The True Value of Twelve Years of Free Public Education: A Fortune Geatly Devalued

As it currently stands in the second decade of the 21st Century, most of the adolescent and preadolescent boys and girls attending public schools in the United States sadly don’t grasp the meaningful value of the 12 years of free education offered to them. The most comfortable and technically modern classrooms and laboratories are, in most cases, provided by approximately 99,000 public schools in approximately 16,000 school districts across the country for the physical bodies of these, approximately, 50 million elementary, middle, and high school students. The reason I’ve said bodies, and not minds, is that around 70 percent of those millions of students don’t particularly find going to school, free of charge, mentally stimulating and educationally rewarding. These physically healthy school-age children attend school primarily because it is required by law, and when they do come to school, they park their bodies in the comfortable classroom desks, leaving their minds somewhere else, but not at school.

It’s quite thought-provoking to realize that the greater percentage of all the 18 year-old adolescents in the USA, who graduated from American high schools in 2012, actually graduated on a cumulative 10th grade-level. That’s right. From the first-grade to the twelfth-grade, American students are given the freedom to learn as much, or as little, as they have the desire to do; but as the old expression goes, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.” For the last 40 years most high school seniors in the U.S. have been graduating on a 10th grade-level, some on a 9th grade-level. Strangely though, from 1920 until around 1969, the exact opposite occurred. For those students who attended public schools during those years, 80 percent of all elementary, junior high, and high school students did well academically, and most of them finished 12 years of education and graduated on a 12th grade-level. The dismal decline in learning that started around 1970 was evidenced by the fact that most high school graduates began needing remediation in the basic learning skills (reading, writing, and mathematics). This disturbing trend has rampantly continued to the present day, as approximately 68 percent of the total number of American high school graduates, in 2012, had to remediate the basic academic skills (reading, writing, and basic finite math), which they should have learned during the elementary and middle school years, if they wanted to qualify academically for admission at a major university. Sadly, only a staggering 32 percent of all graduating high school seniors, in 2012, qualified, at the time of graduation, to attend four-year universities.

These dismal figures are understandable only when they are viewed objectively in relationship with the concomitant variables of public education, which I have discussed in great detail in previous essays. These dependent variables are those directly, and primarily, associated with the types of parenting received by the millions of school-age children from their mothers, fathers, and alternate care-givers while at home during the years prior to 1970. In a nutshell, there has …

Tulane University History

The history of Tulane University is a particularly unique one when compared to the stories of universities of a similar age.

The private college located in New Orleans, Louisiana is known today as Tulane began with meager beginnings as the Medical College of Louisiana in 1834. Interestingly, modern day Tulane University owes its existence to a fear of yellow fever and smallpox – two diseases largely considered to be eradicated in the modern Western World. It was fear of outbreaks, particularly of the diseases just mentioned, that inspired New Orleans residents to open what was at the time only the second medical school located in the South.

In 1847 the school expanded its curriculum and officially became The University of Louisiana with a law school being added four years later. While some devote Tulane fans and alumni know that the school was established in 1834 fewer realize that the school has not run continuously since that time. The then titled University of Louisiana closed its doors during the civil war from April 1861 through April 1865, as did numerous schools during the time. Following the civil war the school faced a smorgasbord of financial issues that culminated with an agricultural crisis that was due in no small part to inclement weather. At the time of the school's most dire financial hardship Paul Tulane was a man that successfully owned both a clothing and dry goods business. Mr. Tulane's successful business endeavors equaled him the ability to donate sizable amounts of real estate to the ailing university.

It would not be until half a century after the school was established that in 1884 pledges from Paul Tulane would allow the university to become privatized. It was at the time of the privatization that the name was basically changed from The University of Louisiana to Tulane University. To this day Tulane remains as the only instance in American history of a university shifting from a state sponsored public institution to a private college.

While numerous milestones were reached during the twentieth century none compared to the devastating effects that Hurricane Katrina had on the community in the early part of the twenty first century. In August, 2005 Hurricane Katrina forever imputed the New Orleans landscape and Tulane University was no exception. In trying times character is revealed and one notable positive effect of the catastrophe is that Tulane became the first high research institution to mandate that a public service fulfillment would be a prerequisite to completing an undergraduate degree.

While no one can predict the future with absolute certy it seems safe to say that considering Tulane University's history of overcoming adversity, future prosperity is all but a sure thing. …

Suggested Careers For Myers Briggs Test Personality Types

During times of a major economic downturn many people decide to change their career. Usually a major career change will require that you go back to school. Going back to school can be a tough decision especially if you have already started your career. To help decide which career type you should follow we have created a list of careers that are best suited for each of the 16 Myers Briggs personality types.

ESTJ

Military, business administrators, managers, police/detective work, judges, financial officers, teachers, sales representatives, government workers, insurance agents, underwriters, nursing administrators, trade and technical teachers, mafia dons. Natural leaders, they work best when they are in charge and enforcing the rules.

ISTJ

Business executives, administrators and managers, accountants, police, detectives, judges, lawyers, medical doctors, dentists, computer programmers, systems analysts, computer specialists, auditors, electricians, math teachers, mechanical engineers, steelworkers, technicians, militia members. Similar to the ESTJ, they have a knack for detail and memorization, but work more behind the scenes instead of up front as a leader.

ESFJ

Home economics, nursing, teaching, administrators, child care, family practice physician, clergy, office managers, counselers, social workers, bookkeeping, accounting, secretaries, organization

leaders, dental assistants, homemakers, radiological technologists, receptionists, religious educators, speech pathologists.. They do best in jobs where they can apply their natural warmth at building relationships with other people.

ISFJ

Interior decorators, designers, nurses, administrators, managers, secretaries, child care/early childhood development, social work, counselors, paralegals, clergy, office managers, shopkeepers,

bookkeepers, homemakers, gardeners, clerical supervisors, curators, family practice physicians, health service workers, librarians, medical technologists, typists. Tradition-oriented and down-to-earth, they do best in jobs where they can help people achieve their goals, or where structure is needed.

ESTP

Sales representatives, marketers, police, detectives, paramedics, medical technicians, computer technicians, computer technical support, entrepreneurs, comedians, agents, race car drivers,

firefighters, military, loan sharks, con men, auditors, carpenters, craft workers, farmers, laborers, service workers, transportation operatives. They have a gift for reacting to and solving immediate problems, and persuading other people.

ISTP

Police, detectives, forensic pathologists, computer programmers, system analysts, computer specialists, engineers, carpenters, mechanics, pilots, drivers, athletes, entrepreneurs, firefighters,

paramedics, construction workers, dental hygienists, electrical engineers, farmers, military, probation officers, steelworkers, transportation operatives, hit men. With the ability to stay calm

under pressure, they excel in any job which requires immediate action.

ESFP

Actors, painters, comedians, adult entertainers, sales representatives, teachers, counselors, social workers, child care, fashion designers, interior decorators, consultants, photographers,

musicians, human resources managers, clerical supervisors, coaches, factory supervisors, food service workers, receptionists, recreation workers, religious educators, respiratory therapists.. Optimistic and fun-loving, their enthusiasm is great for motivating others.

ISFP

Artists, musicians, composers, designers, child care workers, social workers, counselers, teachers, veterinarians, forest rangers, naturalists, bookkeepers, carpenters, personal service workers,

clerical supervisors, secretaries, dental and medical staffers, waiters and waitresses, chefs, nurses, mechanics, physical therapists, x-ray technicians. They tend to do well in the arts, as well as helping others and working with people.

ENFJ

Teachers, consultants, psychiatrists, social workers, counselers, clergy, sales representative, human resources, managers, events coordinators, politicians, diplomats, writers, …

The Art and Science of Book Promotion – To Delegate or Not to Delegate

Backward glance

I introduced to you the concept of handling your book promotion project like a small business in its start-up stage. We also got down to the basics of one of the important tools in the small business start-up process-capitalization. In this article, we will delve into the second tool-delegation-through which you will learn wherever, what, why, and how to delegate particular tasks in book promotion.

To Delegate or Not to Delegate

In an article from entrepreneur.com, "delegation" is described as something that is easy to talk about but difficult to do:

"… it's a critical decision, mainly because some tasks should be handled only by you but others, which take up your valuable time, can easily be handled by someone else."

Organization psychologist and entrepreneur, Dr. David G. Javitch, states that one of the common reasons why entrepreneurs refuse to delegate tasks is the fear of losing control over the project. Although it is a common mentality among starting businessmen to think that they are "the 'best' or 'only' person who can do the job right," the excuse is not sound, logical, or practical when huge chunks of time, effort, and money go to waste because the boss does not want to involve or trust other people. Delegation of tasks, however, plays a significant role in business operations and must there before be learned.

To instill the idea of ​​task delegation in your book promotion business, let's start with a number of things that have to be done in order to get the delegation system running like a well-oiled machine. There are three categories that need to be considered: things you are already good at; things you have no idea and never will have an idea of ​​how to do on your own; and the unknown in between the two, or what we'll call the "I dunno" category. Unfortunately, that third category takes up the largest portion of the picture.

You do not need to be a book promotion expert to gather a list of the most common 15 or 20 book promotion activities or services; the aforementioned Taleist survey is a good start. You can go to the websites of a number of firms that offer promotional services to authors. It would also be smart if you look for firms that work for traditional publishers in the area of ​​promotion and publicity, as they are relatively competent, but unfortunately very expensive. You may find them out of reach, but the goal here is for you to do your own "guerrilla" research. There are also promotional services by freelancers who can help you build your list, although the vast majority are so too expensive, and as you hire freelancers you start to have to do much more research to vet them. The point is for you to try to learn about every promotional effort on your list, no matter how silly it sounds, so that you are not a 'mark' for unscrupulous providers.

Once you have your list, …