Necessity of Online Education for Older Women

The system of linking students, teachers and learning resources when they are not in the same location is called "distance learning". Earlier, distance learning made effective use of communication technologies like the postal service, and then television programs. However, a huge shift occurred after the advent of the Internet and "online education" was born. This transformed not only the methods of education but also the development and propagation of knowledge and communications between students and teachers. But how did all this effect older women? Technology gifted new opportunities for many older women to achieve educational goals and they successfully managed to balance home and education.

Universities now form partnerships with businesses and even each other to compete better, in a greatly expanded worldwide market for students. The growth of online education can be attributed primarily to these reasons –

• You get to choose the class hours according to your discretion.

• Instead of a typical classroom environment, you get to learn in the comfort of your home.

• Since the actual sessions are never crowded, more attention is focused on you.

• Zero delivery cost. Also you get to choose a class which fits your personal style and budget.

• Since there is to-and-fro involved, you save a lot of time.

According to a survey, more than 2 million students enrolled in online education courses in 2002 alone. If a recent US government document is to be believed, the average age of online students is 34 years old and they are mostly female.

So why do older women pursue continuing education? According to a survey, the main imputuses of women for returning to education are –

• Expansion of their current career

• Enhancement of current salary

• Changing or beginning careers

• Returning to staff position

• Pursuing personal advantages

Among the women surveyed, 20% belonged to the age group of 41 – 50.

The top online colleges offering scholarships in America are –

(i) Liberty University

(ii) Post University

(iii) Kaplan University

(iv) DeVry University

(v) American Inter Continental University

(vi) Grand Canyon University.

The number of older women currently working to complete courses and degrees online represents a social wonder. Awareness of women's problems and measures to help overcome the tribulations are required to raise the success of both older women and online programs.

Although women are the main users, they are grossly underrepresented in high-tech sectors and among university administrators who are currently influential to online learning. Many adult women returning to college classes have to tackle significant hurdles not usually experienced by men. Many women balance career, community and household tasks against their curricular work. They often have serious economic liabilities too. Customarily, they have grappled with these difficulties while while facing inflexible class schedules and educational policies, incompetent childcare, lack of appropriate lodging, and lack of dependable transport. Online education seeks to solve all this and more. …

A Career Tip for Students – Have a Back-Up Plan

How many people do you know from college who ended up employed in careers absolutely unrelated to their degrees? I know a few … actually, quite a few. Indeed, I would venture to say that a sizeable majority of college grads are now doing exactly what they did not set out to do. Out of survival necessity, or because a new dose of reality changed their interests or plans, they failed to something that simply did not figure into their original thinking. Dave has a BA in anthropology from the University of Washington, but, six years of stock clerk jobs later, along with some significant re-schooling, we see him working as a software engineer with Lockheed Martin. Janet has a BS in art history, but marriage, children, the cost of living, and the job market have directed her to re-train as a medical assistant. She is now working at a major hospital. These are both fictional characters and events, but they are based on an army of real cases.

So, if you are a student early in your college career and you are still thinking about choosing a major, or if you are a high school graduate looking forward, here is a piece of advice – do not choose a major. Choose TWO majors. Particularly if your major major (which you are passionately attached to) is not something "hot", as the job market goes, you may want to explore a second major that piques your interest but at the same time will afford you practical work opportunities as soon as possible after you graduate. In other words – HAVE A BACK-UP PLAN. This may mean taking a few extra courses. This may mean re-orienting your thinking a little about your future and your dreams. Here is a good first step in that direction: Check out the Occupational Outlook Handbook online by going to bls.gov/oco.

This is an excellent and comprehensive source of information about a variety of occupations. It is produced and updated by the US Department of Labor and it is entirely online – no need to purchase or order anything or complete an online registration form. For hundreds of occupations, this Handbook will tell you about training and education required, salaries, what the workers do on the job, the working conditions, information about the job market for each state, and, possibly most relevant to our topic – expected job prospects and job search tips. After you have done a little homework with this and any other sources you can get your hands on, then look at the school programs and requirements related to your choice (or short-list of choices, as the case may be).

Always remember that, no matter what your career passion is at the moment, it is a good thing to diversify. Go for two or more skill / education sets, rather than one. You may be glad you did … and you may have a little more control over your future as a result, instead …

Ready, Set, Career!

Long gone are the days when 'career' counseling was only meant for students at college or university level, in an increasingly competitive world it is important and integral for a student's success later in life that they start planning for their career well in advance. For students in their early teens the most crucial deciding factor that outlines the path for a career later in life comes from the selection of subjects chosen usually in 8th or 9th grade. Therefore, a "Subject Combination" is not a new concept.

In most schools, students get to choose from 3 basic subject combinations, Pre-Medical, Pre-Engineering and Commerce. The names speak for themselves in this scenario, if you aspire to become a Doctor then definitely "Pre-Medical" is for you, and If you see yourself as an Engineer or an Accountant then Pre-Engineering and Commerce respectively, are the way to go, however, this is a very simplistic assumption and there is more to it which should be discussed.

As an early teen you may not be the pilot of your own life and your parents, teachers and inspirations may guide you towards a path. When you reach a point in your school life when you're finally ready to go to college / university, you'll realize that a wide range of specializations and careers await you and by the time you would be mature enough to take your own decisions . Getting the first step right is necessary. Suggesting from experience, for many students who are not yet sure what they would want to pursue in the future, Mathematics or Additional Mathematics as a part of your subject combination is highly recommended. It would help you get into various Engineering and Business fields and may even help you if you wish to go for a Social Science major, such as Economics.

You might also want to play to your strengths; this approach works best when you know what your forte is, if you're good at languages ​​how about studying Literature? Believe me, it will definitely help broaden your horizons and a good grade would make a good impression on your college application.

Years spent in high school, are a fun, thrilling and memorable experience. Taking the right decisions and focusing on your grades and extra-curricular activities ensure that you have a solid foundation when applying to universities and colleges. There are thousands of candidates applying in universities at the same time and it's what sets you apart from them that would get you a place in your desired academic institution, once you're in high school it's never too early to start planning for your career.

Best of luck! …

Why You Should Pursue a Career in Commercial Truck Driving

Why should you pursue a career in commercial truck driving? That is a very good question. Hopefully, by the end of this article, you will have sufficient valuable information to answer it yourself. So, why should anyone pursue a career in commercial truck driving? Let me start by giving you some fascinating statistics about the trucking industry.

Did you know that of all the modes of shipment in the commercial transportation industry, the trucking sector dominates the field with 83.7% of the revenue? The rail industry comes in at a distant second with only 5.6% of the total revenue. The air sector is third with 3.2%, and the oceanic freight sector is strictly in the running with only 1.4% of all revenue being transported by ships. As you can see, the trucking industry is not going away anytime soon. In fact, the trucking industry alone collections 650 billion dollars in annual revenue each year. That's 5% of the nation's GDP! The trucking industry also pays out 35 billion dollars in federal, state, and highway use taxes per year and will grow by 21% over the next ten years. Not many skilled fields can promise you such great job security without a four year college degree like the trucking industry can.

Speaking of job security, in May of 2013 there was an estimated 1.5 million heavy truck and tractor trailer drivers arriving an average median salary of $ 38,700 a year, which calculates to roughly $ 18.61 an hour. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that truck drivers who were at the lower end of the pay scale still made $ 25,330 a year and truck drivers who were at the high end of the pay scale made $ 59,620 per year. How many other jobs can boast such a wide range of salaries without a four-year or two-year college degree? Not many. So, where are more truck drivers employed than anywhere else? Texas, California, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Illinois. The state of Texas rented 157, 260 truckers in 2013 while Illinois employed an estimated 66,050 truck drivers. But, do not think you will have to relocate to one of these five states in order to find a decent truck driving job. The entire east coast is full of states that have an average 40,210 to 157,260 working truck drivers. If you're looking for the states with the highest concentration of truck driving jobs in the US look no further. North Dakota boasts 15,310 trucking jobs with an average median salary of $ 47,580 while Arkansas, Nebraska, Iowa, and Wyoming follow closely. Truck drivers in Alaska have the highest median salary at $ 53,440, while trucks in North Dakota, Massachusetts, District of Columbia, and Wyoming make an average $ 47,000 a year. If you were to look at a map of the United States showing the areas where the most truck drivers are employed, you would see that truck drivers are heavily employed from Texas all the way over to …

Are You Relevant? Retooling Your Career For the Future

How marketable are you right now? What will you need to do to make sure you're still relevant five years from now?

When the economy is in recession, workers focus on their marketability. They're either trying to hang on to their jobs or trying to land new ones. Nobody wants to be deemed redundant, or expendable, or a weak candidate. Those are labels no one can afford to be tagged with. People spend time thinking about how they can shore up weaknesses and increase perceived value.

Unfortunately, though, when the job market finally rights itself, a lot of those same people will just as suddenly put thoughts about how to stay relevant on the back burner. And that will be a mistake.

Even when the economy begins expanding again, we're still going to be looking at a dynamic job market. Remember back just a few short years ago when the market was red hot? People were still facing layoffs. Companies were still merging – or outsourcing – or streamlining operations – resulting in head count reductions. Of course jobs were not being lost at the pace they are now, but the point is … you're better make sure you're marketable.

If you do not keep up with the pace of change, you will always be vulnerable.

Your skill set needs to be broad and relevant. You need to be sure you're making a meaningful contribution to the organization. You need to identify future trends early and understand what you need to do to adapt and thrive.

This will require initiative on your part. Nobody's going to do this for you; it's your responsibility to make sure you're as marketable as possible. …