to with the concepts and theories presented to him through his education process – and beyond. That's the focus of Milete's series.

David Millette's books may be the answer to our worries about the persuasion that schools have in our children's lives and a guide as to how we can maintain a stronger influence to help them grow into Christian men and women. Today in Science Class: Ben's Big Bang Botheration, is an excellent resource for parents and each future book will address a particular theory presented in schools and guidance for parents when their children come home with questions. …

The Law in South Africa

The primary sources of South Africa law were Roman-Dutch mercantile law and personal law with English Common law, as imports of Dutch settlements and British colonialism. The first European law in South Africa was brought by the Dutch East India Company and is called Roman-Dutch law. It was imported before the codification of European law into the Napoleonic Code and is comparable in many ways to Scottish law. This was followed in the 19th Century by British law both common and statutory. Starting in 1910 with unification, South Africa had its own parliament which passed laws specific for South Africa, building on those previously passed for the individual member colonies.

Roman Dutch law is a legal system based on Roman law as applied in the Netherlands in the 17th and 18th century. As such, it is a variety of the European continental Civil law or Ius commune. While Roman Dutch law ceased to be applied in the Netherlands themselves already at the beginning of the 19th century, Roman Dutch law is still being applied today by the courts of South Africa and Sri Lanka.

While Roman law was mostly forgotten in the early middle ages, interest in the doctrines of Roman jurists returned when – around the year 1070– a copy of the digest of Emperor Justinian I was found in Italy. Scholars in the emerging university of Bologna started to study the Roman texts and to teach law based on these texts. Courts gradually started to apply Roman law –as taught in the university of Bologna (and soon elsewhere) because the sentences felt that the recognized legal concepts of Roman law were more apt to resolve complex cases than the Germanic laws, which had been in use before Roman law was revived. This process (the reception of Roman law) took place in Italy and then in the rest of continental Europe.

In 15th century, the process reached the Netherlands. While Italian jurists were the first to contribute to the new science of law based on the Roman texts, in the 16th century, French lawyers were most influential. In the 17th and 18th century, the leading rôle was passed on to the legal science in the Netherlands. Members of the so-called school of elegant jurisprudence included Hugo Grotius, Johannes Voet, Ulrich Huber and many others. These schools managed to merge Roman law with some legal concepts taken from the traditional Germanic customary law of the Netherlands, especially of the province of Holland. Thre resulting mixture was predominately Roman, but it contained some features which were characteristically Dutch. This mixture is known as Roman Dutch law. The Dutch introduced the legal system of their state to their colonies. In this way, the Dutch variety of the European Ius commune came to be applied in South Africa and Sri Lanka.

In the Netherlands, the history of Roman Dutch law ended, when the kingdom of the Netherlands adopted the French Code civil in 1809. However, Roman Dutch law was not replaced by French …

The History of Hydroponic Plant Cultivation

Hydroponic growing is a system of cultivating plants that uses mineral rich water rather than soil. Put simply the plant roots are placed in a water solution; this helps to reduce the costs of water, allows for control over the nutrients that are fed to the plants and also produces high, stable yields and makes it easier to control pests and diseases. It has been used in bio medicine, within food production and even by NASA. But what are the origins of hydroponic science?

The history of hydroponic science can be traced back nearly four hundred years. In the archives of the British library is the earliest known publication on the subject of growing plants without using soil. Published in 1627, Sylva Sylvarum was authored by Sir Francis Bacon and sparked interest in the technique. The next scientist to take the baton was John Woodward who experimented with growing spearmint in distilled and impure water; he found that plants in impure water greater better than those in distilled.

Two hundred years later German botanists developed a technique called solution culture. This was a type of cultivation that used no soil and instead used a mineral solution. Solution culture is still used as a hydroponic technique today. Hydroponics first received its name after the work of Professor William Frederick Gericke, who in 1929 began experimenting with the technique for agricultural production. After first choosing aquaculture, a term already being used for the cultivation of water borne plants he determined upon hydroponics, an analogous term referring to geoponics, the science of cultivating earth.

Gericke however attempted to keep the discovery to himself, leading to him leaving the University of California. Two of his associates, Dennis Hoagland and Daniel Arnon then began their own research. The result was a book on the hydroponic subject although both Hoagland and Arnon did not believe that the technique was a more productive way to produce plants, overlooking the fact that botanists have greater control over oxygen, water and nutrients in a hydroponic environment. The pair did however develop a number of nutrient formulas that are still used today.

The first practical usage and success of hydroponics was in the 1930s where the science was used to grow vegetables on Wake Island, a rocky South Pacific atoll that had no soil. From this point onwards the science has been regularly advanced, even being used by NASA to a study how plants could be grown using LED light in any possible missions to Mars. …