What to Consider to Find the Right College For You

In trying to decide what type of college will best meet your desires and needs there are many things to consider. Listed below are some of the factors you will need to consider in deciding where you want to go to college.

Type of institution- Private or Public. College or University. Church sponsored.

Colleges can be either public or private. Public colleges are those that are supported by the state in which they are located. Many highly ranked colleges in the United States are state-supported institutions. These colleges can often provide an excellent education at a price for an in-state resident that is much less than comparable private colleges. At the early stages of your investigation, I would encourage you to consider both private and public colleges.

While private colleges frequently cost more than comparable state institutions, they often have the financial means to offer generous need-based or scholarships-based financial aid. This aid can make the cost of a private college the same or less than attending your state college.

Many of the more selective private universities and colleges have a religious affiliation. The extent of spiritual influence varies. But at the beginning of your college search, we strongly encourage you to investigate all private colleges, regardless of religious affiliation.

Academics- What courses and majors are you looking for

The most important reason for going to college is to get an education. The type of academic atmosphere and variety of courses studied is an important factor to be considered when choosing a college. Be careful, however, of choosing a college based solely on it having a particular major or field of study. Research shows that 90% of all college graduates do not major in the field of study they originally had intended. This happens for several reasons.

First, most colleges have majors in subjects you have never before studied such as political science or anthropology. Second, as you gain experience and maturity in college, your interests may change. Take time to explore your options and be realistic about your talents. Be sure to pursue a course of study that is of genuine interest to you, not just one you think might lead to a good career.

If you do have a strong interest in a particular area, such as science, it is important to evaluate a college's facilities and offerings in those areas to make sure they have adequate resources. Remember that many smaller colleges may not offer majors in certain professional fields, such as engineering, business, or physical therapy. If you are certain of a specific field of study, be sure that the colleges and universities you are considering offer that major.

Do not exclude a smaller college, however, simply because you think the resources may beadequate. Remember that all of the resources of a college are available to its undergraduate students whereas at a large university, many of the specialized equipment may be reserved for graduate students only. Some of the largest producers of PhD in this country …

VT Nonprofit Lender Mulls Life After End of Student Loan Program

The Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC) was established in 1965 as a public nonprofit agency designed to oversee the issuing of federal education loans to Vermont students. But with the sweeping reforms to the federal student loan program that were passed in 2009, bundled in with the national health care reform bill, VSAC and agencies like it were stripped of their ability to originate new federal education loans.

As of July 1, 2010, all federal parent and college loans are now provided to borrowers directly by the U.S. Department of Education, and VSAC is now facing a staff reduction of nearly two-thirds as it tries to find ways to survive in the age of the Federal Direct Student Loan Program.

The agency had been a lender in the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), which was discontinued as part of the federal college loan reforms. As part of its lending functions under the FFEL program, VSAC acted as both a lender and servicer of federal college loans.

Under the new world order, with FFELP disbanded, VSAC can still manage (i.e., “service”) all the college loans it had issued in the past, but the agency is no longer able to issue new loans.

Revenues from the repayment of issued loans were used to fund new student loans as well as ongoing financial aid and student loan education programs, so the agency faces a revenue reduction of about 90 percent as its existing loans are repaid.

VSAC still issues a small number of private student loans, non-federal loans funded by VSAC rather than by the Department of Education, but the agency is looking for a new role with the Direct Loan program.

VSAC recently submitted a proposal to the Education Department to service more than the current statutory maximum of 100,000 federal education loans. Under the proposal, the agency is seeking permission to service the student loans of all Vermont students and all non-resident students enrolled at Vermont colleges and universities. Under the new Direct Loan program rules, only four organizations have been authorized so far by the Education Department to service more than the allotted 100,000 federal student loans.

Even if VSAC’s proposal is approved, however, the revenue from servicing the federal direct loans would bring in only a fraction of the revenue the agency once earned as a lender in the FFEL program.

VSAC is also asking the Vermont state legislature to help underwrite its administrative costs by allowing the agency to divert about 7 percent of its $21 million state appropriation from need-based grants and scholarships for students to the agency itself. VSAC is also asking legislators to allow its private student loan borrowers to deduct up to $500 of the interest on its private student loans from their state taxes.

The agency’s future role is unclear and is likely to remain that way until at least April, while it waits for a determination on the expanded servicing of federal college loans made through the Direct Loan program. The …

Cake Shop – Your Tasty Managing Career

EleFun Games offer you a new time-management game that stands in line with the recent tenders in the casual game industry. You are the manager of a confectionery where you serve multi-layered cakes and beverages to demanding customers. The game play largely resembles Burger Shop, but it has some features distinguishing it from others.

A career as a cafe manager? That's a piece of cake!

That's how Emily, a young college graduate, thought when she received a call from Gail Davis, the owner of a newly opened confectionery. She did not hesitate a bit before accepting the offer – and here is the first day of work!

As you already understood, nothing new for the story here. The game play is basically typical for all time-management games, though it has some new twists. At first you have just a show-case with three types of loafs and three types of jam for your cakes and a trash bin. Watch carefully for your customers' orders and work fast, creating three-layer cakes for them – and soon you'll be able to acquire some new fittings for your cafe.

Here we come to the main attractions of the game, including the addictive game play (and it is addictive, believe me). After each level you can see how a number of your game parameters have changed. First, it is the level of your Cafe – measured in stars and determining the efficiency of your work. It depends on the fittings you have purchased, and, actually, on the diversity of your menu. And you can buy upgrades based on two other parameters – your Cash and Mastery. With cash everything is simple – it's just the money you have earned during the time-management levels. Mastery is something you can raise by elearning tips. The amount of your tips depends on your level of service, that is on how long you make your customers wait. The more tips – the higher your Mastery is. And if you comply with the minimum Cash and Mastery requirements – you are welcome to purchase new fittings for your Cafe, like coffee machine, ice-cream, drinks, additional tables etc. All of those raise the rating of your enterprise and attract more customers.

Tip: prepare fresh portions of drinks, cotton candy etc. immediately after serving the previous ones, replacing them in the machines. This significantly saves your time.

But these are not the only things to spend your money on. While Emily adores her new job, she starts missing her home very soon, and Gail suggests that she builds a home for herself there. The construction raises Emily's mood, and while she is smiling your customers become more patient. But in order to proceed with it you will also need money – and sometimes it is even more important than the upgrades.

But enough words. It's time to play and have fun with your Cake Shop! …

How to Make a Career – Life Change

Have you've felt like your job does not match your talents, skills and attributes with who you are and what you're doing? Have you wanted to make a career / life transition, and do not know where to start? Let's take a look at the topics to consider making a life / career change. Making a career / life change is a process. It is not something you can think about for a few hours that will result in your "dream job". Sometimes we want the life / career change to be fulfilled quickly, and with little inner soul-searching. However, it does not work that way. It took you many years to get where you are today. To make a career / life change takes time as well.

It is a process that takes personal reflection time, some serious research, assessment of your skills, values ​​and attitudes, time spent in identification of an area of ​​your life that you are passionate about to help you identify your gift, listening to your true desires , then writing your goals, and creating a plan. Lastly, it is working your plan!

Before you make a decision to change your career / life, you need to clarify who you are and what are your natural gifts. This is the time to find a quiet place where you will not be interrupted or disturbed. This is a time to look inside and identify what you do best, and why you feel you do it well. Ask yourself, what distinguishes me from others who do the same thing I perform? This step is often omitted. Individuals tend to think they only need to summarize the typical work experiences from jobs, the education and the achievements realized from holding different positions. Look at your career as a composition or a piece of art that has many facets that shine and reflect who you are. You're not just a series of employment dates and companies. You are committed to many inward and outward experiences, events and accomplishments. You are more than the work experiences you've had.

Career / life transition combines your core competencies, personal values, life style and belief systems you learned as you matured. Once you've made the decision to move forward and make a change in your career or life, the next step is to assess and identify your values, skills, the roles you've performed from childhood to adult, identify the major life-changing experiences that have affected your life, or have produced great life lessons, assess your education, evaluate your past and current work experiences, identify areas of expertise, your work environment, interests, hobbies, work preferences, what you like and do not like about a job or career, and where you want to work – both geographically as well as indoors or outside. Summarizing all the components of who you are, and what's important to you, as well as your work and life experiences provides a composite picture of you, that will help you select …

Teen Parenting – Career Planning for Your Children

"How should I get established in my career?"

"What should I do?"

You can help your teen find answers to above important career questions. How? Help your teen son or daughter in following the 3 simple Career Planning steps given below. These steps are based on more advanced career planning techniques which we teach in Success Mindware: Total Self-Development Program for Children.

Career Planning Step 1. What I want to do?

In this step, ask your teens to think and write down what job or business they would like to do. This is the most important step!

Career Planning Step 2: How am I going to get that?

Once your children decide what job they want to do, then next step is to find out how to get it.

In this step, you and your children have to find answers to these 3 basic career related questions:

"What courses or training do they have to do in order to get the job they want?

"What working style or skills do they have to learn?

"What kind of part-time job or internship do they have to do?

Once your teens find out answers to above questions, they will have a powerful career plan sitting right in front of their eyes. You can easily help your teen son or daughter find answers to such questions by searching on internet or library.

Career Planning Step 3: Who can help me in what I want to do?

This step is all about forming important "connections."

Ask your teens to write names of people who can give more detailed information about their career, who can tell them which college or course is good, or whom they should contact to get a job!

Once your children get such information, they will be able to work on their career goal very easily.

Now here's a smart tip: the best person who can help your children in this task is a person who is already working in that career. For example, if your teenage daughter wanted to become Interior Designer then she should meet and ask for guidance from a person who is already working as an interior designer.

If you or your children do not know about any such person, then you can easily find it out by asking:

"Your children's teachers

"Friends

"Neighbors

"Relatives

Or just talk with some Career counselor.

In this way, using the above 3 simple steps, you can help your teens to plan for their career easily. For more help in your teen's education and career, check out this popular program called Success Mindware: Total Self-Development Program For Children available at http://mindpowerguide.biz …

Immortalizing Values Through Education for Sustainable Development

Education is the primary agent of transformation towards sustainable development, increasing people’s capacities to transform their visions for society into reality. Education not only provides scientific and technical skills, it also provides the motivation, and social support for pursuing and applying them. For this reason, society must be deeply concerned that much of current education falls far short of what is required. When we say this, it reflects the very necessities across the cultures that allow everyone become responsible towards quality enhancement.

Improving the quality and revelation of education and reorienting its goals to recognize the importance of sustainable development must be among society’s highest priorities. It is not that we talk only about environment but also about every component of life.

We therefore need to clarify the concept of education for sustainable development. It was a major challenge for educators during the last decade. The meanings of sustainable development in educational set ups, the appropriate balance of peace, human rights, citizenship, social equity, ecological and development themes in already overloaded curricula, and ways of integrating the humanities, the social sciences and the arts into what had up-to-now been seen and practiced as a branch of science education.

Some argued that educating for sustainable development ran the risk of programming while others wondered whether asking schools to take a lead in the transition to sustainable development was asking too much of teachers.

These debates were compounded by the desire of many, predominantly environmental, NGOs to contribute to educational planning without the requisite understanding of how education systems work, how educational change and innovation takes place, and of relevant curriculum development, professional development and instructive values. Not realizing that effective educational change takes time, others were critical of governments for not acting more quickly.

Consequently, many international, regional and national initiatives have contributed to an expanded and refined understanding of the meaning of education for sustainable development. For example, Education International, the major umbrella group of teachers’ unions and associations in the world, has issued a declaration and action plan to promote sustainable development through education.

A common agenda in all of these is the need for an integrated approach through which all communities, government entities, collaborate in developing a shared understanding of and commitment to policies, strategies and programs of education for sustainable development.

Actively promoting the integration of education into sustainable development at local community

In addition, many individual governments have established committees, panels, advisory councils and curriculum development projects to discuss education for sustainable development, develop policy and appropriate support structures, programs and resources, and fund local initiatives.

Indeed, the roots of education for sustainable development are firmly planted in the environmental education efforts of such groups. Along with global education, development education, peace education, citizenship education, human rights education, and multicultural and anti-racist education that have all been significant, environmental education has been particularly significant. In its brief thirty-year history, contemporary environmental education has steadily striven towards goals and outcomes similar and comparable to those inherent in …