Alternative Education – The ADD Child

What educational format is best for the ADD/ADHD child? As a parent, there are many choices, and increasingly popular choices, to public education. While making a decision may seem more difficult in the case of ADD/ADHD, the process is the same for the parent of any child.

A recent article in USA Today reports that home schooling has been on a steady rise for the last five years. There are now 1.5 million children being home schooled, up 74% since 1999. A desire for religious or moral instruction, formerly the number one reason to choose homeschooling, is now the second most popular reason. The first reason is safety and avoidance of peer pressure and exposure to drugs. Third is the dissatisfaction with academic instruction and fourth is interest in nontraditional approaches.

Current statistics indicate that the number of alternative educational/school choices, not including religious based schools or military schools, is somewhere around twelve thousand. That is the largest number of choices ever to exist outside the traditional public school system and the number keeps growing.

Obviously, the selection of public versus private includes many factors, among them the practical aspects of cost, location, transportation and does the alternative represent a basic ideology that the parent feels would be detrimental to the child. What follows is a look at some of the factors in choosing an educational format.

Determining the educational goal, as a parent, is an easy way to eliminate whole groupings of alternative educational choices. However, a parent might be wise to avoid automatically eliminating, for example, religiously based schools because they are simply not of the family’s religion. A school might be quite passive about religious “recruitment” of the child, as are many Catholic private schools, or they may be very active, even aggressive, in the “recruitment” of a child, as are many more fundamentally based religious schools. In one case, a parent chose such a school because of its educational quality but did not fully understand the aggressiveness of the school in converting her child to its belief system. At least not until her child started coming home every day, in tears, begging her mother to convert because she would go to hell if she didn’t. Upon further questioning, it was clear that the school had made the child responsible for the task of converting the mother. The child was nine. The mother moved the child the following week.

Next, we want to look at the child. It is imperative to look at the child from multiple perspectives, not just does he/she have ADD/ADHD. Because ADD plays out differently based on learning style, processing style and communication style, the parent should find the school that either actively teaches in a variety of styles or specializes in the styles that best enable his/her child to learn. The parent should also consider aspects such as the child’s emotional age and if the child has already found his/her passion(s) in life. If the child is brilliant in computer programming and …

Dental Hygienists – Career Overview

Dental Hygienists are licensed professionals who hold their specialization in the field of oral health with a major emphasis laid down on oral hygiene, hence the term 'hygienists'. Dental Hygienists are not exactly dentists, but they do work under them or with them and some of these professionals even hold licenses to administrator local anesthetics.

The procedures that dental hygienists perform majorly include cleaning techniques like prophylaxis, root planting and scaling, dental sealants, administering fluoride and to give instructions regarding dental hygiene and care.

In a nutshell, the process of dental hygiene can be broken down into 5 steps:

Assessing the patient: This is the primary stage of a dental hygienic procedure and majorly involves a case study of the patient's medical history and X-rays. This even includes tests that need to be connected and a periodontal assessment of the mouth. A checklist of the procedures that need to be adopted is prepared in this stage too.

Hygiene Diagnosis: The data that was collected during the assessment is then used to identify the problems, if any, that the patient has. This also helps the doctor to develop a proper treatment plan for the patient.

Planning: This is a stage that pertains to the first and the second stage. A sequential treatment schedule is developed which gives priority to the patient's immediate needs and the areas that require emphasis.

Implementation: The implementation part of the plan is the most important as it involves the implementation of the proposed schedule. Care is taken to keep the treatment timely and effective.

This is the final analysis that is carried out after the treatment procedure. It is vital as it is the key to deducing the facts of how the patient has responded to the therapy. Sometimes, a procedure renders unsatisfactory results and needs to be replaced by a different technique altogether. Evaluation is important in pointing out such scenarios.

Dental hygienists rank among one of the fastest growing occupations. It is estimated that the number of vacancies for these individuals will shoot to 36 percent through 2018, much faster than the average growth rate. As people are becoming more aware about oral hygiene, these hygienists are in high demand through the world, especially in the show industry. There is a scope of a little competition in this field, but it is relatively new so one has bright chances of establishing a flourishing practice. …

Homework Organization For Students (And Their Parents)

I spend a lot of time at my seminars and workshops, on the phone and via email discussing the subject of homework organization. Actually, I spend a lot of time listening to parents complain that their children’s homework disorganization is driving everybody crazy!

Many students have such a hard time getting it together that by the time they finally sit down to do their homework, they are exhausted. No wonder they don’t want to do it! Getting organized will help alleviate exhaustion, bad attitudes, procrastination and rebelliousness.

Homework organization just makes life easier for everyone.

These are the homework organization tips that I use as a student, teacher and parent. Print this list and read it with your children. Then, post it on the fridge and refer to it often so that everybody (parents, kids, babysitters, grandparents) will be on the same organized page.

At School:

  • Write down every, single homework assignment in one place. I strongly recommend using a bound or wire notebook- definitely NOT a loose leaf binder. I don’t care how careful you are, pages will fall out, and then what? You won’t know what to do nor when to do it! A plain notebook is fine, but a datebook or calendar is the best. Some schools even provide these to students. Use it.
  • Write down homework assignments as you get them. This is mostly for older students that change classes and teachers, but it is a good habit for everyone. If the teacher says, “Oh, tonight I want you to read Chapter 4,” write that down in your notebook.
  • Write down every, single due date for a project or paper- even if you have a handout or syllabus. Handouts disappear (I think they hang out with loose socks), but you will still know what to do and when to do it if you have everything written down in your homework notebook.
  • Keep ALL of the day’s homework assignments together in one place. Don’t have a special place or page for math, another for writing, etc. You want to see everything in one spot.
  • Check your homework notebook Three (3) Times A Day: Before you leave school (or each class), double check to make certain that you have everything (books, paper, materials, etc.) that you will need later.

At Home:

  • Before you start doing your homework, look at your notebook and make sure that you are doing the right assignment, the right page, etc.
  • Before you put everything away, take one more quick look. Did you do everything? Good!
  • Make a decision about where you will put your completed homework: into a binder pocket, a special homework folder, etc. You may decide to have a color-coded folder for each class. If you choose to use folders, I strongly recommend using 3-hole punched folders and keeping them together in a 3-ring binder. Whatever you choose, stick to it! Don’t put your homework in your a binder today, a folder tomorrow… And, never, ever fold your homework into a