Firearm Education in Schools

Gun safety is an assortment of guidelines and recommendations that can be applied when possessing, storing, or handling firearms. The purpose of gun safety is to eradicate or diminish the risks of unintentional death, harm or damage triggered by improper possession, storage, or treatment of firearms. Gun education for children should start at home, but not all parents are equally knowledgeable about gun safety rules and regulations. All children K-12 should have an equal chance to learn about gun safety and the laws incorporated with firearms; therefore optional firearm education and training courses should be offered by schools.

Firearm education and training courses should be an optional course offered in the same manner that sexual education courses are made accessible by schools. Gun education and training courses for students should be available for every student, but be discretionary to only the students who have written parental consent. These courses should also be designed around different age groups, offering different course material that is suitable for the mentality and maturity of the children. The courses should be broken into three different levels, kindergarten through fourth grade, fifth through eighth grade, and ninth through twelve grade.

The first stage of gun education in schools will be designated for children ranging from kindergarten to fourth grade. These programs will not be designed to instill whether guns are good or bad, they will be intended to promote the protection and safety of children. There will be no firearms used in the program, and the lessons will not condone promoting firearm ownership or use. It will also get students to release guns and take action in the same manner that they would have any other harmful American household item like chemicals, electrical shock, and medicines. This program should be perceived as an avoidance type of program helping to prevent the intentional carrying and use of guns. The main message children should learn is if they see a gun, stop, do not touch, leave the area and tell an adult.

The second stage of gun education in schools will be designated for children ranging from fifth to eighth grade. These programs will integrate the educational history of firearms along with hands on training. Students will learn about the evolution of small arms and the unbiased impacts that they have had on history. They will also be informed of the second amendment and their constitutional right to keep and bear arms. For the first time students will be introduced with hands on training using non-functional replica guns that will help students understand the proper handling and care of a gun. These hands on courses will be entwined with a hunter's safety course, which is more than your average firearm safety course. Instruction will include ethics and responsibility, wildlife identification, conservation and wildlife management, survival and first aid, special hunting and tree stand safety. This will allow students under the age of 16 to legally hunt with an adult, and help them to become more comfortable with the …

Career in the Textile Industry: An Overview

With the growth in the textile industry over the years, new avenues have opened up for people looking forward to pursue a career in this sector. The sector offers a broad range of career options including fashion designing, textile engineering, fabric development management, press operating, knitting and many more. Climbing up the ladder, a professional in this field can earn up to several lakh of rupees. Given below are a few career options which exist in this field.

Fashion Designing

As Indian fashion is gaining popularity worldwide, the demand for fashion designers has gone up by leaps and bounds. Fashion designing is one of the most glamorous, lucrative, and appealing careers in this sector. A fashion designer has to be creative and must have good communication skills to understand the requirement of the client. He / She has to know what others are creating to stay ahead in the competition. Institutions like NIFT and NIFD impart quality education in fashion designing and churn out thousands of students each year.

The duties of a fashion designer include regular meetings with executives to review design ideas, selecting the right fabric for the design, supervising the stitch work and holding trials with in-house models. A fashion designer has to select and prepare the right models for showcasing their designs. Sabyasachi Mukherjee, Rohit Bal, Manish Malhotra, Ritu Beri and Wendell Rodricks are some of the prominent fashion designers of India.

Textile Engineer

A textile engineer has to design and control all aspects of yarn, fiber and textile process. In textile engineering, one learns about the various principles of scientific and engineering methodologies which are then implemented for producing textile fabrics. Textile engineers not only develop new methods of production, but also work on improving the current textile fibers. Students willing to pursue a career in textile engineering must have science in 10 + 2 with Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics as their core subjects. Textile engineers are employed by both private and government organizations.

Fabric Development Manager

A fabric development manager is responsible for research, development and application of fabrics chosen by designers. Apart from this, a fabric development manager also has to look for mill development partners and sign agreements with them. He / She also needs to create awareness regarding the design and fabric created by competitors. A fabric development manager must have knowledge on mills and vendor agreements along with understanding about knitting and weaving. The person should possess immunity project management skills.

Frame Spinner

A frame spinner is one who operates the machine which spins the fibers into yarns. A frame spinner may operate one machine or several machines simultaneously. He has to twist ends of the yarn, clean the machine and also repair breaks in the routes of the fiber.

Screen Printer & Merchandiser

A screen printer is in charge of printing images on finished products using machines. A merchandiser chooses and purchases cloth for their retail employers to sell in respective stores. …

Take Charge of Your Career – How to Build Your Career Management Muscle

Are you concerned about your career progress – or lack thereof? Are you waiting for your boss, Human Resources or a career coach to tell you what to do? Are you confused as to whether or not to go back to school? Are you worried that you are not building enough long-term wealth? Are you searching for career options? Has the career you chosen during college turned out to be not as much fun as you anticipated? Are your talents and competencies underutilized in your current position? Are you worried that if you leave your current employer you might be an easy layoff target in the eyes of a new employer?

These issues and more face today's professional or executive. Unfortunately, we are not taught in high school, college or even on the job – how to grow our own careers. So we spend years listening to others, reading an article or two and then doing nothing but complaining to friends and family.

We all fail to take positive action or make mistakes in managing our practitioners. I have also made a few career mistakes. Some of the more common care management mistakes people make include:

1. Thinking that someone else (your boss, HR or a friend) is going to manage your career progress.

2. Waiting for the right opportunity to find you.

3. Going back to school without developing a 5 Year Career Management Plan.

4. Assuming that if you start networking, you will be perceived as being a "phony" or will be viewed as "begging" for a job.

5. Feeling and behaving like a failure after a job loss.

Making forward progress in your career – fortunately, or unfortunately – means you have to consider yourself to be in training much like a professional or an Olympic-bound athlete. You will need to invest "training" and "practice" time and effort into developing your career management muscle.

The best approach to developing this muscle is to first decide on your short- and long-term career goals. What do you want to do next, in 18 months and in five years? Write it down and make a commitment to achieve your goals.

Next, consider yourself as a product. What are the features and benefits of your product? Why would a new employer hire you? What features do you need to upgrade or improve?

Then develop an action plan that identifies the steps you need to take in order to reach your goals. This is the time to be creative, ask others for their suggestions.

You are the only person that has a vested interest in your career satisfaction and you are the only person who can decide on and undertake a new growth-producing, wealth building, career development path! …

A College’s Bait & Switch

Your child was accepted to a college which offered a financial aid package. And chances are good that the last paragraph of the award notice stated that the offer was good for all 4 years if a certain minimum GPA is maintained.

So far, so good. Everyone is clear on what is expected.

CAUTION: Some colleges do NOT write in this last paragraph for a reason: money. Their money. Money they don’t want to give away next year.

If your student’s award letter has no mention of maintaining a minimum GPA all four years of college, call the college and ask for the Director of Financial Aid. Ask if the award amount you received is guaranteed all 4 years. If the answer is “Yes,” but you don’t see it in the letter, it’s possible that it’s stated in the school’s financial aid policy statement. “Possible” means you’d better find out soon.

If you have access to the college’s policy statement on financial aid, but you see no mention of a guarantee for all 4 years based on a minimum GPA, ask for an email confirmation of the director’s “Yes” to be sent as soon as you conclude the conversation. If you don’t receive the confirmation within 5 days, call back the same person and discretely and gently ask for the email confirmation again. The email acts as a legal document in case you need it later.

I bet you see where this is going. Protect yourself against the possibility that the school is pulling a fast one. Most colleges don’t use this tactic, but if you don’t notice it, what will be your explanation to your child next year if there’s not enough financial aid coming from the school in the second year? What will be your recourse if the school says that they have a policy of not guaranteeing a similar aid package based on a minimum GPA, and that it isn’t their fault if you didn’t notice?

The devil is in the details.…