Career Satisfaction – What Does It Mean To You? What Do You Need To Be Happy At Work?

You want to love your job, you want to have career satisfaction, but have you ever taken the time to think about what career satisfaction means to you? This article outlines the main reasons why people feel satisfied with their job. So read through each of these 8 areas, and decide if they are being met in your job (or not).

Do you need mentally challenging work? Some people like to daydream on the job and not be bothered with mental challenge – they work to pay the bills while their out of work life gives them the satisfaction they need. Glen is a postman and also plays in a couple of folk bands. He can not make enough money to survive through music, he's tried it, so the delivery work pays the bills and gives him the time to practice and compose. Most people, however, crave some intellectual stimulation during their working day. They seek challenge but it should be just enough so that they can meet it successfully, too much challenge can be stressful.

Does your work need to be personally interesting? Our interests differ – what do you prefer? Being outside and working on practical tasks? Problem solving? Being part of a team? If someone is interested in the arts, do they want to work for an arts organization or do they want to keep work separate? Lisa loved embroidery, and spends most evenings on this, but a job in an embroidery shop was not as fulfilling as she had hoped, and resolved in her not wanting to do more of the same in the evenings.

What sort of physical demands is right for you? Vicki is so interested in health and fitness that a job as a personal trainer and running aerobic exercise classes was perfect for her. Dan loves working on a farm, being outside and doing heavy work keeps him fit and he would hate to be in an office job. However, Derek, whose work involved a lot of international travel, found that flying across continents, dealing with the time difference and waiting at airports was too stressful and he wanted to be able to concentrate on the job, rather than have to deal with the stress of travel.

Do you want your work to be seen as valuable? Do you need to feel that you are doing a worthwhile job and making a difference? Is it important what other people think of your job and the organization you work for? Denise recognized that certain consulting assignments did not give her a feeling of making a difference so she decided to concentrate on working with individuals where she got immediate feedback from her clients on the value of her work.

How important are collections to you? Do you need to work with people that you get on with and who are team players, willing to help out and give you recognition and support? Or does working with 'difficult' people give you some sort of …

Gender Differences In Learning Style Specific To Science, Technology, Engineering And Math – Stem

There are gender differences in learning styles specific to science, math, engineering and technology (STEM) that teachers of these subjects should keep in mind when developing lesson plans and teaching in the classroom. First, overall, girls have much less experience in the hands-on application of learning principles in lab settings than boys. This could occur in the computer lab, the science lab, or the auto lab – the principle is the same for all of these settings – it requires an overall technology problem-solving schema, accompanied by use and manipulation of tools, and spatial relation skills that very few girls bring with them to the classroom on day one in comparison to boys.

Let’s look at some of the reasons why girls come to the STEM classroom with less of the core skills needed for success in this subject area. Overall, girls and boys play with different kinds of games in early childhood that provide different types of learning experiences. Most girls play games that emphasize relationships (i.e., playing house, playing with dolls) or creativity (i.e., drawing, painting). In contrast, boys play computer and video games or games that emphasize building (i.e., LEGO®), both of which develop problem-solving, spatial-relationship and hands-on skills.

A study of gender differences in spatial relations skills of engineering students in the U.S. and Brazil found that there was a large disparity between the skills of female and male students. These studies attributed female student’s lesser skills set to two statistically significant factors: 1) less experience playing with building toys and 2) having taken less drafting courses prior to the engineering program. Spatial relations skills are critical to engineering. A gender study of computer science majors at Carnegie-Mellon University (one of the preeminent computer science programs in the country) found that, overall, male students come equipped with much better computer skills than female students. This equips male students with a considerable advantage in the classroom and could impact the confidence of female students.

Are these gender differences nature or nurture? There is considerable evidence that they are nurture. Studies show that most leading computer and video games appeal to male interests and have predominantly male characters and themes, thus it is not surprising that girls are much less interested in playing them. A study of computer games by Children Now found that 17% of the games have female characters and of these, 50% are either props, they tend to faint, have high-pitched voices, and are highly sexualized.

There are a number of studies that suggest that when girls and women are provided with the building blocks they need to succeed in STEM they will do as well if not better than their male counterparts. An Introductory Engineering Robotics class found that while males did somewhat better on the pre-test than females, females did as well as the males on the post-test following the class’s completion.

Another critical area of gender difference that teachers of STEM should keep in mind has less to do with actual skills …