Post 9/11 GI Bill Changes – Military Students Can Attend Online Universities

Millions of military veterans have used the GI Bill throughout the decades in order to obtain an education and better their future. The GI Bill has seen numerous revisions and updates throughout the years. Let’s take a look at the changes in the latest post 9/11 GI Bill.

One of the biggest changes is that veterans have more options available. Now they can choose from apprentice programs, vocational schools, technical institutions and even online colleges with distance learning programs. This new change is expected to help veterans deal with unemployment. Experts predict that approximately thirteen thousand veterans would be able to secure employment within a year thanks to vocational training. These vocational programs are suitable for veterans who want to secure employment as soon as possible and who aren’t looking for a job that requires a four year degree.

These new changes will allow veterans to obtain very specific training which should help them to obtain jobs. The government is broadening the options for schooling with the intention of reducing unemployment for veterans; women in particular. Statistics provided by the U.S Department of Labor show that 16.6 of female veterans are currently unemployed. In order to combat the problem of unemployment, the current administration has introduced Obama’s American Job Act which provides a tax credit for any company who hires an unemployed veteran.

Changes have also been made in regards to “break pay”. This means that students will not receive benefits between enrollments. Students benefiting from the Montgomery GI Bill have the ability to switch over to the Post 9/11 GI Bill.

Housing stipends used to be only available to students attending traditional 4-year universities and colleges. However, now students enrolled in an online education program will also be able to qualify for benefits. This new stipulation will go into effect as of October of 2011. The Post 9/11 GI Bill allows for a stipend of one thousand dollars per year towards school books. Changes have also been made to cap out tuition for those attending a private university at $17,500. As a result, some students who are currently enrolled at a private university may have to pay some of their own way or obtain student loans.

The GI Bill was signed into law in 1944 in order to assist World War II veterans with university and vocational training. It also helped to provide veterans with access to various loan programs. One of the most significant part of the program was the home loan program which enabled a large number of Americans to purchase a home for the first time.…

The Difference Between a Job and a Career

It is estimated that the average worker will have 14 jobs in his or her working life. It is no longer a bad thing to change jobs. But that does not mean you should wander aimlessly from company to company. If you know the difference between a job and career and think long-term, you will prosper wherever you go.

A job is:

  • A regular activity performed in exchange for payment
  • A position in which one is currently employed.

A career is:

  • A chosen pursuit; a profession or occupation.
  • The general course or progress of one's working life or one's professional achievements over time

Bottom line: your job is what you are doing today. Your career is what you've done over the past years and what you plan to do in the future. So when you think "career" , you have to think long-term. And when you think long-term, you begin to realize the following:

  • Everything you do counts
  • Everything you do needs to have a good reason behind it
  • You have to make good decisions
  • Always think "What's my next step?"
  • What you do today determines your tomorrow
  • Mistakes can potentially haunt you for a long time

You should pay serious attention to this "career" thing. Your job feeds you and your family today. Your career will feed you and your family tomorrow and beyond. …